Theses

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  • What is the Food Network feeding us? : questioning the Food Network's representation of the food industry
    What is the Food Network feeding us? : questioning the Food Network's representation of the food industry
    Today, the television Food Network is one of the most popular sources of food knowledge. Although it may be perceived simplistically as a recipe resource for aspiring home chefs it represents much more. Through analyses of the Food Network programming this work examines the network's representations of our food ways. More specifically, portrayals of the food industry are explored. It is argued that the network is steeped in nostalgic longing for a traditional value system which emphasizes family and home. This focus on family, community and small scale food preparation eliminates problematic aspects of our food production, distribution and consumption systems.
    What is there to Yelp about?
    What is there to Yelp about?
    This paper examines the use of language in user generated online product reviews on the website Yelp.ca. Using both Relevance Theory and the Co-operative Principle this study identifies nine linguistic devices to analyze within restaurant reviews on this website. Yelp.ca administrators identify some reviewers as “Elite Reviewers.” This study contrasted twenty-five Elite reviews with twenty-five Non-Elite reviews in order to determine which linguistic devices were more prevalent within Elite reviews. The findings illustrate that there are concrete differences between these two types of reviews. Assuming that Elite Reviews are in fact more persuasive, these findings suggest that there may be concrete attributes of a review that make it more persuasive in an online, user generated context.
    What to expect? : examining the role of pre-departure cultural orientations
    What to expect? : examining the role of pre-departure cultural orientations
    Providing relevant pre-migration information for newcomers to Canada can have many potential benefits, however there is a gap in understanding the implications of pre-departure cultural orientations (P-DCO) on refugee settlement. This research focuses on the unique resettlement experiences of privately sponsored refugees entering Canada through the Student Refugee Program (SRP). The purpose of this research is to understand how P-DCO impacts the resettlement of SRP participants and identify the effectiveness of such programs. The study uses the theoretical lens of cultural and social capital to understand the role of P-DCO in the migration and resettlement of SRP participants. Individual interviews were conducted with 6 SRP participants, as well as a key informant interview with the SRP Senior Program Officer. This exploratory study contributes to an enhanced understanding of the effectiveness of P-DCO for refugees in their resettlement and advocates further research for other immigrant categories.
    What's Steering Consumer Preferences For Autonomous Vehicles In The Greater Toronto And Hamilton Area?
    What's Steering Consumer Preferences For Autonomous Vehicles In The Greater Toronto And Hamilton Area?
    Automated vehicles (AVs) have the potential to change the way we travel within our cities. However, the conditions under which consumers will adopt AVs are poorly understood. An internet-based survey was conducted in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area to understand how consumers will respond to automated vehicles. This study estimates the effect of demographic characteristics, travel characteristics, and built-environment variables on respondent’s willingness to pay for private autonomous vehicles and frequency of use for shared autonomous vehicles under different pricing levels. The results indicate that having a higher household income and owning a more expensive vehicle are good predictors of interest in PAVs, whereas individuals who experienced more car accidents as a passenger and individuals who commute using public transit or walk/cycle are more interested in SAVs. Regional rail users, Uber users, and younger respondents were interested in both ownership models. This provides insight to help policymakers advance transportation policies and collective social goals.
    What's Up With All these Walls?" : Racialized Lesbian/Queer Women Immigrants and Belonging in Toronto
    What's Up With All these Walls?" : Racialized Lesbian/Queer Women Immigrants and Belonging in Toronto
    Despite government and scholarly interest in how Canada's immigrants settle after arrival, there is limited scholarship on how queer female immigrants find spaces for belonging in a Toronto context in both immigration scholarship, and in theories of queer migration. Drawing on critical queer, critical post-colonial feminist, and critical whiteness approaches, the paper aims to demonstrate why a universal subject, and increasingly, a universal queer subject renders a racialized lesbian/queer woman immigrant living in Toronto marginalized, impossible and unintelligible in mainstream and queer spaces. For the study, three racialized lesbian/queer women immigrants living in Toronto were interviewed. A reflexive analysis of the experiences of the three participants suggests that spaces of belonging for a racialized lesbian/queer woman immigrant in Toronto and beyond are limited, contradictory, and conditional.
    What's Up? Creating The Next Generation Of Engaged Urban Citizens: Examining The High School Geography Curriculum In Ontario For Education On Urban Planning Issues
    What's Up? Creating The Next Generation Of Engaged Urban Citizens: Examining The High School Geography Curriculum In Ontario For Education On Urban Planning Issues
    The consequences of planning issues like suburban sprawl are well-known in academia and the planning profession, however there is a disconnect between this knowledge and the actions of decision-makers, as well as, the populations who elect them. It is argued that if students in Ontario were better informed or knowledgeable about urban planning issues within the high school curricula, then there could be a stronger framework for which to improve upon planning urban regions according to best practices and principles. A focus is placed on geography education and the provincial geography curriculum due to it having the strongest potential for inclusion of this topic. Through a literature review and semi-structured interviews with educators and planners, this paper examines the current geography curriculum, best practices, as well as the barriers to incorporating urban planning issues into high school geography classrooms. Lastly, recommendations are provided for stakeholders in the planning and geography education professions on how to overcome these barriers.
    What's love got to do with it?: an analysis of the narrative portrayals and ideologies of romantic love in the neo-traditional romantic comedy.
    What's love got to do with it?: an analysis of the narrative portrayals and ideologies of romantic love in the neo-traditional romantic comedy.
