Theses

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  • “Nannies strike back”: the representation of live-in caregivers and the Live-in Caregiver Program  in the mainstream and ethnic press
    “Nannies strike back”: the representation of live-in caregivers and the Live-in Caregiver Program in the mainstream and ethnic press
    Utilizing Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), this study examines the representation of live-in caregivers (LC) and the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP), between 2007 and 2013, in eleven mainstream Canadian newspapers (N=32) and five Filipino-Canadian newspapers (N=31). It contributes to the extant media analyses on the LCP by including the perspective of the ethnic press and, thus, the voices of LC, LC advocates, and members of the Filipino community. It also examines the recent hype surrounding the emergence of au pairing as a suitable caregiving option for Canadian families in light of the declining number of LC following the April 1, 2010 reforms to the LCP. This study concludes that the mainstream Canadian press portrayal of LC and their children is congruous with the “Problem Approach,” while that in the ethnic newspapers is congruous with the “Agency Approach” providing a space to both empower LC and resist negative mainstream portrayals.
    “Orgulhosamente Sós:” Recent Immigration to the Portuguese Republic
    “Orgulhosamente Sós:” Recent Immigration to the Portuguese Republic
    Immigration to the Portuguese Republic is a rather new phenomenon in a world where migratory patterns have become rather pedestrian. This paper analyzes the history of both Portuguese emigration and immigration to Portugal, and the role that international relations have played in both. It also demonstrates the social and governmental response to an increasing alien presence amongst the host society. It argues that racism is not an endemic issue in Portugal and that the host society, both its people and the government, have laboured to integrate newcomers into Portuguese society within a framework of Portugal's domestic needs, on the one hand, and her international commitments on the other.
    “Put It In Your Back Pocket”: Identity And Belonging Among Second Generation Racialized Canadians
    “Put It In Your Back Pocket”: Identity And Belonging Among Second Generation Racialized Canadians
    Through interviews with four second generation Canadians, this Major Research Paper explores identity and belonging among second generation children (aged 18-30) of racialized immigrants in Toronto, Canada. Primary research questions include: (i) How do these individuals describe their identity? (ii) Do they have a sense of belonging in Canada; why or why not? (iii) Do they experience discrimination based on their ethno-racial identity? (iv) How does this impact their self-identification as Canadian and sense of belonging? The findings show that second generation racialized Canadians appear to hold multiple identities, forming a hyphenated or hybridized identity in which racialized identity and language/accent figure prominently. They also appear to have situational identities, with their identities shifting depending on the following various situational factors: (i) their location (including the country, city, and environment they are in), (ii) the individuals they are surrounded by including who they are speaking to, and (iii) the goal(s) of the situation.
    “Shall we put the heart in now?” A comparative analysis between creature features and their single reel abridgements
    “Shall we put the heart in now?” A comparative analysis between creature features and their single reel abridgements
    Single reel abridgements of commercial feature films are entering moving image archives because home movie collections that contain them are slowly increasing in archival representation. The abridged commercial films occupy a liminal space in between sustained preservation efforts that focus on studio films and the current interest paid to preserving home movies. As a result, the abridged films are being neglected. The films’ liminal status stems from a dearth of information regarding their relationship to the original films and a clear definition of what they are narratively and aesthetically. After analyzing fourteen abridged horror and science fiction films found in the Ryerson Moving Image collection and comparing them to their original counterparts this project finds that the abridged films are heavily altered in terms of narrative, characters, and causality, and should be treated as individual objects instead of derivative works, thus absolving their liminal status.
    “The many tinted woods”: building online teacher resources with photography collections
    “The many tinted woods”: building online teacher resources with photography collections
    This thesis aims to answer the question: how can photography collections be used as interpretative tools to build visual and media literacy skills through creative learning opportunities aligned with the Ontario education curriculum? The project has two components: an analytical paper and a teacher resource – created according to the Art Gallery of Ontario standard – to introduce teachers to teaching with photographs through interdisciplinary lessons in the visual culture of Canada from 1860 to the early 1900s. An analysis of the Ontario curriculum documents, identifying both limitations and benefits, and aims to support grade 7 and 8 teachers in the classroom are included. Using Canadian photographs from the AGO’s collection unites arts education and visual literacy with core academic subjects by prompting students, through a range of activities to engage with the subjects, aesthetic elements, history and materials of photographic media, and thus to interpret daily life at this time.
    “Tolerated” and non-status persons‟ access to mental health support services: a comparison between Toronto, Canada and Aachen, Germany
    “Tolerated” and non-status persons‟ access to mental health support services: a comparison between Toronto, Canada and Aachen, Germany
    Using the theoretical framework of Identity Formation, this Major Research Paper (MRP) aims to explore the Post-national rights of “tolerated” or undocumented persons in Toronto and Aachen, and their access to necessary mental health services. The assumption is that the experiences of these groups are both traumatic and unique, often creating emotional, mental and physical stress. These forms of stress require various forms of treatment, from formal mental health evaluations, to informal group counselling or bonding with persons of similar experiences. This work takes three service providers in each city, discusses the perspectives and services available, and offers an analysis as to whether they provide the suitable and necessary care for “tolerated” or non-status persons. I will argue that social exclusion in the form of contestant enmity is utilized to deny full access to support services. Recent legal and policy changes in both countries will be accounted for, and recommendations given as to how the service providers and actors at the municipal level can move forward to provide the necessary services.
    “Walk Like the Heroes”: The Performed Identity of Bruce Springsteen and the Relationship to Contemporary Popular Music Performance
    “Walk Like the Heroes”: The Performed Identity of Bruce Springsteen and the Relationship to Contemporary Popular Music Performance
    This thesis examines the trend of contemporary popular musicians referencing and being compared to Bruce Springsteen. To do so, the work analyzes the performed social identity of Springsteen and its relationship to popular music performance, particularly in terms of understanding and assessing the motivations behind comparisons with Brian Fallon of The Gaslight Anthem, a band frequently though to represent Sprinsteen's influence. Two case studies were conducted to examine the performed personas of both artists, informed by theories of the communication of meaning and identity. Springsteen is found to portray a traditionally American, White, working class male, representative of the idealized image of early American republican philosophy. Alternately, Fallon is found to perform a similar social identity without the significant evocation of this republicanism. Comparisons between these artists are theorized as emerging from their use of similar identity representations and indicators of meaning, particularly in their communication of authenticity.
    “You Go, Girl:” How Facebook and Instagram impacted the post-feminist construction of Electric Forest’s Women’s Program
    “You Go, Girl:” How Facebook and Instagram impacted the post-feminist construction of Electric Forest’s Women’s Program
    In February of 2016, Electric Forest — a four-day electronic music festival from June 23-26 in Rothbury, Michigan —announced a women’s only program called Her Forest. The initiative’s aim was to facilitate feelings of “connection, inspiration, and comfort” (Weiner, 2016) amongst the festival’s female guests. This MRP draws from past research on influence and postfeminism to consider how the Electric Forest brand, as well as its online followers, constructed and discussed Her Forest via Facebook and Instagram. A directed qualitative analysis was applied to 21 of Electric Forest’s Facebook and Instagram posts and 110 associated user comments. The analysis emphasized the powerful impact that social media applications have on the way in which corporate messages are expressed, received, reshaped, supported, and challenged.