Theses

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  • When do people lie, for whom, and why? : altruistic lying in an alibi corroboration context.
    When do people lie, for whom, and why? : altruistic lying in an alibi corroboration context.
    Three studies were conducted in order to identity factors that impact the likelihood that a witness will lie for a suspect in an alibi corroboration context. Specifically, the level of affinity between a suspect and a witness, the level of social pressure, and gender were investigated as factors impacting the likelihood that a witness would knowingly support a false alibi. During a study session purportedly intended to investigate dyadic problem-solving ability, a mock theft was staged in an adjacent office. When questioned by the experimenter, undergraduate students were provided the opportunity to either corroborate or refute a confederate’s false alibi that the latter had been in the testing room during the time of the theft, which participants knew was false. In study 1, participants who were explicitly asked to conceal the confederate’s whereabouts during the time of the theft were more likely to lie for him or her by corroborating the false alibi (61% vs. 26% of those who were not asked to lie). In study 2, there was a higher percentage of male participants who corroborated a male confederate’s false alibi (41%) compared to female participants who corroborated a female confederate’s false alibi (23%). In study 3, participants were found to be more likely to lie for a confederate when the latter was their friend (41%) than when he or she was a stranger (18%). How much a participant liked the suspect (study 1) and whether or not the suspect had previously helped the participant (study 2) did not affect the rates of false alibi corroboration. The results confirm that alibi witnesses often lie, but suggest that investigators and jurors may underestimate the frequency with which strangers and acquaintances lie for one another, and that witnesses who lie do so more often because they trust that the suspect is innocent rather than guilty.
    When remittances become their tears : Canada's exclusionary immigration policy towards African immigrants robs Sudanese immigrants of the very money they need for settlement
    When remittances become their tears : Canada's exclusionary immigration policy towards African immigrants robs Sudanese immigrants of the very money they need for settlement
    This study examines the difficulties associated with family sponsorship from Africa to Canada and the misleading picture in the literature that remittances represent generous flows of money from developed to the developing countries. It also examines how Canada's immigration policy, due to its cultural bias, results in African immigrants being coerced to send remittances. Its findings indicate that while remittances are sent for various reasons, Canada's culturally exclusionary immigration policy inflects negative impact on African immigrants seeking family reunification. The study examined the experiences of Sudanese immigrants in Canada. Its findings indicate that they handle racism, cultural exclusion and delays in family reunification which deteriorate their socioeconomic status. To reverse these experiences, immigration policy needs to address sponsorship inefficiencies and embrace cultural sensitive. [sic] This qualitative study interviewed 12 key informants at various stages of the sponsorship process. This was supplemented with a literature review and secondary data analysis.
    Where are the children?  Deconstructing the Ontario Autism Program
    Where are the children? Deconstructing the Ontario Autism Program
    The Ontario Autism Program (OAP) provides behavioural supports and services to autistic children and youth, and their families. This study applied a critical discourse analysis (CDA) to examine the OAP policy documents using a children’s rights framework. The purpose of the study was to examine how autistic children’s rights are respected in the OAP policy documents. A CDA of the documents led to three key findings: the difference in roles of different social groups, quantifying and classifying autistic children, and the one size fits all approach in the program. The three themes present in the OAP policy documents are power and dominance, ideologies of childhood, and the medical model. The ways in which children are presented suggests that children’s rights are being neglected. The paper concludes with recommendations for how clinicians can facilitate children’s participation when implementing the program and changes required in the policy documents to incorporate a children’s rights framework. Keywords: autism, children’s rights, development, medical model, policy, power
    Where can Millennials afford to live within the city of Toronto
    Where can Millennials afford to live within the city of Toronto
    This research examines housing affordability as it pertains to millennials living in the City of Toronto. It explores literature, resale market data and planning policies to address the affordability crisis of housing in the City. It begins by a literature overview of the various definitions of affordability and examines the different historical economic methodologies used by different levels of Canadian governments. This discussion is followed by a millennial demographic analysis of the City of Toronto as a whole, and of the 25 City Wards. Housing market trends are also discussed by considering central principles and potential implications for housing affordability. An income analysis to determine affordability within select Wards is also addressed using the residual income ratio method and economic market constraints. The paper concludes by addressing the issues of affordable housing through planning policies and makes recommendations for policies that relate to the issue on all levels of government. Key Words: A paper on housing affordability issues in Toronto, used the key words: Housing, Ownership, Rental, Affordable, Resale, Toronto, Millennial, Income
