Research

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  • The first oxazoline adduct of Zn(acac)2: bis(acetylacetonato-j2O,O0)(2-phenyl-2- oxazoline-jN)zinc(II)
    The first oxazoline adduct of Zn(acac)2: bis(acetylacetonato-j2O,O0)(2-phenyl-2- oxazoline-jN)zinc(II)
    The title material, [Zn(C5H7O2)2(C9H9NO)], was synthesized by the treatment of bis(acetylacetonato)zinc(II) monohydrate with 2-phenyl-2-oxazoline. The Zn atom is coordinated by two chelating acetylacetonate groups and one oxazoline ligand in the apical position of a slightly distorted square-pyramidal metal–ligand geometry., Acta Crystallographica Section E, 2008. Structure Reports. doi:10.1107/S1600536808042712 Publisher URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2968008/pdf/e-65-0m103.pdf
    The freedom to explore: examining the influence of independent mobility on weekday, weekend and after-school physical activity behaviour in children living in urban and inner-suburban neighbourhoods of varying socioeconomic status
    The freedom to explore: examining the influence of independent mobility on weekday, weekend and after-school physical activity behaviour in children living in urban and inner-suburban neighbourhoods of varying socioeconomic status
    Background Children’s independent mobility (CIM) is critical to healthy development in childhood. The physical layout and social characteristics of neighbourhoods can impact opportunities for CIM. While global evidence is mounting on CIM, to the authors’ knowledge, Canadian data on CIM and related health outcomes (i.e., physical activity (PA) behaviour) are missing. The purpose of this study was to examine if CIM is related to multiple characteristics of accelerometry-measured PA behaviour (total PA, light PA, moderate-to-vigorous PA, time spent sedentary) and whether associations between CIM and PA behaviour systematically vary by place of residence, stratifying by gender and type of day/period (weekdays, after-school, weekend). Methods Participants were recruited through Project BEAT (Built Environment and Active Transport; http://www.beat.utoronto.ca). Children (n = 856) were stratified into four neighbourhood classifications based on the period of neighbourhood development (urban built environment (BE) (old BE) versus inner-suburban BE (new BE)) and socioeconomic status (SES; low SES and high SES). Physical activity was measured via accelerometry (ActiGraph GT1M). CIM was assessed via parental report and two categories were created (low CIM, n = 332; high CIM, n = 524). A series of two-factor ANOVAs were used to determine gender-specific differences in PA for weekdays, weekend days and the after-school period, according to level of CIM, across four neighbourhood classifications. Results Children who were granted at least some independent mobility (high CIM) had more positive PA profiles across the school week, during the after-school period, and over the weekend; they were also less sedentary. The influence of CIM on PA behaviour was particularly salient during the after-school period. Associations of CIM with PA varied by gender, and also by neighbourhood classification. CIM seemed to matter more in urban neighbourhoods for boys and suburban neighbourhoods for girls. Conclusion Our findings highlight the importance of independent mobility to multiple characteristics of children’s PA behaviour across the week. Furthermore, they emphasize that independent mobility-activity relationships need to be considered by gender and the type of neighbourhood independent mobility is offered in. Future work will focus on developing a predictive model of CIM that could be used to inform decision-making around alleviating barriers to CIM., Stone, M. R., Faulkner, G. E., Mitra, R., & Buliung, R. N. (2014). The freedom to explore: Examining the influence of independent mobility on weekday, weekend and after-school physical activity behaviour in children living in urban and inner-suburban neighbourhoods of varying socioeconomic status. The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11, 5. doi:10.1186/1479-5868-11-5
    The impact of facilities and service-based competition on Internet services provision in the Canadian Broadband Market
    The impact of facilities and service-based competition on Internet services provision in the Canadian Broadband Market
    A variety of studies have focused on the effect of competition in broadband markets on increasing broadband penetration rates. Few studies however have focused on the extent to which competition also results in innovation in the marketplace, as demonstrated by increased broadband speeds, and other improvements that provide value to broadband users. This paper considers the effectiveness of market competition as a means of encouraging broadband providers to offer innovative services that meet citizens’ increasing needs for affordable high quality and high speed broadband connectivity. The study focuses on the provision of broadband services in Canada, a country where consumers were early adopters of broadband and where the policy environment has encouraged competition in the broadband market from its inception. Drawing on data from the OECD and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), the paper demonstrates that Canada’s regulatory regime does not appear to be sufficient to enable a competitive marketplace that results in the provision of innovative broadband services., van Gorp, A., & Middleton, C.(2010). The Impact of Facilities and Service-Based Competition on Internet Services Provision in the Canadian Broadband Market. Telematics and Informatics, 27(3), 217-230. doi: 10.1016/j.tele.2009.12.001
    The influence of country of origin on engagement in self-care behaviours following heart surgery: A descriptive correlational study.
