Theses

  • 15476
  • 0
  • Traffic engineering friendly request routing in content delivery network
    Traffic engineering friendly request routing in content delivery network
    Content delivery over Internet is optimized for low use perceived latency by designing specialized Content Distribution Network (CDN). Content servers are connected through a content switch the distributes client requests among them to achieve load balancing across the servers. The content switch is located one-hop away from the servers. Server load balancing is one factor in achieveing low user perceived latency and improving operational efficiency. Traffic engineering is another factor that is generally and integrated with serverload balancing for CDN optimization. In this thesis we propose a request routing algorithm for a CDN that was designed to integrate server selection and traffic engineering functions in the request routing system. The CDN employs MPLS in the network for traffic engineering. The proposed algorithm optimizes content delivery for user perceived latency by achieving server load balancing and network traffic loan manaement among alternative paths. It also improves operational efficiency of the CDN by eliminating bottleneck paths and increasing utilization of underutilized servers and paths.
    Trajectory Analysis on Spherical Self-Organizing Maps With Application to Gesture Recognition
    Trajectory Analysis on Spherical Self-Organizing Maps With Application to Gesture Recognition
    In this work, a new approach to gesture recognition using the properties of Spherical Self- Organizing Map (SSOM) is investigated. Bounded mapping of data onto a SSOM creates not only a powerful tool for visualization but also for modeling spatiotemporal information of gesture data. The SSOM allows for the automated decomposition of a variety of gestures into a set of distinct postures. The decomposition naturally organizes this set into a spatial map that preserves associations between postures, upon which we formalize the notion of a gesture as a trajectory through learned posture space. Trajectories from different gestures may share postures. However, the path traversed through posture space is relatively unique. Different variations of posture transitions occurring within a gesture trajectory are used to classify new unknown gestures. Four mechanisms for detecting the occurrence of a trajectory of an unknown gesture are proposed and evaluated on two data sets involving both hand gestures (public sign language database) and full body gestures (Microsoft Kinect database collected in-house) showing the effectiveness of the proposed approach.
    Trajectory based market models with operational assumptions
    Trajectory based market models with operational assumptions
    Mathematical finance makes use of stochastic processes to model sources of uncertainty in market prices. Such models have helped in the assessment of many financial situations. These approaches impose the stochastic process a priori which is then fitted to data. Hence, unchecked hypotheses can creep into the formalism and observable phenomena plays little role in building the model fundamentals. We attempt to reverse the procedure in order to include presumably more realistic price movements. Operational assumptions are used to construct a trajectory set relating discrete chart properties with investors' portfolio re-balancing preferences. By identifying features of these trajectories we can construct models that capture different sources of risk and use a geometric procedure to produce replication bounds for a contingent claim. Why a future unfolding chart fails to belong to the proposed trajectory set is testable. A preliminary risk-reward analysis based on this is also developed.
    Transfer of the Catabolic Plasmid Pjp4 in Bacterial Biofilms in Lab-Scale Continuous Flow-Through Cells
    Transfer of the Catabolic Plasmid Pjp4 in Bacterial Biofilms in Lab-Scale Continuous Flow-Through Cells
    Limited information is available on how external environmental factors (e.g., the type of carbon source) affect biofilm architecture, conjugative transfer of the plasmid pJP4 and xenobiotic degradation in biofilms. The aim of this project was to investigate the influence of glucose and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, two different carbon sources which represent the absence and presence of selective pressure, respectively, on the combined effect of biofilm architecture, transfer of the plasmid pJP4 in soil derived mixed culture biofilms and consequent biodegradation of 2,4-D. The pJP4 plasmid was transferred to soil-derived mixed culture recipients in plate mating experiments and isolated transconjugant colonies were characterized as Comamonas testosteroni. Donor and transconjugant cells were not detected microscopically in biofilms and no transconjugant colonies were isolated; however, gfp, dsRed, and tfdB genes were detected in biofilm effluents with and without selective pressure. Heterogeneous biofilm architecture was observed for both with and without selective pressure.
    Transformation as a type: seeking a flexible housing type for the 21st century
    Transformation as a type: seeking a flexible housing type for the 21st century
    Rapid social and technological change have largely influenced the way in which individuals and families inhabit their dwellings, leading to new functional and formal lifestyle demands within the domestic realm. “The current information society is more closely linked to time than space. Its networks produce systems that are discontinuous in space but continuous in time…the most consistent systems are those capable of distributing their activities homogeneously in time, thus avoiding the generation of another parallel space…specifically for one concrete use.” (Guallart, 2004, p.25) In a time where change and transformation are omnipresent and highly influential, how can we design habitats that respond directly to the changing social order, by transforming into the appropriate space which supports the changing occupants, activities, and functions of a home? This thesis proposes a flexible housing typology, which has the ability to transform and adapt to socio-cultural and technological changes over time.
