Research

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  • TiO2 Nanofibrous Interface Development For Raman Detection of Environmental Pollutants
    TiO2 Nanofibrous Interface Development For Raman Detection of Environmental Pollutants
    Sensor development has been reliant on planar Au and Ag nanoparticle research. The current findings explored a unique 3-D network of crystalline TiO2nanoparticles linked as nanofibers. In addition to the favorability of using TiO2 for chemical and bio-molecular sensing, the nanofiber network provides molecular diffusion control and an increased confocal volume signal. Controlled femtosecond laser synthesis is also demonstrated that directly impacts surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy detection of two common environmentally harmful chemicals: bisphenol A and diclofenac sodium salt. These findings assert that 3-D nanofibrous network porosity optimization is crucial for Raman monitoring of drinking water.
    Time-varying window length for correlation forecasts
    Time-varying window length for correlation forecasts
    Forecasting correlations between stocks and commodities is important for diversification across asset classes and other risk management decisions. Correlation forecasts are affected by model uncertainty, the sources of which can include uncertainty about changing fundamentals and associated parameters (model instability), structural breaks and nonlinearities due, for example, to regime switching. We use approaches that weight historical data according to their predictive content. Specifically, we estimate two alternative models, ‘time-varying weights’ and ‘time-varying window’, in order to maximize the value of past data for forecasting. Our empirical analyses reveal that these approaches provide superior forecasts to several benchmark models for forecasting correlations. Keywords: model uncertainty; variance and correlation forecasts; time-varying window length, Jeon, Y., & McCurdy, T. (2017). Time-Varying Window Length for Correlation Forecasts. Econometrics, 5(4), 54., (This article belongs to the Special Issue Volatility Modeling)
    Timing for delivering individualized patient education intervention to coronary artery bypass graft patients: an RCT
    Timing for delivering individualized patient education intervention to coronary artery bypass graft patients: an RCT
    Background: The primary focus of this study is on the timing of the delivery of education to patients who had CABG surgery. Aim: To determine the efficacy of an individualized telephone patient education intervention, delivered at two different points in time (1–2 days pre-discharge versus 1–2 days post-discharge) in enhancing the CABG patient's knowledge of self-care behaviours, performance of self-care behaviours, and symptom frequency. Method: A randomized clinical trial that included a convenience sample of first time CABG patients. Individuals who received education pre-discharge were compared to individuals who received education post-discharge on the outcomes. Results: Results indicated no statistically significant difference in outcomes between the two time points. As well, anxiety levels were found to be significantly higher in the pre-discharge group than the post-discharge group. Conclusions: The individualized nature of the educational intervention may have accounted for non-significant findings reported in outcomes between the two time points. Practice implications: Nurses may consider assessing anxiety levels prior to delivery of educational interventions, implement interventions aimed at reducing anxiety levels, and provide individualized teaching., Fredericks, S. (2009). Timing for delivering individualized patient education intervention to coronary artery bypass graft patients: An RCT. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 8(2), 144-150.