    The influence of country of origin on engagement in self-care behaviours following heart surgery: A descriptive correlational study.
    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine if an individual’s country of origin influenced performance of self-care behaviours after heart surgery. Background: Patients are required to perform self-care behaviours following cardiovascular surgery. Usual care encompasses a patient education initiative that addresses self-care behaviour performance. Within Canada, current heart surgery patient education efforts have been designed and evaluated using homogenous samples that self-identify their country of origin as England, Ireland, or Scotland. However, approximately, 42.6% of Canadian cardiovascular surgical patients self-identify their country of origin as India or China. Thus, current cardiovascular surgery patient education initiatives may not be applicable to all patients undergoing heart surgery, which may result in decreased patient outcomes such as performance of self-care behaviours. Design and methods: This descriptive study included a convenience sample of ninety patients who underwent heart surgery at one of two university affiliated teaching hospitals, representing individuals of diverse backgrounds. Point-biserial correlational analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between country of origin and performance of self-care behaviours. Results and conclusion: Findings indicate individuals who self identified their country of origin as England or Ireland were associated with a higher score on the number of self-care behaviours performed (p < .05) than individuals who self-identified other countries of origin. Self-care behaviours were taught using patient education materials that were designed based on feedback obtained from individuals whose country of origin was England or Ireland. Thus, this study provides preliminary evidence to suggest country of origin influences the amount of self-care behaviours individuals will perform. Relevance to clinical practice: Patient education initiatives should incorporate the values, beliefs, attitudes, and customs reflective of an individual’s country of origin to enhance the likelihood of producing desired outcomes., Fredericks, S. (online, 2012). The influence of country of origin on engagement in self-care behaviours following heart surgery: A descriptive correlational study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 21, 2202-2208. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04095.x
    The library as congenial space: the Saint Mary’s experience
    The library as congenial space: the Saint Mary’s experience
    The author, appointed University Librarian in 1999, saw that the library was not fulfilling its potential from the perspectives of congenial environment and student awareness. She used student marketing projects to examine perceptions of the Patrick Power Library, and develop ways of raising its profile within the university community. The tired-looking building, a product of the 1970s, undermined the quality of staff and services. She used the information gathered through the projects to enhance services as well as make the library a more welcoming and vibrant space to attract students, without a major infusion of funds. This article charts the development of the library over a two-year period., Online version of an article originally published as: Madeleine Lefebvre, (2002) "The library as congenial space: the Saint Mary’s experience", New Library World, Vol. 103 Iss: 1/2, pp.21 - 29. Publisher URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/03074800210415032
    The performative manifestation of a research identity: storying the Journey through poetry
    The performative manifestation of a research identity: storying the Journey through poetry
    Cultivating a research identity is an arduous journey. We are told to situate ourselves—know where we are coming from—but it is rare that people share their experiences and provide insight into a journey that indubitably shapes your research. In this performative piece, I shed light on my journey to a research identity. I provide an intimate portrayal of the blurring and temporal nature of research identities that is sometimes avoided and often unaccepted. In doing so, I hope to awaken new understandings and provide insight into what can be a direction(less) journey that leads to a sense of positioning. My journey is a tracing rendered through poetry-enhanced prose, which provides aesthetic sensibilities and the possibility for you to enter into and become caught up in our experience. As well, poetry and photography are bestowed in a way to illuminate the performative and dynamic place of my research identity and as a way to visualize and feel the story within this poetical telling. This is a manifestation of performative social science in which the voice is never solely mine and the identity is never conclusive as it continues to unfold and shift through the spaces I inhabit., Lapum, J. (2008). The Performative Manifestation of a Research Identity: Storying the Journey Through Poetry. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 9(2). Retrieved from http://www.qualitative-research.net/index.php/fqs/article/view/397
    The politics of ornament: remediation and/in The Evergreen
    The politics of ornament: remediation and/in The Evergreen
