Theses

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  • Welcome to Canada?  A critical review and assessment of Canada's fast changing immigration policies.
    Welcome to Canada? A critical review and assessment of Canada's fast changing immigration policies.
    From July 1, 2012, until July 31, 2014, Canada's immigration system underwent significant transformations, and the changes are continuing at a very fast pace. These transformations and the ongoing changes have created a cloud of uncertainty for many prospect immigrants and unpredictability among policy analysts, non-state actors, scholars, and other stakeholders. While family reunification, economic migrants and refugees in the past have enabled Canada to step up as a global leader, today concerns are growing that recent policy shifts are making Canada less desirable, are unfair to migrant and their families, and are resulting in destruction of its international reputation and long held leadership in immigrant integration and settlement. The purpose of this paper is to build upon Alboim and Cohl's Maytree report and review both proposed and effective immigration policies that occurred between July 2012 and July 2014. Offering an in depth analysis regarding some of the major policy amendments and evaluate their potential impact on all involved parties.
    Welcome to Winkler! : rural immigration initiatives in Canada's western provinces
    Welcome to Winkler! : rural immigration initiatives in Canada's western provinces
    Through information available on the internet and interviews with program officials, 15 rural immigration initiatives and four provincial nominee programs in Canada's Western provinces were investigated to determine which factors contribute to successful attraction, integration, and retention of immigrants to rural areas. Initiatives targeted economic immigrants, and were provincially and/or municipally driven in order to accurately reflect specific gaps in the labour market. The receiving municipality must have the economic and social capacity for the immigrant, which includes the financial and political resources to provide settlement assistance, support of all community institutions, and a welcoming attitude shown towards immigrants. Targeting immigrants belonging to already-existing ethnic groups within the community minimizes the costs of formal settlement assistance while increasing the likelihood of the immigrants' social and political integration. The provincial nominee program is one such initiative incorporating all of these ingredients, and has gained greater use by the provinces and communities over time.
    Welcoming communities and immigrant integration in Newfoundland and Labrador
    Welcoming communities and immigrant integration in Newfoundland and Labrador
    The term 'welcoming community' has arisen within the field of immigration studies as a concept that seeks to address ways in which communities welcome and integrate immigrants. This paper explores the concept of a welcoming community and its impact on the social integration of immigrants to smaller centres, specifically to the City of St. John's in the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, using a social inclusion framework. Through an examination of the integration policies and programs undertaken in the Province and how immigrants interact with these services. I find the elements of a welcoming community exist in St. John's and that immigrants' frequency and intensity of contact with institutions that directly support settlement is high in St. John's. However, it is premature to conclude, given the recent implementation of the immigration policy in the Province and low numbers of contacts made with other institutions, that St. John's is a welcoming community and that this translates into successful social integration.
    Welcoming the Stranger: The Canadian Church and the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program
    Welcoming the Stranger: The Canadian Church and the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program
    Since the PSR program was founded in 1978, the Canadian church has portrayed a major role in the program. Many of the first sponsored refugees converted to the branch of Christianity that their sponsors practiced. Conversion was a mechanism for refugees to gain social capital and integrate into Canadian society. Today, sponsored refugees are able to tap into the rich diversity of religious communities found in urban Canadian centres and therefore are less likely to feel pressured to join their Christian sponsors in worship. This study demonstrates how the Canadian church has influenced the formation of the PSR program. The study provides an analysis of the role of Christianity in the identity formation of sponsored refugees and the inter-faith relationship between Christian sponsors and non-Christian refugees.
    We’re On A Mission From G-D: Thornhill As A Walkable Jewish Suburb
    We’re On A Mission From G-D: Thornhill As A Walkable Jewish Suburb
    Jewish Thornhill, located in Vaughan, York Region, was intentionally designed and planned as a walkable Jewish suburb. Though it is an auto-oriented suburb, Thornhill is also a walkable neighbourhood that caters to the distinct needs of its large Jewish community. Orthodox Jews require ready access to kosher food; they also require synagogues within walking distance as they do not drive cars or take transit on the Sabbath or Jewish holidays. The master planning of Thornhill was made possible by developers who recognized the Jewish community’s predictable migration pattern along Bathurst Street and purchased land in Thornhill two decades before the Jewish community had reached Thornhill. Topics that were researched for this paper included walkability, Toronto’s Jewish history, the intersection of religion and urban planning, and smart growth.
    What Empowers or Disempowers Sikh Women After Migrating To Ontario, Canada?
    What Empowers or Disempowers Sikh Women After Migrating To Ontario, Canada?
    Sikh women are known for their valour and bravery in India. But many negative stereotypes are attached to their identity in Canada. They are often labelled as submissive and docile. This research has focused on empowering and disempowering factors experienced by Sikh women in Ontario, Canada. There is a substantial amount of literature on South Asian women’s experiences but there is a lack of literature, particularly focusing on Sikh women’s empowerment. In this study in person interviews were conducted with three Sikh women who were between the ages of 30-40 years and have immigrated to Canada from Punjab, India and have lived in Ontario for five years or more. Qualitative research was conducted using a narrative methodology. Recruitment emails were used to select study participants. The goal of this research is to add to existing social work literature. Findings will aid settlement agencies in understanding the needs of Sikh women, after they migrate to Canada and what challenges are faced by them. This, in turn, will help settlement workers to provide culturally competent support to Sikh women. This study will also help challenge some of the negative myths about Sikh women.
