Public Sector Financial Reporting Collection

  • 119
  • 0
  • COVID-19 and Xenophobia
    COVID-19 and Xenophobia
    On January 30th, 2020 the World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in response to a new coronavirus disease: COVID-19. Worldwide, as of June 8th, there were over 6,500,000 cases confirmed; over 380,000 confirmed deaths; and, 216 countries, areas, and territories impacted (WHO, 2020). In Canada, there has been over 96,000 confirmed cases, and over 7,800 reported deaths (Public Health Canada, 2020). The virus is reported to have been first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in December 2019. Although there are speculations, its exact origin remains unknown. Other regions of the world, including the Americas, the Middle East, Europe, and more recently South America, became epicentres of the outbreak., Spade, C. & Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement (2020) COVID-19 and Xenophobia. Toronto: Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement.
    Discourses of Exclusion and Undesirability: The Designated Countries of Origin Policy and its Impact on Hungarian Romani Refugee Claimants
    Discourses of Exclusion and Undesirability: The Designated Countries of Origin Policy and its Impact on Hungarian Romani Refugee Claimants
    For years, government actors defended the Designated Countries of Origin (DCO) policy as a necessary tool to curb the alleged abuse of Canada’s refugee determination system. The DCO policy, however, had garnered a lot of criticism over its restrictive provisions which have targeted nationals of specific countries, making it harder for them to obtain refugee status in Canada. As a result of these conflicting perspectives, the following working paper will explain that the DCO policy was an exclusionary refugee policy that unjustly limited the ability for nationals of DCO countries (DCOs) to obtain refugee status in Canada. It will demonstrate that actors of the Canadian Government, through mainly the former Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism (the Minister), reinforced discourses of exclusion to justify the DCO policy’s implementation as necessary. By exemplifying the DCO policy’s impact on the Romani people of Hungary, this paper will expose how exclusionary refugee policies, and the discourses that substantiate them, represent the widely embedded and deeply discriminatory belief that some refugee claimants are less desirable than others., Koumantaros, J., & Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement. Discourses of Exclusion and Undesirability: The Designated Countries of Origin Policy and its Impact on Hungarian Romani Refugee Claimants. Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement.
    People’s Pantry and creating inclusive spaces for migrants during the pandemic
    People’s Pantry and creating inclusive spaces for migrants during the pandemic
    In the realm of informality Coronavirus, similar to and yet different from other modern shocks, strips individuals, communities and societies of their stability. The shock manifests itself differently on each of these scales and on each individual’s intersection of factors. Nevertheless, it always disturbs the sense of predictability., Formanowicz, D., & Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement (2020) People’s Pantry and creating inclusive spaces for migrants during the pandemic. Toronto: Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement.
    Province of Manitoba Annual Report for the year ended March 31, 2003
    Province of Manitoba Annual Report for the year ended March 31, 2003
    The Annual Report of the Province of Manitoba for the year ended March 31, 2003 completes the government’s accountability reporting for the year. The Report includes a review of this year’s results relative to the government’s budget. It also contains economic statistics and indicators of the financial health of the Province. Included in this Annual Report is Volume 1 of the Public Accounts., Manitoba, Office of the Minister of Finance. (2003). Province of Manitoba Annual Report for the Year Ended March 31, 2003. Winnipeg: Office of the Minister of Finance, 2003.
    The Evolution of EU-Africa Migration Partnerships: Lessons in Transnational Migration Governance
    The Evolution of EU-Africa Migration Partnerships: Lessons in Transnational Migration Governance
    The COVID-19 pandemic put a halt on all return and reintegration measures between Europe and Africa so what is the current situation of migration partnerships and governance and how has it evolved? The perceived rise in migratory movement of African migrants towards Europe created legal and policy chain reactions in Europe focused on stemming irregular migration. These changes include the establishment and externalisation of an EU-led migration governance in Africa and increased EU-African political engagement through migration dialogue and partnerships. This paper takes a deep dive into the evolution and the state of play of EU-Africa migration partnerships to unpack lessons learned on transnational migration governance. Drawing from interviews conducted with different stakeholders and experts including officials in the EU and other international organisations, policy analysts at think tanks as well as academics, this paper aims to make empirical contributions to the discourse on migration partnerships and governance., Olakpe, O., & Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement. (2020). The Evolution of EU-Africa Migration Partnerships: Lessons in Transnational Migration Governance. Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement.
    ‘Safe’ countries and ‘fraudulent’ refugees: Tools for narrowing access to Canada’s refugee system
    ‘Safe’ countries and ‘fraudulent’ refugees: Tools for narrowing access to Canada’s refugee system
    Refugee protection is an exceptional form of surrogate protection reserved for those who are outside of their country of origin and who have a ‘well-founded’ fear of experiencing persecution upon return (Refugee Convention, 1951). The vast majority of countries in the world – 145 – are signatories to the International Refugee Convention (1951) which recognizes the rights of refugees, the responsibilities of states to provide protection to refugees, and the necessity of international cooperation to strengthen access to protection for refugees globally. In the absence of a legally binding framework however, states are able to interpret through domestic legislation the quality and extent of their participation in the international refugee regime (Milner, 2016). In this Spotlight on Migration, we discuss how the discourses of ‘safe’ countries and ‘fraudulent’ refugees underpinning past and current refugee policies, including the Safe Third Country agreement, the Designated Country of Origin policy, and recent changes to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act through Bill C-97, have been used to limit access to Canada’s refugee system., Spade, C., McDermott, T., & Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement (2020). ‘Safe’ countries and ‘fraudulent’ refugees: Tools for narrowing access to Canada’s refugee system. Toronto: Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement.