Research

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  • Author identifier analysis: Name authority control in two institutional repositories
    Author identifier analysis: Name authority control in two institutional repositories
    The aim of this poster is to analyze name authority control in two institutional repositories to determine the extent to which faculty researchers are represented in researcher identifier databases. A purposive sample of 50 faculty authors from Florida Southern College (FSC) and Ryerson University (RU) were compared against five different authority databases: Library of Congress Name Authority File (LCNAF), Scopus, Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID), Virtual International Authority File (VIAF), and International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI). We first analyzed the results locally, then compared them between the two institutions. The findings show that while LCNAF and Scopus results are comparable between the two institutions, the difference in the ORCID, VIAF, and ISNI are considerable. Additionally, the results show that the majority of authors at each institution are represented in two or three external databases. This has implications for enhancing local authority data by linking to external identifier authority data to augment institutional repository metadata., Morgan, M., & Eichenlaub, N. (2018, November). Author Identifier Analysis: Name Authority Control in Two Institutional Repositories. In International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications (pp. 113-116).
    Autoethnography & Goffman`s Asylums: Re-Storying Mental Illness
    Autoethnography & Goffman`s Asylums: Re-Storying Mental Illness
    Mental illness narratives occupy a small, unstable place within critical discourse. Within both research and social practices, mental illness is often seen as a limitation instead of an alternative way of knowing, and thus, personal accounts are swept aside in favor of more “objective” research. In 1961, famed sociologist Erving Goffman published Asylums: Essays on the social situation of mental patients and other inmates after observing the daily life of a mental institution. While the book breathed life into the deinstitutionalization movement, it also undermined the narrative autonomy of the patients that it spoke for. In this paper, autoethnography is used to complement and challenge Goffman’s research, while arguing that there is a better way of positioning the patient narrative within mental health research. It is a way of reconciling my identities as a person with mental illness and an academic, and bringing lived experience to the forefront of mental health discourse, where it belongs.
    Automatic landmark point detection and tracking for human facial expressions
    Automatic landmark point detection and tracking for human facial expressions
    Facial landmarks are a set of salient points, usually located on the corners, tips or mid points of the facial components. Reliable facial landmarks and their associated detection and tracking algorithms can be widely used for representing the important visual features for face registration and expression recognition. In this paper we propose an efficient and robust method for facial landmark detection and tracking from video sequences. We select 26 landmark points on the facial region to facilitate the analysis of human facial expressions. They are detected in the first input frame by the scale invariant feature based detectors. Multiple Differential Evolution-Markov Chain (DE-MC) particle filters are applied for tracking these points through the video sequences. A kernel correlation analysis approach is proposed to find the detection likelihood by maximizing a similarity criterion between the target points and the candidate points. The detection likelihood is then integrated into the tracker’s observation likelihood. Sampling efficiency is improved and minimal amount of computation is achieved by using the intermediate results obtained in particle allocations. Three public databases are used for experiments and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method., Tie, Y., & Guan, L. (2013). Automatic landmark point detection and tracking for human facial expressions. EURASIP Journal on Image and Video Processing, 2013(1), 1-15.
    Automation Across the Nation: Understanding the potential impacts of technological trends across Canada
    Automation Across the Nation: Understanding the potential impacts of technological trends across Canada
    The advent and rapid adoption of new technologies, such as machine learning and advanced robotics, have resurfaced concerns over technology eliminating jobs. Many now worry that more jobs are at risk than ever before. However, this debate all too often ignores the complexity of technology’s relationship to labour. Technological advancements throughout Canada’s history have helped to drive innovation and raise productivity, improve wealth and increase consumption, and give rise to entirely new industries and economic opportunities. As a result, in the long run technology has often helped to produce more jobs than it destroyed., Lamb, C., & Lo, M. (2017, June). Automation across the nation: understanding the potential impacts of technological trends across Canada., For more information contact: The Brookfield Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship brookfieldinstitute.ca
    Balancing the Medicine Wheel through Physical Activity
    Balancing the Medicine Wheel through Physical Activity
    This article highlights the findings of a research project based on the medicine wheel teachings of balance between the physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional aspects of oneself. Specifically, this traditional approach to understanding health was used to explore the impacts of physical activity on emotional, spiritual and mental well-being. Four female participants in a martial arts program at an urban Friendship Centre told their stories at two sharing circles. Afterwards, they were given six weeks to develop symbols that represented the meaning of the martial arts program to them and how it had impacted their lives. The participants named this second method “Anishnaabe Symbol-Based Reflection.” This article provides a brief overview of these Indigenous methods and explains how they were applied to this research project. The article then focuses on two key themes that emerged from the Aboriginal women’s stories: issues related to identity and to a sense of not deserving good things in life. The women described how they were able to work through some of their identity issues and their low sense of self-worth through their participation in the martial arts program., Online version of an article originally published as: Balancing the Medicine Wheel through Physical Activity, Journal de la santé autochtone 4(1), March 2008. Publisher URL: http://www.naho.ca/french/journal_V04_01.php
    Bedrooms in the sky : is Toronto building the right condo supply?