    Timing of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis administration: Complexities of analysis
    Timing of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis administration: Complexities of analysis
    Background The timing of prophylactic antibiotic administration is a patient safety outcome that is recurrently tracked and reported. The interpretation of these data has important implications for patient safety practices. However, diverse data collection methods and approaches to analysis impede knowledge building in this field. This paper makes explicit several challenges to quantifying the timing of prophylactic antibiotics that we encountered during a recent study and offers a suggested protocol for resolving these challenges.Challenges Two clear challenges manifested during the data extraction process: the actual classification of antibiotic timing, and the additional complication of multiple antibiotic regimens with different timing classifications in a single case. A formalized protocol was developed for dealing with incomplete, ambiguous and unclear documentation. A hierarchical coding system was implemented for managing cases with multiple antibiotic regimens.Interpretation Researchers who are tracking prophylactic antibiotic timing as an outcome measure should be aware that documentation of antibiotic timing in the patient chart is frequently incomplete and unclear, and these inconsistencies should be accounted for in analyses. We have developed a systematic method for dealing with specific problematic patterns encountered in the data. We propose that the general adoption of a systematic approach to analysis of this type of data will allow for cross-study comparisons and ensure that interpretation of results is on the basis of timing practices rather than documentation practices., BMC Medical Research Methodology 2009, 9:43. doi:10.1186/1471-2288-9-43
    Tonality of Low-Frequency Synthesized Piano Tones
    Tonality of Low-Frequency Synthesized Piano Tones
    The influences of inharmonicity and bandwidth on sensitivity to tonality in the low- frequency range (A0 to G#1 ) were tested in a listening experiment. Participants were presented a key-defining context (do-mi-do-so) and were asked to rate the goodness of fit of probe tones to the context. Probe tones were the 12 tones of the chromatic scale beginning on do. The set of 12 ratings, called the probe-tone profile, was compared to an established standardized pro- file for the Western tonal hierarchy. Prior research employing this method with real (sampled) piano tones has suggested that sensitivity to tonality is influenced by inharmonicity, partic- ularly in the lowest octaves of the piano where inharmonicity levels are substantially above the detection threshold. In the present experiment, sensitivity to tonality was tested using syn- thesized piano-like tones that were either harmonic or inharmonic. Participants were tested in either a broadband (no filtering) or low-pass (low-pass filtered at 1 KHz) condition. Sensitiv- ity to tonality was highest in the broadband harmonic condition followed by the broadband inharmonic condition. No sensitivity to tonality was found for the low-pass conditions; rather, for both harmonic and inharmonic tones, participants rated probe tones as increasingly good fit as pitch distance from do decreased.
    Tools for educators: strategies and ideas for facilitating online group work using project management principles.
    Tools for educators: strategies and ideas for facilitating online group work using project management principles.
    Group work can be used as an effective tool to help students learn from each other, build community and engage with the course content. The key to the success of a group is in the planning and understanding of the purpose of the work needed. The Technology Enhanced Collaborative Group Work (TECGW) indicated through their research on group work that the way in which instructors facilitate a group project has a major impact on the success of the group. Many educators incorporate group work in their courses, but they may not provide the necessary support to students working in these groups; consequently, students get discouraged, and may decline working in groups. In the online learning environments, with the elimination of physical presence, it is necessary to bring students simultaneously to collaborate on various activates of the course to enhance their engagement with each other, the content and the instructor. As technology plays a vital role in online environments, instructors need to develop strategies for students could help them in planning, collaborating and communicating, synchronously and asynchronously, effectively within a group. Project management concepts could effectively be utilized to help in facilitating students' group work. This paper, introduces effective strategies that will help instructors in facilitating group work by providing tools that students could utilize to understand and define their roles in the group. Additionally, the paper will introduce practices in creating group work assignments, supporting students in groups and enhancing communication among students in online environments. The paper provides some practices in using Web 2.0 tools that could facilitate the production of group work, and how these tools could facilitate learning among students working together on face-to-face and online courses. Keywords: Group Work, Project Management, Collaboration, Online Learning, Technology, Virtual Teams, Instructional Design, Web 2.0, Wikis, Google Drive, Blogs, Assessment, Rubrics., Hanna, D. (2013). Tools for Educators: Strategies and Ideas for Facilitating Online Group Work Using Project Management Principles. Proceedings from: The 5th International Conference on education and new Learning Technologies (EDULEARN13). Barcelona, Spain: IATED.
    Toronto's Little India: A Brief Neighbourhood History
    Toronto's Little India: A Brief Neighbourhood History
    This report explores the history of the area known as Toronto’s Little India. In particular, it investigates the contexts of urbanization, residential change, and business and work related to Little India from early settlement to the contemporary period. The aim is to understand the identity of the neighbourhood and provide a resource to the community.