    Transgressive actions and the production of public space : policy, people and urban space in Winnipeg's downtown
    Transgressive actions and the production of public space : policy, people and urban space in Winnipeg's downtown
    Public space is planned space. The discourse that takes place among federal, municipal and local governments, as well as the interaction that takes place on the street between people, informs the agenda and values inherent in policy and social norms. Urban revitalization strategies and city bylaws produce public and private spaces, thereby informing the cityscape within which everyone interacts. This study examines the contribution, circulation and regulation of transgressive actions in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, in order to consider what these actions reveal about power relations in the urban environment and the production of public space. This research uses both a policy case study and urban theory to investigate the means by which public and private spaces are produced and imbued with the ideologies that shape and maintain these spaces in Winnipeg's downtown area.
    Transit-Oriented Development: Removing Barriers And Realizing Goals Through LEED-ND
    Transit-Oriented Development: Removing Barriers And Realizing Goals Through LEED-ND
    In a response to the effects of sprawl and the growth pressures that face the City of Toronto and the rest of the Province of Ontario, Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) can be implemented as a smart growth tool that can provide a meaningful sustainable alternative to conventional development practices. This research paper explores TOD in all of its capacities, context, design principles and the benefits and barriers that encourage or inhibit its execution. With a lack of effective performance measures in the current literature, this report aims to respond to the question: Can LEED-ND assist in addressing the main goals, objectives and barriers of TOD? LEED-ND is a rating system that shares the same smartgrowth and new urbanist concepts as TOD. The various categories of the LEED-ND system help to analyze TODs by more than just design elements and instead help to put focus on the sustainable and social objectives.
    Transitional Architecture: A Temporary Architectural System for De-Industrializing Waterfronts
    Transitional Architecture: A Temporary Architectural System for De-Industrializing Waterfronts
    The following thesis began as an investigation into port cities that lie in the limbo between industrial and post-industrial. It questions the role of architecture during this stage of transition. The research brought forth a vision of infrastructural re-use and reversible architecture, aimed to address the indeterminate and environmental condition of de-industrialized contexts. Essentially this thesis envisions the reactivation of wasted rail and manufacturing infrastructure present among industrial-port cities. They are to become a supply chain network, producing temporary architecture. Areas of high rail density such as rail yards and industrial piers thus act as incubators of the future era; served by a reversible architecture. These communities become the focus of the city's redevelopment efforts while resisting the pressure of permanent, large scale redevelopments. As the transition from industrial to post-industrial nears stabilization, more permanent solutions will begin to emerge while the architecture may move on to serve another context.
    Transnational Habitus and Patriarchy in Indian Immigrant Fiction: an Analysis of the Immigrant By Manju Kapur
    Transnational Habitus and Patriarchy in Indian Immigrant Fiction: an Analysis of the Immigrant By Manju Kapur
    This major research paper is an analysis of a fictional novel, The Immigrant by Manju Kapur, using the two main themes of transnational habitus and patriarchy as reflected in the novel. This paper aims to understand how one immigrant woman‟s identities are transformed within her transnational habitus. Although relatively stereotypical of the issues that prevail through Indian immigrant fiction, the above reinforces the issues immigrant women face and calls to attention the need for these issues to be acknowledged and addressed.
    Transnational Habitus and the Formation of a Colombian Community in Toronto
    Transnational Habitus and the Formation of a Colombian Community in Toronto
    Colombians are one of the largest Latin American populations in Canada, however academic research on this ethnic group is scarce. Unlike other immigrant groups from Latin America, Colombians demonstrate limited community formation. This study seeks to explore the reasons that impede the formation of a Colombian community in Toronto. Using transnational habitus as a theoretical framework, and using census data analysis as well as field observations in the Toronto CMA, the study suggests that multiple political conflicts in Colombia have been transplanted to Canada, thereby impeding the formation of a solidified community.
    Transnational communities : Filipina nurses in rural Manitoba, 1965-1970
    Transnational communities : Filipina nurses in rural Manitoba, 1965-1970
    This major research paper examines a unique group of Filipina nurses of the 1960s in Canada's immigration history. First, the conditions that encouraged the migration of Filipino professionals from the Philippines after World War Two are discussed. Second, the public and private sector maneuverings that facilitated the nurses' transportation to Canada are revealed. Third, the factors and experiences that resulted in the women's successful integration into mainstream rural Canada are explored. The achievement of Filipina nurses is indicative of a model example of social and professional integration into Canadian society.
    Transnational governance and its impact on the settlement process of Eritrean refugees in Canada
    Transnational governance and its impact on the settlement process of Eritrean refugees in Canada
    This paper will examine the transnational governance and its impact on the settlement process of Eritrean refugees. It will pose three questions: 1) What kind of challenges do Eritrean refugees face in the process of their resettlement? 2) How do the illegal activities of the Eritrean consulate disrupt their settlement process? 3) What difficulties do newcomers have in accessing law enforcement authorities? The paper will focus on the cases of Eritrean immigrants in Canada and investigate how the state of their country of origin continues to affect their day to day life in the country of reception and particularly how the home state regulates the flow of money and works to silence its critics. The paper further will investigate how the activities of Eritrean government can undermine Canadian sovereignty and leave refugees defenseless. Although the analysis is based on the experiences of Eritrea and its refugees in Canada, the paper will argue that such transnational governance can emasculate the autonomy of any country that hosts refugees or immigrants.