Research

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  • Wireless Sensor Network Optimization: Multi-Objective Paradigm
    Wireless Sensor Network Optimization: Multi-Objective Paradigm
    Optimization problems relating to wireless sensor network planning, design, deployment and operation often give rise to multi-objective optimization formulations where multiple desirable objectives compete with each other and the decision maker has to select one of the tradeoff solutions. These multiple objectives may or may not conflict with each other. Keeping in view the nature of the application, the sensing scenario and input/output of the problem, the type of optimization problem changes. To address different nature of optimization problems relating to wireless sensor network design, deployment, operation, planning and placement, there exist a plethora of optimization solution types. We review and analyze different desirable objectives to show whether they conflict with each other, support each other or they are design dependent. We also present a generic multi-objective optimization problem relating to wireless sensor network which consists of input variables, required output, objectives and constraints. A list of constraints is also presented to give an overview of different constraints which are considered while formulating the optimization problems in wireless sensor networks. Keeping in view the multi facet coverage of this article relating to multi-objective optimization, this will open up new avenues of research in the area of multi-objective optimization relating to wireless sensor networks., Iqbal, M., Naeem, M., Anpalagan, A., Ahmed, A., & Azam, M. (2015). Wireless sensor network optimization: Multi-objective paradigm. Sensors, 15(7), 17572-17620. doi:10.3390/s150717572, (This article belongs to the Section Sensor Networks)
    Women in medicine: practice patterns and attitudes
    Women in medicine: practice patterns and attitudes
    Increasing numbers of women are entering medicine in Canada. In 1959 women accounted for 6% of the medical school graduates, but by 1989 they accounted for 44%. Although there has been little systematic investigation of the impact of this increase on Canada's health care system, there are grounds for believing that female physicians bring with them distinctive values and interests, which may be reflected in the way they conduct their professional practices. We used data from a recent national survey of 2398 Canadian physicians to examine differences between women and men in their practices and their attitudes toward health care issues. Significant differences were found in the organization and management of the practices. Women preferred group over solo practice and were overrepresented in community health centres, health service organizations and centres locaux de services communautaires in Quebec. One-third of the women, as compared with half of the men, were in specialties. Even after adjusting for differences in workloads the incomes of the women were significantly lower than those of the men. Only minor differences were observed in the assessment of the health care system and alternative modes of organizing health care services. We believe that the differences were due to the double workload of women as professionals and family caregivers and the powerful socialization effects of medical education. As women overcome their minority status in the medical profession, differences between the sexes may become more apparent. Thus, the extent and effects of the progressive increase in the number of women in Canadian medicine should be assessed on an ongoing basis., CAN MED ASSOC J 1990; 143 (3)
    Women in the Field: What Do You Know?
    Women in the Field: What Do You Know?
    Rauhala, Ann and April Lindgren. 2012. Women in the Field: What do youknow? Proceedings of the 2012 annual conference of the CanadianCommunication Association. Available via: <http://cca.kingsjournalism.com/?p=173>.
    Women, smartphones and the workplace: pragmatic realities and performative identities
    Women, smartphones and the workplace: pragmatic realities and performative identities
    This paper explores the ways that a sample of professional women use smartphones to manage their personal activities and work responsibilities. It reveals a number of specific, mindful practices used to convey and enable accessibility, professionalism and responsiveness to colleagues and clients, showing how smartphones are used to shape and maintain professional identities. At the same time, women also choose to set boundaries to ensure that the immediacy enabled by their smartphones does not encroach upon their personal relationships in undesirable or unpredictable ways, and to allow them to choose when to engage with work while outside the office. The paper reveals the nuances of smartphone use in this group of women, demonstrating various approaches to managing a potentially disruptive communications device to professional and personal advantage, Crowe, R., & Middleton, C. (2012). WOMEN, SMARTPHONES AND THE WORKPLACE: Pragmatic realities and performative identities. Feminist Media Studies, 12(4), 560-569. doi:10.1080/14680777.2012.741872
    Working with Ebook Metadata
    Working with Ebook Metadata
    Presented at British Columbia Library Association annual conference, April 23, 2010, Penticton, BC.
