Research

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  • Wavelength-Switchable Dissipative Soliton Fiber Laser With a Chirped Fiber Grating Stop-Band Filter
    Wavelength-Switchable Dissipative Soliton Fiber Laser With a Chirped Fiber Grating Stop-Band Filter
    We report a wavelength-switchable single-polarization dissipative soliton (DS) mode-locked fiber laser using a chirped fiber Bragg grating (FBG) for spectral filtering. The chirped FBG, when inserted into the ring cavity, provides a stopband from 1045 nm to 1057 nm, which is used for spectral filtering in this all-normal-dispersion mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser. The combination of the chirped FBG and the Yb gain profile help the formation of the DS. The laser delivers wavelength-switchable and polarized (28 dB) DS of 6.1 nJ and 29 ps at 1032 nm, and 4.3 nJ and 24 ps at 1068 nm, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the direct proof that a bandpass filter is not indispensible to achieve stable DS in ps fiber lasers., Zhang, L., Feng, Y., & Gu, X. (2013). Wavelength-switchable dissipative soliton fiber laser with a chirped fiber grating stop-band filter. IEEE Photonics Journal, 5(2), 1500506-1500506. doi:10.1109/JPHOT.2013.2252608
    Wealth effects in a cash-in-advance economy
    Wealth effects in a cash-in-advance economy
    This paper examines the monetary growth implications of combining Stockman's cash-in-advance constraint on consumption and capital goods and an endogenous rate of time preference that is an increasing function of real wealth. The cash-in-advance constraint imposes an investment tax that reduces steady state consumption and capital. However, endogenous time preference wealth effects link the real and monetary sectors to yield a Mundell-Tobin effect. Cash-in-advance constraint effects dominate endogenous time preference wealth effects so that monetary growth reduces steady state capital and consumption., Also available for download here: http://ideas.repec.org/a/ebl/ecbull/v5y2003i2p1-7.html
    Web-Enabled Spatial Decision Analysis Using Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA)
    Web-Enabled Spatial Decision Analysis Using Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA)
    This paper presents a spatial decision support tool that implements the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA) method. OWA is a family of multicriteria evaluation operators characterised by two sets of weights: criterion importance weights and order weights. We propose a highly interactive way of choosing, modifying, and fine-tuning the decision strategy defined by the order weights. This exploratory approach to OWA is supported by a graphical representation of the operator’s behaviour in terms of decision risk and tradeoff/dispersion between criteria. Our prototype implementation is based on the CommonGIS software, and thus, Webenabled and working with vector data. We successfully demonstrate online, exploratory support of spatial decision strategies using a data set of skiing resorts in Wallis, Switzerland.
    Web-based Spatial Decision Support: Status and Research Directions
    Web-based Spatial Decision Support: Status and Research Directions
    This paper summarizes research on Web-based spatial decision support systems (WebSDSS). The review distinguishes early server-side from more recent client-side applications. A third category of WebSDSS focusing on spatial decision support in public participation is typically implemented as a mixed client/server-based system. Conclusions drawn from previous work include the need for systematic user studies of WebSDSS, and the adoption of interoperable architectures for distributed spatial decision support. Furthermore, a conceptual framework is proposed to facilitate further studies of WebSDSS methods.
