Theses

  • 15089
  • 0
  • "Hey Faggot" Understanding that the Current Homeless System Planning Policy, and Land Use Planning Tools is not Designed to Address the Socialized and Institutionalized Disregard for the LGBTQ Homeless Youth Population
    "Hey Faggot" Understanding that the Current Homeless System Planning Policy, and Land Use Planning Tools is not Designed to Address the Socialized and Institutionalized Disregard for the LGBTQ Homeless Youth Population
    Making up a disproportionate amount of the homeless youth population, LGBTQ homeless youth face a myriad of problems from increased depression and anxiety, emotional and belonging issues; higher rates of suicide, drug and alcohol abuse; and higher rates of STI and heath problems associated with increased rates of survival sex.The findings, derived from a literature review, a review of current policies and land use planning tools in Toronto, interviews with two frontline homeless service providers and two policy workers, have brought to light areas where the profession of urban planning can contribute to reform the current system of shelter and support facilities.Through language and skills training, provincial and municipal policy on housing and homelessness, land use planning tools of zoning by-­‐laws and public consultations and the siting of facilities, and political backing, urban planning can help to aid in the provision of services for LGBTQ homeless youth.
    "I don't have a creative bone in my body" : awakening creativity in educators
    "I don't have a creative bone in my body" : awakening creativity in educators
    Creativity is regarded as the solution to problems of the twenty-first century. Without developing creative attitudes and skills, educators and children risk hindering their creative interests and limiting the number of ways there is to learn and respond to the world. This qualitative study aimed to address the symbiotic relationship between creativity and learning and how creativity is conceptualized and encouraged by educators. Using an unstructured open-ended interview, six educators actively involved in the field of Early Childhood Studies shared their thoughts, insights and expertise. The findings indicated that before educators can encourage creativity in their students they must initially identify creativity within themselves. By broadening personal definitions of creativity, educators can begin to recognize how encouraging and teaching for creativity allows children to define their own proximities of learning and imagine the impossible as possible.
    "I don't want to go back" : the complicated case of Polish displaced children to Canada in 1949
    "I don't want to go back" : the complicated case of Polish displaced children to Canada in 1949
    On September 7, 1949, a group of 123 Polish displaced children from Tengeru Camp in Tanganyika (Tanzania) arrived in Halifax on board the U.S. Army transport, the General Heitzelman. The Canadian government accepted these children on the assumption that they were all orphans, but shortly after their arrival, the Communist regime in Warsaw accused Canada of kidnapping the children and demanded their immediate repatriation claiming that some of them had parents and relatives living in Poland. This paper examines the diplomatic row between the Canadian and Polish governments over the resettlement of these children and argues that the Canadian authorities assessed the problem from a more balanced and less ideological point of view while taking into account the interests of the children and a humanitarian image of Canada.
    "I want to find a better place" : Assyrian immigrant women and English-language acquisition
    "I want to find a better place" : Assyrian immigrant women and English-language acquisition
    Canada's point system has helped ensure that many immigrants, both men and women, are fluent in English upon arrival (Kilbride et. al, 2008.) Consequently, research has indicated that those who enter as sponsored or dependent family members, the majority of whom are adult women, arrive with limited fluency in English. A qualitative research approach, including two focus-group interviews with seven Assyrian immigrant women helped identify factors that have stymied or facilitated their successful acquisition of English. Conceptualizing the relationship between the langugae learner and the social world, a feminist poststructural theory (Weedon, 1997) provided a glimpse in the ways in which proficiency or, lack thereof in English has impacted the lives of Assyrian immigrant women in the areas of work, family and well-being. The findings suggest there are needs specific to each ethno-linguisitc group and that a one-size-fits-all approach in English programming does not help address these differences.
    "If Only I Didn't Embarrass Myself in Front of the Class!" Social Anxiety and Upward Counterfactual Thinking
    "If Only I Didn't Embarrass Myself in Front of the Class!" Social Anxiety and Upward Counterfactual Thinking
    This study examined the relationship between social anxiety (SA) and the generation of upward counterfactual thoughts (U-CFT; ―if only...‖ thoughts imagining better outcomes to past events). U-CFT has been associated with negative affect and with social anxiety in past research (e.g., Kocovski et al., 2005). Participants (n= 89) were randomly assigned to generate U-CFT in response to a controllable or uncontrollable social-evaluative scenario. When comparing those with extreme SA scores, those higher in SA generated a greater number of upward as compared with downward CFTs. A significant positive correlation between SA and U-CFT was found when examining subsets of the sample (i.e., those in the controllable scenario, students). Potential mediators between SA and CFT were examined. Postevent Processing emerged as the only significant mediator (among students only). There was no evidence of maladaptive CFT (i.e., in response to the uncontrollable scenario only) within subsets or the sample as a whole.
    "If only I had known...": young peoples participation in the construction of their learning disabilities
    "If only I had known...": young peoples participation in the construction of their learning disabilities
    This paper explores how young people participate in the construction of their learning disabilities and how the experience impacts their internal truth, and self-concept. The results show that none of the interviewee subjects in the study participated in the Identification Placement and Review Committee (IPRC) meetings conducted in Ontario. The interviewees did participate in a variety of other forums such as psychological testing, university development centers, and conversations with family members, and teachers. Analysis of coded qualitative interviews reveals four major themes that were interwoven: internal truth of self-concept about disability; external truths of individuals of self-conceptualization about disability; knowledge of disability; and participation in the construction of the label of disability. The children’s rights framework and the new sociology of childhood are used to explore the construction of self-concept for children and young people with disabilities, and the nature and timing of their participation in matters regarding them and their label of exceptionality in the Ontario education system. Keywords: self-concept, participation, learning disability, exceptionality, young people, construction of labels.