    In “towards a theory of the periodical genre,” Margaret Beetham observes that “the material characteristics of the periodical ... have consistently been central to its meaning” (22–23). In particular, Beetham emphasizes, “the elation of blocks of text to visual material is a crucial part of ” the periodical’s processes of signification and the reader’s experience of making meaning out of its time-stamped yet open-ended issues (24). While this theoretical position underlies much excellent critical work in periodical studies, it is less evident in the electronic repositories on which research in the field increasingly relies. In this paper, I examine what it might mean to inform our digitization practices with a theory of the periodical hypertext as a remediated object. Focusing on the specific editorial problem of periodical pages decorated with textual ornaments, I take as my case study The Evergreen: A Northern Seasonal (1895 to 1897), a Scottish magazine scheduled for markup and publication on The Yellow Nineties Online. Making remediated Celtic ornament a structural feature of its aesthetic design and an integral expression of its larger political agenda, the Evergreen reminds us of what is at stake if our own electronic remediation practices are not adequate to the periodical objects we study., "The Politics of Ornament: Remediation and/in The Evergreen" was first published in ESC: English Studies in Canada in the special issue on Magazines and/as Media: The Politics and Aesthetics of Periodical Form, vol 41, no. 1 (2015): 1-24.
    The potential impact of increased treatment rates for alcohol dependence in the United Kingdom in 2004
    The potential impact of increased treatment rates for alcohol dependence in the United Kingdom in 2004
    Alcohol consumption has been linked to a considerable burden of disease in the United Kingdom (UK), with most of this burden due to heavy drinking and Alcohol Dependence (AD). However, AD is undertreated in the UK, with only 8% of those individuals with AD being treated in England and only 6% of those individuals with AD being treated in Scotland. Thus, the objective of this paper is to quantify the deaths that would have been avoided in the UK in 2004 if the treatment rate for AD had been increased. Methods Data on the prevalence of AD, alcohol consumption, and mortality were obtained from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, the Global Information System on Alcohol and Health, and the 2004 Global Burden of Disease study respectively. Data on the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment and Motivational Interviewing/Cognitive Behavioural Therapy were obtained from Cochrane reviews and meta-analyses. Simulations were used to model the number of deaths under different treatment scenarios. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model the effects of Brief Interventions and to examine the effect of using AD prevalence data obtained from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Results In the UK, 320 female and 1,385 male deaths would have been avoided if treatment coverage of pharmacological treatment had been increased to 20%. This decrease in the number of deaths represents 7.9% of all alcohol-attributable deaths (7.0% of all alcohol-attributable deaths for women and 8.1% of all alcohol-attributable deaths for men). If we used lower AD prevalence rates obtained from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, then treatment coverage of pharmacological treatment in hospitals for 20% of the population with AD would have resulted in the avoidance of 529 deaths in 2004 (99 deaths avoided for women and 430 deaths avoided for men). Conclusions Increasing AD treatment in the UK would have led to a large number of deaths being avoided in 2004. Increased AD treatment rates not only impact mortality but also impact upon the large burden of disability and morbidity attributable to AD, as well as the associated social and economic burdens., Shield, K. D., Rehm, J., Rehm, M. X., Gmel, G., & Drummond, C. (2014). The potential impact of increased treatment rates for alcohol dependence in the united kingdom in 2004. BMC Health Services Research, 14(1), 53-53. doi:10.1186/1472-6963-14-53
    The relationship between CABG patient characteristics and perceived learning needs: a secondary analysis
    The relationship between CABG patient characteristics and perceived learning needs: a secondary analysis
    Background: Patients’ learning needs are influenced by socio-cultural characteristics such as level of formal education, sex, and age. Limited research has examined this influence. Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to describe the number and type of learning needs identified, and 2) to examine the relationships between learning needs and socio-cultural characteristics (education, sex, and age). Design: This study was a sub-study of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) that evaluated the most appropriate time for delivering education to patients who had CABG surgery. Sample: Individuals having CABG with 1-4 grafts for the first time and who were literate and cognitively oriented to person, place, and time were included in this study. Analysis: Descriptive and correlation statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: A significant difference between learning needs and sex (p = 0.00) was noted, while a significant relationship between learning needs and age (p = 0.03) was identified. Conclusion: This study represents a first step towards identifying the association between perceived learning needs and socio-cultural characteristics., Fredericks, S. (2009). The relationship between CABG patient characteristics and perceived learning needs: a secondary analysis. Canadian Journal Of Cardiovascular Nursing, 19(1), 13-19.
