Undergraduate

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  • Closing Canada's digital divide:  a review of policies in Canada and abroad
    Closing Canada's digital divide: a review of policies in Canada and abroad
    This paper explores Canada’s telecommunications policy landscape, with an aim of evaluating its effect on Canada’s digital divide. It looks into decisions made by the CRTC and ISED (and its predecessors), which have influenced the development of broadband infrastructure in Canada. This paper also evaluates the efficacy of digital literacy training programs, aimed at allowing Canadians to leverage connectivity. Finally, it concludes with a discussion about how the Innovation Agenda can be used as a mechanism to narrow Canada’s digital divide.
    Swipe-Technology’s Influence in Born Digital Culture: Redesigning Pedagogy in Early Childhood Education
    Swipe-Technology’s Influence in Born Digital Culture: Redesigning Pedagogy in Early Childhood Education
    This essay examines the ways in which technology defines and divides generations and considers how swipe-­technology (touch-­screen technologies) shape emerging learning styles. Specifically, it focuses on the research currently being investigated on how forms of digital literacy represent a radical shift, away from traditional forms of literacy (Prensky, 2001a, b; Frand, 2000; Prensky, 2001b; Tapscott, 1997; Franco, 2013; Plowman & McPake, 2013; Infante, 2014; Passey, 2014) and evaluates various claims made about the social consequences of such change. This paper emphasizes the impact that swipe-­technology has on young children during early stages of their development and seeks to answer the following question: what are the consequences of digital language becoming the Born Digital’s (Franco, 2013) primary form of expression? The paper draws on some traditional theories such as those of Mannheim (Kecskemeti, 1952) and Vygotsky (1929, 1962, 1978) to provide a broader contextualization. In so doing, it hopes to contribute to the dialogue about how educational institutions should be redesigned to accommodate new media technologies.