    Where flesh meets bone:  dance in the modern art museum
    Where flesh meets bone: dance in the modern art museum
    Dance has recently taken up an increasing presence in major modern art museums as core curatorial programming, occupying galleries throughout exhibition hours. Although time figures prominently in emerging literature addressing this trend, spatial analyses remain fragmentary. Yet, dance is distinctive from other time-based media because of its heightened relationship with space. This raises an important question: how does dance’s newfound presence ‘re-choreograph’ the spaces of modern art museums? Extending the work of Henri Lefebvre, this dissertation adopts an expanded definition of museum space encompassing physical, social and conceptual domains. Dance, an art concerned with the shaping of space, is examined as a transformative force, productively intervening with the galleries, encounters, objects, and historical narratives comprising modern art museum space. In this study, purity and atemporality are identified as the preeminent principles organizing modern art museum space, and dance, an ‘impure’ and process-based art, is theorized as a productive contaminant, catalyzing change. Using this theoretical framework and Using this theoretical framework and evocative descriptions of Boris Charmatz’s 20 Dancers for the XX Century (Museum of Modern Art, New York, 18-20 October 2013), dance’s unique collaboration with modern art museum space is analyzed. Socially, dance’s multisensuality pollutes museum goers’ ocularcentric experiences with art. Conceptually, dance diversifies understandings of objects and the androcentric history they uphold. Physically, dance is carving out new spaces, with performance venues being incorporated into the ‘bones’ of high profile institutions. Interspersed between these analytical chapters, evocative descriptions of Spatial Confessions (On the Question of Instituting the Public) by Bojana Cvejić and collaborators (Tate Modern, London, 21-24 May 2014) introduce observations beyond the analytical scope, opening up the liminal spaces of this document to ongoing inquiry. This dissertation contributes a sustained analysis of dance’s spatial impact on modern art museums. By investigating how dance intervenes with the limitations of the white cube, it critiques this supposedly ‘blank’ space, questioning its continued supremacy within these institutions. Moreover, as dance is ushered into performance venues within the museum’s expanding domain, this dissertation interrogates the modern propensity for specialization and master narratives pervading the spaces of these institutions, despite decades of interventional artistic and curatorial practices.
    Where to move? Evaluating the potential of BMO field and Varsity Centre to host the Toronto Argonauts
    Where to move? Evaluating the potential of BMO field and Varsity Centre to host the Toronto Argonauts
    The Toronto Argonauts are the oldest continuously running professional football team in North America and a storied franchise within the Canadian Football League. However, they are also a team facing vagrancy, with their lease at Rogers Centre expiring on December 31, 2017 and have historically had trouble-selling tickets at this locale. The team is now looking to play in a smaller established venue that is more realistic to fill and such stadiums suggested have included BMO Field and Varsity Centre. Therefore, the research within this paper addresses the gap in the planning knowledge of which of these two stadiums should be chosen to move the team to from evaluations that include redevelopment cost, site location, accessibility, and a surrounding land use. The research highlights that Varsity Centre has the greatest potential, while also providing a set of recommendations for either site to optimize the potential to host the team.
    White envy and piggy-backing privilege : exploring adult Korean transracial adoptees' identities in the Canadian context
    White envy and piggy-backing privilege : exploring adult Korean transracial adoptees' identities in the Canadian context
    The purpose of this study is to explore how adult Korean transracial adoptees reflect on their racial and adoptive identities throughout their lifetimes, developing a unique sense of belonging and membership in the Canadian context. The main question under investigation is: If transracial adoptees have been raised among predominately white family and community members, then how do their processes of racial and adoptive identity formation fit into to critical theories of racialization and frameworks of normalized whiteness and colour blindness: Six interviews explore processes in which Korean transracial adoptees develop complex identities to navigate through difference, engaging with ethnic communities and their birth cultures to develop a distinctive membership in society. Research in the field of transracial adoption is crucial for revising policy and practice, engaging with adoptive parents' racial (in)sensitivities, expanding the notion of the traditional family, and pushing social workers and adoption agencies to step outside their comfort zones.
