Theses

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  • “Shall we put the heart in now?” A comparative analysis between creature features and their single reel abridgements
    “Shall we put the heart in now?” A comparative analysis between creature features and their single reel abridgements
    Single reel abridgements of commercial feature films are entering moving image archives because home movie collections that contain them are slowly increasing in archival representation. The abridged commercial films occupy a liminal space in between sustained preservation efforts that focus on studio films and the current interest paid to preserving home movies. As a result, the abridged films are being neglected. The films’ liminal status stems from a dearth of information regarding their relationship to the original films and a clear definition of what they are narratively and aesthetically. After analyzing fourteen abridged horror and science fiction films found in the Ryerson Moving Image collection and comparing them to their original counterparts this project finds that the abridged films are heavily altered in terms of narrative, characters, and causality, and should be treated as individual objects instead of derivative works, thus absolving their liminal status.
    “The many tinted woods”: building online teacher resources with photography collections
    “The many tinted woods”: building online teacher resources with photography collections
    This thesis aims to answer the question: how can photography collections be used as interpretative tools to build visual and media literacy skills through creative learning opportunities aligned with the Ontario education curriculum? The project has two components: an analytical paper and a teacher resource – created according to the Art Gallery of Ontario standard – to introduce teachers to teaching with photographs through interdisciplinary lessons in the visual culture of Canada from 1860 to the early 1900s. An analysis of the Ontario curriculum documents, identifying both limitations and benefits, and aims to support grade 7 and 8 teachers in the classroom are included. Using Canadian photographs from the AGO’s collection unites arts education and visual literacy with core academic subjects by prompting students, through a range of activities to engage with the subjects, aesthetic elements, history and materials of photographic media, and thus to interpret daily life at this time.
    “This Prodigious Frightful Fall”: An Exploration of Tourist Images of Niagara Falls in Stereography and on Instagram
    “This Prodigious Frightful Fall”: An Exploration of Tourist Images of Niagara Falls in Stereography and on Instagram
    This thesis explores the development of tourist photography through stereography and Instagram utilizing Niagara Falls stereographs from three collections ranging in date from 1850-1905 and Instagram images geotagged to Prospect Point, Niagara Falls, New York, all posted in the same twenty-four hours from August 6-7, 2016. First, a literature survey explores the history of photography at Niagara Falls, the circulation of tourist imagery, and social media and the networked image. It then moves on to an early history of photography at Niagara Falls with an emphasis on stereographs. It continues into a brief history of social media and an explanation of the inner workings of Instagram. Finally, it concludes with comparisons of aesthetic choices, access, and circulation in stereographs and Instagram, all using the case study images. This thesis argues that Instagram follows the same photographic tradition as stereographs and serves many of the same purposes in tourist photography
    “Tolerated” and non-status persons‟ access to mental health support services: a comparison between Toronto, Canada and Aachen, Germany
    “Tolerated” and non-status persons‟ access to mental health support services: a comparison between Toronto, Canada and Aachen, Germany
    Using the theoretical framework of Identity Formation, this Major Research Paper (MRP) aims to explore the Post-national rights of “tolerated” or undocumented persons in Toronto and Aachen, and their access to necessary mental health services. The assumption is that the experiences of these groups are both traumatic and unique, often creating emotional, mental and physical stress. These forms of stress require various forms of treatment, from formal mental health evaluations, to informal group counselling or bonding with persons of similar experiences. This work takes three service providers in each city, discusses the perspectives and services available, and offers an analysis as to whether they provide the suitable and necessary care for “tolerated” or non-status persons. I will argue that social exclusion in the form of contestant enmity is utilized to deny full access to support services. Recent legal and policy changes in both countries will be accounted for, and recommendations given as to how the service providers and actors at the municipal level can move forward to provide the necessary services.
    “Walk Like the Heroes”: The Performed Identity of Bruce Springsteen and the Relationship to Contemporary Popular Music Performance
    “Walk Like the Heroes”: The Performed Identity of Bruce Springsteen and the Relationship to Contemporary Popular Music Performance
    This thesis examines the trend of contemporary popular musicians referencing and being compared to Bruce Springsteen. To do so, the work analyzes the performed social identity of Springsteen and its relationship to popular music performance, particularly in terms of understanding and assessing the motivations behind comparisons with Brian Fallon of The Gaslight Anthem, a band frequently though to represent Sprinsteen's influence. Two case studies were conducted to examine the performed personas of both artists, informed by theories of the communication of meaning and identity. Springsteen is found to portray a traditionally American, White, working class male, representative of the idealized image of early American republican philosophy. Alternately, Fallon is found to perform a similar social identity without the significant evocation of this republicanism. Comparisons between these artists are theorized as emerging from their use of similar identity representations and indicators of meaning, particularly in their communication of authenticity.
    “You Go, Girl:” How Facebook and Instagram impacted the post-feminist construction of Electric Forest’s Women’s Program
    “You Go, Girl:” How Facebook and Instagram impacted the post-feminist construction of Electric Forest’s Women’s Program
    In February of 2016, Electric Forest — a four-day electronic music festival from June 23-26 in Rothbury, Michigan —announced a women’s only program called Her Forest. The initiative’s aim was to facilitate feelings of “connection, inspiration, and comfort” (Weiner, 2016) amongst the festival’s female guests. This MRP draws from past research on influence and postfeminism to consider how the Electric Forest brand, as well as its online followers, constructed and discussed Her Forest via Facebook and Instagram. A directed qualitative analysis was applied to 21 of Electric Forest’s Facebook and Instagram posts and 110 associated user comments. The analysis emphasized the powerful impact that social media applications have on the way in which corporate messages are expressed, received, reshaped, supported, and challenged.