Research

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  • ‘Identi-city’: Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto
    ‘Identi-city’: Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto
    Each year, at the start of the winter semester, undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and staff, and invited guests come together to take part in the annual Collaborative Exercise (CEx) held at the Department of Architectural Science at Ryerson University. The five-day event challenges students to address an important contemporary issue. The intention of the exercise is to engage students to collaborate, think and design, while investigating a topic related to architecture and the built environment. Through this experience, students have the opportunity to work with students from other years in the Department’s program, to achieve a common design goal. The Collaborative Exercise ends with an exhibition at the Paul H. Cocker Gallery in the Ryerson University’s Architecture Building. This book showcases the outcomes of the 2014 Collaborative Exercise, entitled ‘Identi-city’ – Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto., Kapelos, G. T. (Ed.). (2017). ‘Identi-city’: Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto. Toronto, ON, Canada: Department of Architectural Science, Faculty of Engineering & Architectural Science, Ryerson University.
    ‘Reinventing’ the third sector: alternative service delivery, partnerships and the new public administration of the Canadian post-welfare state
    ‘Reinventing’ the third sector: alternative service delivery, partnerships and the new public administration of the Canadian post-welfare state
    [First paragraph of Introduction]: The neo-liberal assault on the Keynesian welfare state and the demand that government be 'reinvented' has come to focus increased attention upon the so-called `third sector'. This has occurred because of the moves by neo-liberal governments to downloading former public responsibilities onto the market, nonprofit organizations and individuals; their desire to forge new partnership relationships with non-state actors like voluntary bodies in order to develop alternative service delivery options; and the neo-liberal assertion that intrusive government has worked to undermine voluntary citizen participation, charitable giving, and self-help. Keywords: CVSS, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Working Paper Series,TRSM, Ted Rogers School of Management Citation:, Evans, B. M. & Shields, J. (1998). ‘Reinventing’ the Third Sector: Alternative Service Delivery, Partnerships and the New Public Administration of the Canadian Post-Welfare State. (Working paper Volume 1998 (1)). Toronto : Ted Rogers School of Management, Centre for Volunteer Sector Studies, Ryerson University.
    “If you are in Palermo, you are a Palermitan": An Interview with Mayor Leoluca Orlando
    “If you are in Palermo, you are a Palermitan": An Interview with Mayor Leoluca Orlando
    Leoluca Orlando was born in 1947 in the Sicilian city of Palermo. After studying in Heidelberg, Germany, and Palermo, he worked as a professor of public law at the University of Palermo. In 1985, Palermo’s city council elected Orlando for the first time as Mayor. Currently, he serves his fifth term. In between, he also had seats in the European and the Italian Parliaments, and he served as opposition leader in the Sicilian Parliament. In his first term as Mayor, he took up the fight against the Sicilian mafia; today he fights against racism and the restrictive migration policies of Italy’s national government and the European Union., Bauder, H. (2019).“If you are in Palermo, you are a Palermitan": An interview with Mayor Leoluca Orlando. Toronto: Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement.
    “No Apple iPhone? You must be Canadian”:  mobile technologies, participatory culture, and rhetorical transformation
    “No Apple iPhone? You must be Canadian”: mobile technologies, participatory culture, and rhetorical transformation
    Abstract: Participation with new mobile devices drives new social practices. This article engages in a close analysis of a so-called participatory culture surrounding iPods and iPhones. It offers close rhetorical readings of object phenomena including advertisements, Canadian news stories, and consumer reactions in electronic media. More specifically, this article reveals a rhetorical transformation between the iPod Silhouettes advertising campaign and the iPhone release campaign, causing a shift in subjectivity; iPod subjects are afforded a degree of freedom and play, while iPhone subjects are bound to regimes of work. It is also argued that news stories that emerged in the summer of 2007, when the iPhone was not released in Canada, structure a rhetoric of the “excluded Canadian.” Keywords: Mobile communication; Rhetoric; Visual communication, Pedersen, I. (2008). “No Apple iPhone? You Must Be Canadian”:. Canadian Journal of Communication, 33, 491-510.
    “The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years
    “The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years
    Objectivism, the libertarian philosophy established by Ayn Rand during the postwar years, has attracted a great deal of attention from philosophers, political scientists, economists, and English professors alike in recent years, but it hasn’t received much notice from historians with an interest in education. This article will address that problem by discussing how Rand and her followers established a philosophy of education during the 1960s and 1970s that was based, in part, on vilifying the so-called collectivist ideas of John Dewey and lionizing the so-called individualist ideas of Maria Montessori. Unfortunately, the narrative that emerged during this time seriously misrepresented the ideas of both Dewey and Montessori, resulting in a somewhat distorted view of both educators, Reid, J. (2013, Spring). “The Ayn Rand School for Tots”: John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Objectivist Educational Philosophy during the Postwar Years. Historical Studies in Education / Revue D'histoire De L'education, 73-94.