    Toronto-Area Ethnic Newspapers and Canada's 2011 Federal Election: An Investigation of Content, Focus and Partisanship
    Toronto-Area Ethnic Newspapers and Canada's 2011 Federal Election: An Investigation of Content, Focus and Partisanship
    Canada's political class is embracing ethnocultural news media with increasing zeal, highlighting the need to understand the role of these news organizations in the political process. This study investigated coverage of Canada's 2011 federal election in five Toronto-area ethnocultural newspapers. The publications, which carried campaign news to varying degrees, provided coverage that was distinct in many ways from mainstream media. Content such as the focus on ingroup candidates had the potential to strengthen community bonds while more general election news equipped readers with information that would facilitate participation in society through informed voting. Analysis of reporting about the Conservative Party of Canada, which pursued an aggressive ethnic media strategy, identified no clear pattern of stories with explicitly biased content. In most newspapers, however, the CPC did enjoy an advantage in that it received more coverage than the competition., Lindgren, A. (2014). Toronto-area ethnic newspapers and canada's 2011 federal election: An investigation of content, focus and partisanship. Canadian Journal of Political Science, 47(4), 667. doi:10.1017/S0008423914000912
    Toronto’s Little India in Residential Context: A Geographical Analysis of Census Data
    Toronto’s Little India in Residential Context: A Geographical Analysis of Census Data
    Ethnic economies are an important part of the today’s global city. We examine Toronto’s Little India and map the corresponding ethnic and Visible Minority population and their residential locations across the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area (CMA). Although past research suggests that ethnic economies are typically accompanied by a local co-ethnic residential population, our study shows that this is not the case for Little India. While the South Asian population around Little India is increasing, it is growing at a slower pace than in some other parts of the Toronto CMA. We identify and examine four major South Asian residential clusters across the Toronto CMA that represent a potential customer base for the businesses of Little India.
    Toronto’s Urban Heat Island - Exploring the Relationship between Land Use and Surface Temperature
    Toronto’s Urban Heat Island - Exploring the Relationship between Land Use and Surface Temperature
    The urban heat island effect is linked to the built environment and threatens human health during extreme heat events. In this study, we analyzed whether characteristic land uses within an urban area are associated with higher or lower surface temperatures, and whether concentrations of "hot" land uses exacerbate this relationship. Zonal statistics on a thermal remote sensing image for the City of Toronto revealed statistically significant differences between high average temperatures for commercial and resource/industrial land use (29.1 °C), and low average temperatures for parks and recreational land (25.1 °C) and water bodies (23.1 °C). Furthermore, higher concentrations of either of these land uses were associated with more extreme surface temperatures. We also present selected neighborhoods to illustrate these results. The paper concludes by recommending that municipal planners and decision-makers formulate policies and regulations that are specific to the problematic land uses, in order to mitigate extreme heat.
    Toward 2020 : new directions in journalism education.
    Toward 2020 : new directions in journalism education.
    With one exception (the keynote address by Robert Picard), all of the essays in this volume are expanded versions of presentations made at the conference “Toward 2020: New Directions in Journalism Education,” held at Ryerson University in Toronto on 31 May 2014. Testifying to the urgent interest in professional renewal among journalism educators, more than one hundred people from Canada, the United States, Europe, and Australia attended the conference. The papers published here represent a reasonable cross-section of the issues discussed. The authors advance different ideas about where journalism education should go from here; at times they disagree with one another, but all share the underlying view that if business as usual was ever a viable option, this clearly is no longer the case., Allen, G., Craft, S., Waddell, C., Young, M. L., & Ryerson Journalism Research Centre. (2015). Toward 2020: New directions in journalism education Ryerson Journalism Research Centre.
    Toward Press Council 2.0: An international review of models of, and alternatives to, the traditional press council
    Toward Press Council 2.0: An international review of models of, and alternatives to, the traditional press council
    This paper presents an overview of preliminary results from a comparative study of existing press council models in Canadian provinces and similar democracies abroad. Gathering information by a combination of survey and qualitative-interview methodologies, we are analyzing the relative effectiveness of, and difficulties faced by, varying models of councils. Among the issues to be analyzed are: how existing models of Canadian press councils compare with one another, and with models operating in other democracies; how various stakeholders define the purpose(s) of press councils; the difficulties faced by existing and defunct provincial news councils in achieving their various goals; whether a national press council may be viable and, if so, what the key function(s) of a national press council might be., Shapiro, Ivor and Lisa Taylor. 2012. Toward Press Council 2.0: An international review of models of, and alternatives to, the traditional press council. Proceedings of the 2012 annual conference of the Canadian Communication Association. Availablevia: <http://cca.kingsjournalism.com/?p=175>.