Research

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  • Women, smartphones and the workplace: pragmatic realities and performative identities
    Women, smartphones and the workplace: pragmatic realities and performative identities
    This paper explores the ways that a sample of professional women use smartphones to manage their personal activities and work responsibilities. It reveals a number of specific, mindful practices used to convey and enable accessibility, professionalism and responsiveness to colleagues and clients, showing how smartphones are used to shape and maintain professional identities. At the same time, women also choose to set boundaries to ensure that the immediacy enabled by their smartphones does not encroach upon their personal relationships in undesirable or unpredictable ways, and to allow them to choose when to engage with work while outside the office. The paper reveals the nuances of smartphone use in this group of women, demonstrating various approaches to managing a potentially disruptive communications device to professional and personal advantage, Crowe, R., & Middleton, C. (2012). WOMEN, SMARTPHONES AND THE WORKPLACE: Pragmatic realities and performative identities. Feminist Media Studies, 12(4), 560-569. doi:10.1080/14680777.2012.741872
    Working with Ebook Metadata
    Working with Ebook Metadata
    Presented at British Columbia Library Association annual conference, April 23, 2010, Penticton, BC.
    “Feels like you’ve hit the lottery”: Assessing the implementation of a discovery layer tool at Ryerson University
    “Feels like you’ve hit the lottery”: Assessing the implementation of a discovery layer tool at Ryerson University
    The research study was initiated to evaluate and assess the web-scale discovery (WSD) service Summon to coincide with its launch at Ryerson University Library in September 2011. The project utilized a mixed methods sequential explanatory strategy and applied an inductive analysis. Quantitative data was gathered with two online questionnaires, followed by a series of focus groups with students for the qualitative phase. The quantitative phase of the study collected over 6,200 survey responses (21% of the university population), with over 420 students indicating interest in participating in a qualitative follow-up (6.7% of the respondents). The survey data showed that most undergraduate students rated Summon highly in ease of use; however, there was a lower satisfaction with the large quantity of, and relevance of search results. Additionally, participants indicated that they used Summon in conjunction with other research tools, such as Google Scholar. In the qualitative phase, small focus groups, consisted of a total of 13 participants, allowed the students to express their experiences with Summon in depth. The study has given insight into the role of Summon in terms of undergraduate information-seeking behaviour. Participant feedback revealed potential improvements for Summon at Ryerson and will be useful to other institutions either using or considering the use of similar products. Overall, the results from the study will help to inform Ryerson Library practice surrounding future directions in reference, instruction, and service promotion.
    “No Apple iPhone? You must be Canadian”:  mobile technologies, participatory culture, and rhetorical transformation
    “No Apple iPhone? You must be Canadian”: mobile technologies, participatory culture, and rhetorical transformation
    Abstract: Participation with new mobile devices drives new social practices. This article engages in a close analysis of a so-called participatory culture surrounding iPods and iPhones. It offers close rhetorical readings of object phenomena including advertisements, Canadian news stories, and consumer reactions in electronic media. More specifically, this article reveals a rhetorical transformation between the iPod Silhouettes advertising campaign and the iPhone release campaign, causing a shift in subjectivity; iPod subjects are afforded a degree of freedom and play, while iPhone subjects are bound to regimes of work. It is also argued that news stories that emerged in the summer of 2007, when the iPhone was not released in Canada, structure a rhetoric of the “excluded Canadian.” Keywords: Mobile communication; Rhetoric; Visual communication, Pedersen, I. (2008). “No Apple iPhone? You Must Be Canadian”:. Canadian Journal of Communication, 33, 491-510.
    “The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years
    “The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years
    Objectivism, the libertarian philosophy established by Ayn Rand during the postwar years, has attracted a great deal of attention from philosophers, political scientists, economists, and English professors alike in recent years, but it hasn’t received much notice from historians with an interest in education. This article will address that problem by discussing how Rand and her followers established a philosophy of education during the 1960s and 1970s that was based, in part, on vilifying the so-called collectivist ideas of John Dewey and lionizing the so-called individualist ideas of Maria Montessori. Unfortunately, the narrative that emerged during this time seriously misrepresented the ideas of both Dewey and Montessori, resulting in a somewhat distorted view of both educators, Reid, J. (2013, Spring). “The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years. Historical Studies in Education / Revue D'histoire De L'education, 73-94.