    The role of the library in the first college year: the Canadian perspective
    The role of the library in the first college year: the Canadian perspective
    Purpose – The aims of this paper is to provide an overview on information literacy/library programs for first-year students in Canadian universities and colleges. Design/methodology/approach – The paper introduces and discusses periodical articles, monographs and up-to-date research on the subject. It presents anecdotal evidence gained from web site searches of 169 Canadian post-secondary institutions complemented by personal communications from library and student services staff. Findings – The study provides information about several types of library services for first-year students currently in use in Canadian academic libraries. Originality/value – There is no evidence of research in the area of library services for first-year college and university students in Canada. This paper complements research on information literacy/library programs offered through academic libraries in other countries by focusing solely on first-year student initiatives in Canadian academic libraries., Electronic copy of an article originally published in: Reference Services Review, 36 (3): 301-311, 2008. DOI: 10.1108/00907320810895387 Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited Publisher URL: www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/00907320810895387
    The spiral structure of Marshall McLuhan’s thinking
    The spiral structure of Marshall McLuhan’s thinking
    We examine the spiral structure of the thinking and the work of Marshall McLuhan, which we believe will provide a new way of viewing McLuhan’s work. In particular, we believe that the way he reversed figure and ground, reversed content and medium, reversed cause and effect, and the relationship he established between the content of a new medium and the older media it obsolesced all contain a spiral structure going back and forth in time. Finally, the time structure of his Laws of Media in which a new medium obsolesced an older medium, while retrieving an even older medium and then when pushed far enough flipped into a still newer medium has the feeling of a spiral. We will also examine the spiral structure of the thinking and work of those thinkers and artists that most influenced McLuhan such as Vico, Hegel, Marx, Freud, Joyce, TS Eliot, Wyndham Lewis and the Vorticism movement. Keywords: spiral; McLuhan; reversal; figure/ground; Laws of Media; media; environment/anti-environment; cause; effect, Pruska Oldenhof, I., & Logan, R. (2017). The spiral structure of Marshall McLuhan’s thinking. Philosophies, 2(2), 9., (This article belongs to the Special Issue The Philosophy of and the Philosophical Roots of Marshall McLuhan and the Media Ecology School)
    The standardization and harmonization of land cover classification systems towards harmonized datasets: A Review
    The standardization and harmonization of land cover classification systems towards harmonized datasets: A Review
    A number of national, regional and global land cover classification systems have been developed to meet specific user requirements for land cover mapping exercises, independent of scale, nomenclature and quality. However, this variety of land-cover classification systems limits the compatibility and comparability of land cover data. Furthermore, the current lack of interoperability between different land cover datasets, often stemming from incompatible land cover classification systems, makes analysis of multi-source, heterogeneous land cover data for various applications a very difficult task. This paper provides a critical review of the harmonization of land cover classification systems, which facilitates the generation, use and analysis of land cover maps consistently. Harmonization of existing land cover classification systems is essential to improve their cross-comparison and validation for understanding landscape patterns and changes. The paper reviews major land cover classification standards according to different scales, summarizes studies on harmonizing land cover mapping, and discusses some research problems that need to be solved and some future research directions. Keywords: land cover; classification system; standard; harmonization, Yang, H., Li, S., Chen, J., Zhang, X., & Xu, S. (2017). The Standardization and Harmonization of Land Cover Classification Systems towards Harmonized Datasets: A Review. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information, 6(6), 154., (This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis and Applications of Global Land Cover Data)