    "Romantic love has been, and continues to be, the subject of diverse discussions in a variety of realms, including but not limited to, philosophy, psychology and anthropology. Despite the depth and range of such discussions, as a concept, romantic love remains an enigmatic phenomenon. Love may be knowable and comprehensible to others, as understood in the phrases, "I am in love", "I love you", but it is often felt, most notably by the humanities academic community, that what "love" means in these sentences cannot be analyzed further. This is because the concept of "love" is perceived to be irreducible; an axiomatic, or self-evident, state of affairs that warrants no further intellectual intrusion. In attempting to define love therefore, we stumble across the philosophical questions of how we may know love, how we may understand it and whether it is possible or plausible to make statements about being in love if love is purely an emotional condition. In light of these concerns it is necessary to assert that there is a difference between the claim that love cannot be examined and the claim that it should not be subject to examination out of a sense of reverence for its mysteriousness, its awesome, divine, or romantic nature.
    What’s News Got to Do with It?: Examining the Contribution of Toronto’s Press in Maintaining an Environmentally-Detrimental Social Paradigm, 2003-2006
    What’s News Got to Do with It?: Examining the Contribution of Toronto’s Press in Maintaining an Environmentally-Detrimental Social Paradigm, 2003-2006
    This content analysis examines print media coverage of Toronto's waterfront development to determine whether story frames perpetuate the dominant social paradigm. Articles from 8 newspapers are analysed in two content dimensions, the sub-issues which surround waterfront development and the ways of understanding the environment presented as relevant to Toronto's waterfront development. Findings show presence of conflict, use of a non-routine information channel and broad source mix do not result in more diverse content. Likewise, characteristics such as a news organization's conventionality (i.e., alternative or mainstream), size and ownership (i.e., independent or group-owned) exert limited influence over story content. Organized around the competitive city concept described by Kipfer and Keil's (2002), this research examines whether media coverage aligns with the capitalist urbanization process, concluding story frames in news discourse de-emphasize the environment as an issue and rely on the least-progressive environment paradigms when reporting on Toronto's waterfront development.
    What’s in an @reply? A case study of two-way communication in Target Canada’s Twitter @replies
    What’s in an @reply? A case study of two-way communication in Target Canada’s Twitter @replies
    This paper analyzes the Twitter @replies (responses to a user’s initial tweet) of Target Canada as the organization entered the Canadian retail landscape in the Spring of 2013. The @replies posted by Target Canada are analyzed through two lenses: Grunig’s (1992) two-way symmetrical model of public relations and Kent & Taylor’s (2001) dialogic theory of public relations. Grunig’s model argues that the symmetrical model of communication serves the interests of both organizations and their publics by emphasizing dialogue and mutually beneficial relationships (Grunig & Jaatinen, 1999). Similarly, Kent & Taylor advocate for relational interaction and relationship building between organizations and their audience. This case study will contribute to the small body of literature that focuses on Twitter’s @reply function. As social media use is an increasingly important marketing and branding tool, it is important for organizations to realize the potential that each platform can offer. Through Twitter @replies, organizations can create a balanced dialogue (where both the organization and its public participate in a dialogic exchange) and build open, mutually beneficial relationships.
    When being imperfect Just won’t do: exploring the relationship between perfectionism and suicidality
    When being imperfect Just won’t do: exploring the relationship between perfectionism and suicidality
    The current study aimed to increase understanding of the relationship between perfectionism and various forms of suicidality, as well as explore potential pathways that account for the relationship. 130 university students completed measures of perfectionism, shame, difficulties with emotion regulation, self-compassion, depression severity, and hopelessness, as well explicit and implicit measures of suicidality. Results indicated that adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism were not uniquely associated with implicit and explicit suicidality. However, when not controlling for depression severity and hopelessness, higher levels of maladaptive perfectionism were associated with heightened explicit suicidality. Furthermore, results indicated that shame significantly mediated the relationship between maladaptive perfectionism and explicit suicidality. Implications for understanding the link between perfectionism and suicidality are discussed, as are potential clinical implications for reducing suicidality amongst perfectionistic individuals.
    When do people lie, for whom, and why? : altruistic lying in an alibi corroboration context.
    When do people lie, for whom, and why? : altruistic lying in an alibi corroboration context.
    Three studies were conducted in order to identity factors that impact the likelihood that a witness will lie for a suspect in an alibi corroboration context. Specifically, the level of affinity between a suspect and a witness, the level of social pressure, and gender were investigated as factors impacting the likelihood that a witness would knowingly support a false alibi. During a study session purportedly intended to investigate dyadic problem-solving ability, a mock theft was staged in an adjacent office. When questioned by the experimenter, undergraduate students were provided the opportunity to either corroborate or refute a confederate’s false alibi that the latter had been in the testing room during the time of the theft, which participants knew was false. In study 1, participants who were explicitly asked to conceal the confederate’s whereabouts during the time of the theft were more likely to lie for him or her by corroborating the false alibi (61% vs. 26% of those who were not asked to lie). In study 2, there was a higher percentage of male participants who corroborated a male confederate’s false alibi (41%) compared to female participants who corroborated a female confederate’s false alibi (23%). In study 3, participants were found to be more likely to lie for a confederate when the latter was their friend (41%) than when he or she was a stranger (18%). How much a participant liked the suspect (study 1) and whether or not the suspect had previously helped the participant (study 2) did not affect the rates of false alibi corroboration. The results confirm that alibi witnesses often lie, but suggest that investigators and jurors may underestimate the frequency with which strangers and acquaintances lie for one another, and that witnesses who lie do so more often because they trust that the suspect is innocent rather than guilty.