Theses

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  • What Empowers or Disempowers Sikh Women After Migrating To Ontario, Canada?
    What Empowers or Disempowers Sikh Women After Migrating To Ontario, Canada?
    Sikh women are known for their valour and bravery in India. But many negative stereotypes are attached to their identity in Canada. They are often labelled as submissive and docile. This research has focused on empowering and disempowering factors experienced by Sikh women in Ontario, Canada. There is a substantial amount of literature on South Asian women’s experiences but there is a lack of literature, particularly focusing on Sikh women’s empowerment. In this study in person interviews were conducted with three Sikh women who were between the ages of 30-40 years and have immigrated to Canada from Punjab, India and have lived in Ontario for five years or more. Qualitative research was conducted using a narrative methodology. Recruitment emails were used to select study participants. The goal of this research is to add to existing social work literature. Findings will aid settlement agencies in understanding the needs of Sikh women, after they migrate to Canada and what challenges are faced by them. This, in turn, will help settlement workers to provide culturally competent support to Sikh women. This study will also help challenge some of the negative myths about Sikh women.
    What I Should Have Learned In School : Making The Connection Between Land Use Planning & The Duty To Consult
    What I Should Have Learned In School : Making The Connection Between Land Use Planning & The Duty To Consult
    This major research paper examines whether land use planning in Canada incorporates Aboriginal and treaty rights into its processes, by way of integrating the duty to consult, as well as to examine whether planning education teaches students about these issues. By examining literature and policy, and conducting interviews with planners, planning faculty, archaeologists and legal practitioners, this research sheds light on where the duty to consult First Nations intersects with land use planning in Ontario. The paper concludes with two recommendations: first, changes must be made to municipal land use planning in Ontario, and by extension the rest of Canada; second, foundational planning curriculum must provide planning students with knowledge of Aboriginal and treaty rights and land use planning.
    What Will The Legacy Of The Pan American And Parapan Games 2015 Be For Toronto? Looking At Past Successes And Failures To Inform Toronto's Experience
    What Will The Legacy Of The Pan American And Parapan Games 2015 Be For Toronto? Looking At Past Successes And Failures To Inform Toronto's Experience
    The 2015 Pan American and Parapan American Games will be hosted in Toronto. The Athletes’ Village is being constructed in the West Don Lands and post Games will be transformed into a mixed-use community. Due to the scale of the project and brief duration of the Games, the creation of this new neighbourhood in Toronto is a sizeable undertaking but has the potential to accommodate Toronto’s anticipated growth and serve to connect the Waterfront from east to west.The central issue for this paper is identifying the legacy aspects of the Athletes’ Village and how stakeholders can work to mitigate any potential negative impacts identified. The investigation will focus on the social, environmental and economic impacts. Recommendations for stakeholders are presented based on the research approach which included interviews, a review of literature as well as case studies of previous sporting events in Winnipeg, Vancouver, Calgary, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and Guadalajara, Mexico.
    What You Say Matters: The Influence Of Alibi Content On Memory And Forensically Relevant Judgments
    What You Say Matters: The Influence Of Alibi Content On Memory And Forensically Relevant Judgments
    Discussion of alibi believability has typically focused on the influence of the strength of the corroborating evidence. Little is known about the influence of the content of alibi narratives on legal judgments. The current studies explored the role of moral desirability of alibi activities on judgments about an alibi, the strength of the evidence against a suspect, and the probability of the suspect’s guilt as well as on recall performance. The role of Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and the alibi context were also evaluated. Alibi content did not affect judgments about alibis or evidence, but did influence perceptions of probability of suspect guilt. Morally undesirable and desirable alibis were both more memorable than neutral alibis. RWA was related to participants’ decisions regarding the alibi, the physical evidence, and the suspect’s likelihood of guilt. Finally, statements described as alibis were viewed with greater skepticism than statements described as narratives.
    What factors contribute to the effectiveness of public service delivery networks? : the case of community networks of specialized care in Ontario
    What factors contribute to the effectiveness of public service delivery networks? : the case of community networks of specialized care in Ontario
    The public administration literature in support of network governance has grown in the past two decades. Some empirical evidence suggests that if a range of public services are integrated through a network of service providers, a more coordinated seamless service system will be created, reducing fragmentation, gaps, and replication of services, and increasing capacity to plan for and address complex problems with improved client outcomes. There is limited empirical evidence about the factors that contribute to the effectiveness of public service delivery networks. The Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services moved to a network model of service delivery in 2005 to address the needs of citizens with developmental disabilities and mental health/behaviour problems. Using secondary sources and key informant interviews, this research analyzes the factors that contribute to the effectiveness of social service delivery networks by examining Community Networks of Specialized Care in Ontario four years after implementation.
    What is the Food Network feeding us? : questioning the Food Network's representation of the food industry
    What is the Food Network feeding us? : questioning the Food Network's representation of the food industry
    Today, the television Food Network is one of the most popular sources of food knowledge. Although it may be perceived simplistically as a recipe resource for aspiring home chefs it represents much more. Through analyses of the Food Network programming this work examines the network's representations of our food ways. More specifically, portrayals of the food industry are explored. It is argued that the network is steeped in nostalgic longing for a traditional value system which emphasizes family and home. This focus on family, community and small scale food preparation eliminates problematic aspects of our food production, distribution and consumption systems.