    Welfare effects of preferential trade agreements under optimal tariffs
    Welfare effects of preferential trade agreements under optimal tariffs
    In a three country model with endogenous tariffs, this paper evaluates and contrasts the welfare effects of free trade agreements (FTAs) and customs unions (CUs) — the two most commonly occurring preferential trade agreements (PTAs). We show that if the external tariff of a PTA is not too high, it benefits both members and non-members. We also highlight the implications of a key (but commonly ignored) distinction between the two types of PTAs: while an FTA member can form an another (independent) FTA with an existing non-member, a CU member cannot. Under a pair of independent bilateral FTAs, the common member’s welfare is higher than that under free trade. Furthermore, if the common member is relatively efficient compared to the other two countries, such a ‘hub and spoke’ pattern of FTAs can yield higher global welfare than free trade. By contrast, such an outcome is never possible under a CU., Also available for download here: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/17562/
    What If There Is No Killer Application? An Exploration of a User-Centric Perspective on Broadband
    What If There Is No Killer Application? An Exploration of a User-Centric Perspective on Broadband
    This paper explores user and provider experiences with broadband networks. Drawing on data from an early broadband trial and from recent studies of consumer broadband usage, the validity of the commonly held view that widespread adoption of broadband is dependent upon the development of a killer application is challenged. It is argued that access to broadband can be valuable for users without the provision of a killer application and that the dynamics of broadband development are shifting. As more users become content creators and distributors and as it becomes easier for consumers to establish broadband networks without help from traditional providers, the existing relationships within the broadband industry will change. Broadband researchers and stakeholders in the development of broadband networks are encouraged to explore and understand the implications of these changes, recognizing that there is much to be learned about deploying broadband in ways that will create the broad societal benefits promised by its promoters., Preprint of an article later published as: Middleton, C. A. (2003). What If There Is No Killer Application? An Exploration of a User-Centric Perspective on Broadband. Journal of Information Technology, 18(4), 231-246. Publisher URL: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0268%2d3962&volume=18&issue=4&spage=231
    What Makes Journalism “Excellent”? Criteria Identified by Judges in Two Leading Awards Programs
    What Makes Journalism “Excellent”? Criteria Identified by Judges in Two Leading Awards Programs
    What does “excellence” mean in journalism? The literature reveals no universally agreed set of standards, and awards guidelines are often unclear. We interviewed judges in two leading Canadian print journalism awards programs, using a sequence of open-ended and ranking questions to probe their criteria of excellence in a way calculated to elicit not just the standards they felt should be applied but the standards they actually did apply. Judges mentioned a wide variety of criteria, including the social importance and impact of works of journalism. But only two values were affirmed consistently: writing style and reporting rigour., Shapiro, I., Albanese, P., & Doyle, L. (2006). What Makes Journalism “Excellent”? Criteria Identified by Judges in Two Leading Awards Program, Canadian Journal of Communication, 31(2), 425-445. Retrieved from http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/article/view/1743
    What are essential elements of valid research:  The problem of 'data' and their collection in cross-cultural contexts
    What are essential elements of valid research: The problem of 'data' and their collection in cross-cultural contexts
    Online version of an article originally published as: Bernhard, J. K. (2010). What are essential elements of valid research: The problem of 'data' and their collection in cross-cultural contexts. Perspectives: A Journal of Family Resource Programs, Canada. 3, 27-32.
    What can be learned from patient stories about living with the chronicity of heart illness? A Narrative Inquiry
    What can be learned from patient stories about living with the chronicity of heart illness? A Narrative Inquiry
    Background: Patients’ illness stories are valuable information that supports person-centred care across the illness trajectory. Aims: To learn how older South Asian immigrant women experience living with heart illness long after discharge from hospital. Method: We used narrative inquiry, a personal experience method that explores and interprets lived and told stories through the three dimensions of experience. Design: Four participants, over the age of sixty, living with heart illness for over ten years, were invited to engage in narrative interview and Narrative Reflective Process. Outcomes: Giving patients voice, allows caregivers insight into the human experience of illness beyond hospitalization. Considering the increased migration of people around the globe, this knowledge is significant in provision of person-centred care. Implications: Person-centred care does not end with the hospitalization and outpatient clinics. Inter-disciplinary teams need to reconsider the trajectory of chronic illnesses and the care required throughout, especially for marginalized populations., Schwind, J. K., Fredericks, S., Metersky, K., & Porzuczek, V. G. (2016). What can be learned from patient stories about living with the chronicity of heart illness? A narrative inquiry. Contemporary Nurse, 52(2-3), 216-229. doi:10.1080/10376178.2015.1089179
    What is my Child Learning at Elementary School? Culturally Contested Issues Between Teachers and Latin American Families
    What is my Child Learning at Elementary School? Culturally Contested Issues Between Teachers and Latin American Families
    Online version of an article originally published as: Bernhard, J. K., & Freire, M. (1999). What is my child learning at school? Culturally contested issuses of Latin American children and families. Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal, 31(3):72-94.