    You're hired:  examining acceptance of social media screening of job applicants
    You're hired: examining acceptance of social media screening of job applicants
    The paper examines attitudes towards employers using social media to screen job applicants. In an online survey of 454 participants, we compare the comfort level with this practice in relation to different types of information that can be gathered from publicly accessible social media. The results revealed a nuanced nature of people’s information privacy expectations in the context of hiring practices. People’s perceptions of employers using social media to screen job applicants depends on (1) whether or not they are currently seeking employment (or plan to), (2) the type of information that is being accessed by a prospective employer (if there are on the job market), and (3) their cultural background, but not gender. The findings emphasize the need for employers and recruiters who are relying on social media to screen job applicants to be aware of the types of information that may be perceived to be more sensitive by applicants, such as social network-related information. Keywords : social media, information privacy, job screening, hiring practices, Gruzd, A., Jacobson, J., Dubois, E. (2017). You're Hired: Examining Acceptance of Social Media Screening of Job Applicants. In Proceedings of the 23rd Americas Conference on Information Systems, August 10-12, 2017, Boston, MA, USA.
    ‘Identi-city’: Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto
    ‘Identi-city’: Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto
    Each year, at the start of the winter semester, undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and staff, and invited guests come together to take part in the annual Collaborative Exercise (CEx) held at the Department of Architectural Science at Ryerson University. The five-day event challenges students to address an important contemporary issue. The intention of the exercise is to engage students to collaborate, think and design, while investigating a topic related to architecture and the built environment. Through this experience, students have the opportunity to work with students from other years in the Department’s program, to achieve a common design goal. The Collaborative Exercise ends with an exhibition at the Paul H. Cocker Gallery in the Ryerson University’s Architecture Building. This book showcases the outcomes of the 2014 Collaborative Exercise, entitled ‘Identi-city’ – Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto., Kapelos, G. T. (Ed.). (2017). ‘Identi-city’: Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto. Toronto, ON, Canada: Department of Architectural Science, Faculty of Engineering & Architectural Science, Ryerson University.
    “Feels like you’ve hit the lottery”: Assessing the implementation of a discovery layer tool at Ryerson University
    “Feels like you’ve hit the lottery”: Assessing the implementation of a discovery layer tool at Ryerson University
    The research study was initiated to evaluate and assess the web-scale discovery (WSD) service Summon to coincide with its launch at Ryerson University Library in September 2011. The project utilized a mixed methods sequential explanatory strategy and applied an inductive analysis. Quantitative data was gathered with two online questionnaires, followed by a series of focus groups with students for the qualitative phase. The quantitative phase of the study collected over 6,200 survey responses (21% of the university population), with over 420 students indicating interest in participating in a qualitative follow-up (6.7% of the respondents). The survey data showed that most undergraduate students rated Summon highly in ease of use; however, there was a lower satisfaction with the large quantity of, and relevance of search results. Additionally, participants indicated that they used Summon in conjunction with other research tools, such as Google Scholar. In the qualitative phase, small focus groups, consisted of a total of 13 participants, allowed the students to express their experiences with Summon in depth. The study has given insight into the role of Summon in terms of undergraduate information-seeking behaviour. Participant feedback revealed potential improvements for Summon at Ryerson and will be useful to other institutions either using or considering the use of similar products. Overall, the results from the study will help to inform Ryerson Library practice surrounding future directions in reference, instruction, and service promotion.
    “No Apple iPhone? You must be Canadian”:  mobile technologies, participatory culture, and rhetorical transformation
    “No Apple iPhone? You must be Canadian”: mobile technologies, participatory culture, and rhetorical transformation
    Abstract: Participation with new mobile devices drives new social practices. This article engages in a close analysis of a so-called participatory culture surrounding iPods and iPhones. It offers close rhetorical readings of object phenomena including advertisements, Canadian news stories, and consumer reactions in electronic media. More specifically, this article reveals a rhetorical transformation between the iPod Silhouettes advertising campaign and the iPhone release campaign, causing a shift in subjectivity; iPod subjects are afforded a degree of freedom and play, while iPhone subjects are bound to regimes of work. It is also argued that news stories that emerged in the summer of 2007, when the iPhone was not released in Canada, structure a rhetoric of the “excluded Canadian.” Keywords: Mobile communication; Rhetoric; Visual communication, Pedersen, I. (2008). “No Apple iPhone? You Must Be Canadian”:. Canadian Journal of Communication, 33, 491-510.
    “The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years
    “The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years
    Objectivism, the libertarian philosophy established by Ayn Rand during the postwar years, has attracted a great deal of attention from philosophers, political scientists, economists, and English professors alike in recent years, but it hasn’t received much notice from historians with an interest in education. This article will address that problem by discussing how Rand and her followers established a philosophy of education during the 1960s and 1970s that was based, in part, on vilifying the so-called collectivist ideas of John Dewey and lionizing the so-called individualist ideas of Maria Montessori. Unfortunately, the narrative that emerged during this time seriously misrepresented the ideas of both Dewey and Montessori, resulting in a somewhat distorted view of both educators, Reid, J. (2013, Spring). “The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years. Historical Studies in Education / Revue D'histoire De L'education, 73-94.