    What is there to Yelp about?
    What is there to Yelp about?
    This paper examines the use of language in user generated online product reviews on the website Yelp.ca. Using both Relevance Theory and the Co-operative Principle this study identifies nine linguistic devices to analyze within restaurant reviews on this website. Yelp.ca administrators identify some reviewers as “Elite Reviewers.” This study contrasted twenty-five Elite reviews with twenty-five Non-Elite reviews in order to determine which linguistic devices were more prevalent within Elite reviews. The findings illustrate that there are concrete differences between these two types of reviews. Assuming that Elite Reviews are in fact more persuasive, these findings suggest that there may be concrete attributes of a review that make it more persuasive in an online, user generated context.
    What to expect? : examining the role of pre-departure cultural orientations
    What to expect? : examining the role of pre-departure cultural orientations
    Providing relevant pre-migration information for newcomers to Canada can have many potential benefits, however there is a gap in understanding the implications of pre-departure cultural orientations (P-DCO) on refugee settlement. This research focuses on the unique resettlement experiences of privately sponsored refugees entering Canada through the Student Refugee Program (SRP). The purpose of this research is to understand how P-DCO impacts the resettlement of SRP participants and identify the effectiveness of such programs. The study uses the theoretical lens of cultural and social capital to understand the role of P-DCO in the migration and resettlement of SRP participants. Individual interviews were conducted with 6 SRP participants, as well as a key informant interview with the SRP Senior Program Officer. This exploratory study contributes to an enhanced understanding of the effectiveness of P-DCO for refugees in their resettlement and advocates further research for other immigrant categories.
    What's Up? Creating The Next Generation Of Engaged Urban Citizens: Examining The High School Geography Curriculum In Ontario For Education On Urban Planning Issues
    What's Up? Creating The Next Generation Of Engaged Urban Citizens: Examining The High School Geography Curriculum In Ontario For Education On Urban Planning Issues
    The consequences of planning issues like suburban sprawl are well-known in academia and the planning profession, however there is a disconnect between this knowledge and the actions of decision-makers, as well as, the populations who elect them. It is argued that if students in Ontario were better informed or knowledgeable about urban planning issues within the high school curricula, then there could be a stronger framework for which to improve upon planning urban regions according to best practices and principles. A focus is placed on geography education and the provincial geography curriculum due to it having the strongest potential for inclusion of this topic. Through a literature review and semi-structured interviews with educators and planners, this paper examines the current geography curriculum, best practices, as well as the barriers to incorporating urban planning issues into high school geography classrooms. Lastly, recommendations are provided for stakeholders in the planning and geography education professions on how to overcome these barriers.
    What's love got to do with it?: an analysis of the narrative portrayals and ideologies of romantic love in the neo-traditional romantic comedy.
    What's love got to do with it?: an analysis of the narrative portrayals and ideologies of romantic love in the neo-traditional romantic comedy.
    "Romantic love has been, and continues to be, the subject of diverse discussions in a variety of realms, including but not limited to, philosophy, psychology and anthropology. Despite the depth and range of such discussions, as a concept, romantic love remains an enigmatic phenomenon. Love may be knowable and comprehensible to others, as understood in the phrases, "I am in love", "I love you", but it is often felt, most notably by the humanities academic community, that what "love" means in these sentences cannot be analyzed further. This is because the concept of "love" is perceived to be irreducible; an axiomatic, or self-evident, state of affairs that warrants no further intellectual intrusion. In attempting to define love therefore, we stumble across the philosophical questions of how we may know love, how we may understand it and whether it is possible or plausible to make statements about being in love if love is purely an emotional condition. In light of these concerns it is necessary to assert that there is a difference between the claim that love cannot be examined and the claim that it should not be subject to examination out of a sense of reverence for its mysteriousness, its awesome, divine, or romantic nature.
    What’s News Got to Do with It?: Examining the Contribution of Toronto’s Press in Maintaining an Environmentally-Detrimental Social Paradigm, 2003-2006
    What’s News Got to Do with It?: Examining the Contribution of Toronto’s Press in Maintaining an Environmentally-Detrimental Social Paradigm, 2003-2006
    This content analysis examines print media coverage of Toronto's waterfront development to determine whether story frames perpetuate the dominant social paradigm. Articles from 8 newspapers are analysed in two content dimensions, the sub-issues which surround waterfront development and the ways of understanding the environment presented as relevant to Toronto's waterfront development. Findings show presence of conflict, use of a non-routine information channel and broad source mix do not result in more diverse content. Likewise, characteristics such as a news organization's conventionality (i.e., alternative or mainstream), size and ownership (i.e., independent or group-owned) exert limited influence over story content. Organized around the competitive city concept described by Kipfer and Keil's (2002), this research examines whether media coverage aligns with the capitalist urbanization process, concluding story frames in news discourse de-emphasize the environment as an issue and rely on the least-progressive environment paradigms when reporting on Toronto's waterfront development.