    "Leni Riefenstahl simply will not go away:" an analysis of the media discourses about Hitler's filmmaker
    "Leni Riefenstahl simply will not go away:" an analysis of the media discourses about Hitler's filmmaker
    Leni Riefenstahl will forever be connected to the political ideology of fascism and the images of Adolf Hitler and male strength and beauty she brought to the screen in Triumph of the Will (1935) and Olympia (1938), the contested masterpieces of her filmmaking career under the Third Reich. Now 100 years old and releasing her first film in almost half a century, she has remained a ubiquitous media presence for most of her life. In the 1 970s, an article in Newsweek began: "Leni Riefenstahl simply will not go away" and her media presence has only increased since that time ("Leni's triumph of the will" 11/29/76). More recently, in the past decade, Vanity Fair featured an interview with Riefenstahl and published Helmut Newton's photographs of her; lengthy reviews of her memoirs appeared in the New York Times, the Globe and Mail, and the Times of London; Ray Muller's documentary, The Wonderful, Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl appeared at film festivals in New York and Washington, D.C.; and Jodie Foster's decision to make a film based on Riefenstahl's life was announced on CNN. This media attention prompted Eric Rentschler to describe Riefenstahl as "the Third Reich's most visible living celebrity and a constant object oflurid speculation, be it as 'Hitler's girlfriend,' a 'Nazi pin-up girl,' or a 'fallen goddess.' The spectacle of Riefenstahl has always made for good press" (1996: 27-8). This paper examines the media's enduring fascination with Riefenstahl by analyzing articles devoted to the filmmaker's life and work that have appeared in Western newspapers, popular journals and on the Internet over the course of the past three decades.
    "Nannies strike back": the representation of live-in caregivers and the Live-in Caregiver Program in the mainstream and ethnic press
    "Nannies strike back": the representation of live-in caregivers and the Live-in Caregiver Program in the mainstream and ethnic press
    Utilizing Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), this study examines the representation of live-in caregivers (LC) and the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP), between 2007 and 2013, in eleven mainstream Canadian newspapers (N=32) and five Filipino-Canadian newspapers (N=31). It contributes to the extant media analyses on the LCP by including the perspective of the ethnic press, and, thus, the voices of LC, LC advocates, and members of the Filipino community. It also examines the recent hype surrounding the emergence of au pairing as a suitable caregiving option for Canadian families in light of the declining number of LC following the April 1, 2010 reforms to the LCP. This study concludes that the mainstream Canadian press portrayal of LC and their children is congruous with the "Problem Approach," while that in the ethnic newspapers is congruous with the "Agency Approach," providing a space to both empower LC and resist negative mainstream portrayals.
    "Photographic encounters : 30 years of collecting" : a case study for the organization of photographic exhibitions
    "Photographic encounters : 30 years of collecting" : a case study for the organization of photographic exhibitions
    The present Professional Practice Project is aimed to be an analytical review of the process of organizing an exhibition. From conception to proposal writing, "Photographic Encounters: 30 Years of Collecting" is a review of all the steps and the methods followed to put together an exhibition. This work aims to be a tool for those who would like to organize photographic exhibitions and will serve as a methodological approach to curatorial practices; starting with the cataloguing of the collection it will cover every step of the way including conceiving the database, reproducing images, background research, curatorial decisions (such as which pieces will be part of the selection, in which order, how to group them), the layout of the gallery, some guidelines on future graphic design, and selected readings on curatorial practices, exhibition design, databases, cataloguing, etc. At the end, the discussion chapter will refer to other curators' approaches to the same tasks, to illustrate different approaches.
    "Sharing power" : representation of visible minorities on the boards of selected immigrant serving agencies in Peel
    "Sharing power" : representation of visible minorities on the boards of selected immigrant serving agencies in Peel
    This study analyzes patterns of racial minority representation on the Boards of immigrant serving agencies (ISAs) in the cities of Mississauga and Brampton in the Region of Peel, Ontario. Executive Directors of 13 organizations were contacted and asked to provide ethnic, gender, age and educational information on the composition of their Boards and to describe the ethnic make-up of the client populations they serve. Boards were then scored on diversity (numbers of different ethnic members on the Board) and representativeness (a comparison of the ethnic composition of the Boards to the ethnic make-up of the population served by their ISAs). Findings indicate a wide range of scores on both diversity and representativeness. Some Boards are fully homogeneous and unrepresentative of their clients. Others are diverse but unrepresentative, and still others are fully representative of their client populations.
    "So, you want a database? : a beginner's guide to database technology for small cultural institutions"
    "So, you want a database? : a beginner's guide to database technology for small cultural institutions"
    This thesis project is comprised of a twenty page folded booklet and ten page analytical paper. The booklet is meant as a beginner's guide to collections management systems within cultural institutions. Its primary audience is smaller institutions that may not have the benefit of staff with expert or prior knowledge of electronic databases and collections management systems. The booklet outlines what a database is, why collection management systems are important, a frequently asked question section, a glossary and an additional resource page. The frequently asked questions section gives examples of why database management systems are important and how to choose a collections managament system, along with other commonly asked questions.