    Whiteness, Orientalism and Immigration: A Critique of Two Iranian Exilic Memoirs
    Whiteness, Orientalism and Immigration: A Critique of Two Iranian Exilic Memoirs
    This paper is a critique of two Iranian exilic memoirs: Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir by Azar Nafisi and Marina Nemat’s Prisoner of Tehran: A Memoir. By reading both texts as “native informant” (Spivak, 2003; Dabashi, 2006) memoirs, this paper analyzes how the authors’ performance of marginality within Iranian society and sameness with their Western readers results in their adoption of a ‘white’ Western feminist gaze at post-revolutionary Iran, which is located within an Orientalist discourse regarding differences between ‘East’ and West’. Nafisi and Nemat contribute to the racialization of Muslims and they racialize a ‘white’ identity that is primarily expressed through the unveiled body and strong support for Western values and democracy. I argue that their representations of Iran are part of a discourse of racialized whiteness that is a feature and governing principle of Western immigration and its attempt to control and ‘liberate’ the Muslim migrant subject.
    Who were the Hackney Flashers?  The history and importance of a British Feminist Collective, 1974-1980
    Who were the Hackney Flashers? The history and importance of a British Feminist Collective, 1974-1980
    The purpose of this project is to provide a resource for museum professionals who are working with materials related to the Hackney Flashers. The Hackney Flashers were a radical socialist-feminist collective that was active in northeast London in the 1970s. The goal is to provide a well-researched history of the collective, as well as address current issues surrounding exhibiting and archiving related materials. This has been done by balancing written sources with oral histories by surviving members of the collective. Imbedded in the Women’s Liberation Movement and the radical-feminist politics of 1970s Britain, the Hackney Flashers used photography to document women in their community in order to expose social inequality. Heavily influenced by the photomontages of John Heartfield, the collective collaged documentary photographs with cartoons, advertisements and text in order to provide a wider context than what documentary photography could provide on its own.
    Who were the Hackney Flashers? The history and importance of a British feminist collective, 1974-1980.
    Who were the Hackney Flashers? The history and importance of a British feminist collective, 1974-1980.
    The purpose of this project is to provide a resource for museum professionals who are working with materials related to the Hackney Flashers. The Hackney Flashers were a radical socialist-feminist collective that was active in northeast London in the 1970s. The goal is to provide a well-researched history of the collective, as well as address current issues surrounding exhibiting and archiving related materials. This has been done by balancing written sources with oral histories by surviving members of the collective. Imbedded in the Women’s Liberation Movement and the radical-feminist politics of 1970s Britain, the Hackney Flashers used photography to document women in their community in order to expose social inequality. Heavily influenced by the photomontages of John Heartfield, the collective collaged documentary photographs with cartoons, advertisements and text in order to provide a wider context than what documentary photography could provide on its own.
    Who's afraid of the big bad wolf : examining attacks on Canada's federal centre-right political parties in the televised negative political advertisements between 1993 and 2006 using propaganda analysis
    Who's afraid of the big bad wolf : examining attacks on Canada's federal centre-right political parties in the televised negative political advertisements between 1993 and 2006 using propaganda analysis
    This thesis uses a triangulated methodology of focus groups, semiotic analysis, and content analysis to categorize and analyze the televised negative political advertisements aired during the Canadian federal elections between 1993 and 2006. How these attacks made against the conservative parties during this timeframe were interpreted by mothers of adolescent children receives particular considerations. The findings demonstrate that during this period the Canadian debate between individualism and communitarianism was prevalent in these political advertisements. It is argued that propaganda methods, namely the name calling technique, were used effectively by the left-wing parties to emphasize specific ideological traditions in conservatism and to link the conservative parties to the United States of America for strategic purposes. The author contends that political advertisements are complex expressions of a party's ideology and goals, thus this campaign tool ought to be studied more by Canadian academics.