    What I Should Have Learned In School : Making The Connection Between Land Use Planning & The Duty To Consult
    What I Should Have Learned In School : Making The Connection Between Land Use Planning & The Duty To Consult
    This major research paper examines whether land use planning in Canada incorporates Aboriginal and treaty rights into its processes, by way of integrating the duty to consult, as well as to examine whether planning education teaches students about these issues. By examining literature and policy, and conducting interviews with planners, planning faculty, archaeologists and legal practitioners, this research sheds light on where the duty to consult First Nations intersects with land use planning in Ontario. The paper concludes with two recommendations: first, changes must be made to municipal land use planning in Ontario, and by extension the rest of Canada; second, foundational planning curriculum must provide planning students with knowledge of Aboriginal and treaty rights and land use planning.
    What Will The Legacy Of The Pan American And Parapan Games 2015 Be For Toronto? Looking At Past Successes And Failures To Inform Toronto's Experience
    What Will The Legacy Of The Pan American And Parapan Games 2015 Be For Toronto? Looking At Past Successes And Failures To Inform Toronto's Experience
    The 2015 Pan American and Parapan American Games will be hosted in Toronto. The Athletes’ Village is being constructed in the West Don Lands and post Games will be transformed into a mixed-use community. Due to the scale of the project and brief duration of the Games, the creation of this new neighbourhood in Toronto is a sizeable undertaking but has the potential to accommodate Toronto’s anticipated growth and serve to connect the Waterfront from east to west.The central issue for this paper is identifying the legacy aspects of the Athletes’ Village and how stakeholders can work to mitigate any potential negative impacts identified. The investigation will focus on the social, environmental and economic impacts. Recommendations for stakeholders are presented based on the research approach which included interviews, a review of literature as well as case studies of previous sporting events in Winnipeg, Vancouver, Calgary, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and Guadalajara, Mexico.
    What You Say Matters: The Influence Of Alibi Content On Memory And Forensically Relevant Judgments
    What You Say Matters: The Influence Of Alibi Content On Memory And Forensically Relevant Judgments
    Discussion of alibi believability has typically focused on the influence of the strength of the corroborating evidence. Little is known about the influence of the content of alibi narratives on legal judgments. The current studies explored the role of moral desirability of alibi activities on judgments about an alibi, the strength of the evidence against a suspect, and the probability of the suspect’s guilt as well as on recall performance. The role of Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and the alibi context were also evaluated. Alibi content did not affect judgments about alibis or evidence, but did influence perceptions of probability of suspect guilt. Morally undesirable and desirable alibis were both more memorable than neutral alibis. RWA was related to participants’ decisions regarding the alibi, the physical evidence, and the suspect’s likelihood of guilt. Finally, statements described as alibis were viewed with greater skepticism than statements described as narratives.
    What factors contribute to the effectiveness of public service delivery networks? : the case of community networks of specialized care in Ontario
    What factors contribute to the effectiveness of public service delivery networks? : the case of community networks of specialized care in Ontario
    The public administration literature in support of network governance has grown in the past two decades. Some empirical evidence suggests that if a range of public services are integrated through a network of service providers, a more coordinated seamless service system will be created, reducing fragmentation, gaps, and replication of services, and increasing capacity to plan for and address complex problems with improved client outcomes. There is limited empirical evidence about the factors that contribute to the effectiveness of public service delivery networks. The Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services moved to a network model of service delivery in 2005 to address the needs of citizens with developmental disabilities and mental health/behaviour problems. Using secondary sources and key informant interviews, this research analyzes the factors that contribute to the effectiveness of social service delivery networks by examining Community Networks of Specialized Care in Ontario four years after implementation.
    What is the Food Network feeding us? : questioning the Food Network's representation of the food industry
    What is the Food Network feeding us? : questioning the Food Network's representation of the food industry
    Today, the television Food Network is one of the most popular sources of food knowledge. Although it may be perceived simplistically as a recipe resource for aspiring home chefs it represents much more. Through analyses of the Food Network programming this work examines the network's representations of our food ways. More specifically, portrayals of the food industry are explored. It is argued that the network is steeped in nostalgic longing for a traditional value system which emphasizes family and home. This focus on family, community and small scale food preparation eliminates problematic aspects of our food production, distribution and consumption systems.
    What is there to Yelp about?
    What is there to Yelp about?
    This paper examines the use of language in user generated online product reviews on the website Yelp.ca. Using both Relevance Theory and the Co-operative Principle this study identifies nine linguistic devices to analyze within restaurant reviews on this website. Yelp.ca administrators identify some reviewers as “Elite Reviewers.” This study contrasted twenty-five Elite reviews with twenty-five Non-Elite reviews in order to determine which linguistic devices were more prevalent within Elite reviews. The findings illustrate that there are concrete differences between these two types of reviews. Assuming that Elite Reviews are in fact more persuasive, these findings suggest that there may be concrete attributes of a review that make it more persuasive in an online, user generated context.