    Bedrooms in the sky : is Toronto building the right condo supply?
    A report by the Ryerson City Building Institute and Urbanation examines condos under development in the GTA to understand how well the incoming supply will accommodate the region’s housing affordability challenges and changing demographics., Burda, C., Haines, G. & Hildebrand, S. (2017). Bedrooms in the sky : is Toronto building the right condo supply? Toronto: Ryerson City Building Institute.
    Behavior of reinforced high and ultra high strength concrete beams
    Behavior of reinforced high and ultra high strength concrete beams
    Load-deflection behaviour of reinforced beams with high strength concrete (HSC) and ultra high strength concrete (UHSC) were studied based on experimental investigations. Four concretes including one HSC and three UHSC were considered for construction of beam specimens. Two different cross-sections of reinforced beams namely Type A and Type B were considered for testing under single point loading. In addition, three sets of Type B beam were tested with three different shear span to depth ratio (a/d) for each concrete mix. The test results confirmed that flexural strength of fibre reinforced concrete increases with the increase of compressive strength of concrete and the initial stiffness of UHSC are very high compared to HSC. It was observed that Type B beam with a/d ratio less than 2 show the pattern of shear failure. As such, a theoretical model was studied to verify the performance and the shear load capacity of beams.
    Behaviour and Misbehaviour of Latino Children in a Time of Zero Tolerance: Mothers’ Views
    Behaviour and Misbehaviour of Latino Children in a Time of Zero Tolerance: Mothers’ Views
    Online version of an article originally published as: Bernhard, J., Freire, M., Bascunan, L., Arenas, R., Verga, N. R., & Gana, D. (2004). Behaviour and misbehaviour of Latino children in a time of zero tolerance: Mothers' views. Early Years, 24(1): 49-62. Publisher URL: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a713620440
    Benefits and Challenges to People with Psychiatric Disabilities Who Volunteer
    Benefits and Challenges to People with Psychiatric Disabilities Who Volunteer
    This research follows from the research reported in CVSS Working Paper Series, Volume 2007 (2). In that paper we presented the results of our examination of volunteer programs in ten organizations serving people with psychiatric disabilities2. We described the nature of the programs, identified best practices and discussed the challenges and benefits they presented. This paper focuses on the responses of 27 people with psychiatric disabilities to a questionnaire probing their volunteering experiences. Please refer to the previous CVSS Working Paper titled “Client Volunteering in Organizations Serving Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities” for a detailed review of the literature. Here we will briefly summarize the major thrust of the literature review. Keywords: CVSS, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Working Paper Series,TRSM, Ted Rogers School of Management Citation:, Meinhard, A., Greenspan, I., Peterson, J., & Livingstone, P. (2007) Benefits and challenges to people with psychiatric disabilities who volunteer (Working Paper Series Volume 2007 (3)). Toronto: Ted Rogers School of Management, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Ryerson University.
    Benefits and challenges of EMR implementations in low resource settings: a state-of-the-art review
    Benefits and challenges of EMR implementations in low resource settings: a state-of-the-art review
    Background The intent of this review is to discover the types of inquiry and range of objectives and outcomes addressed in studies of the impacts of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) implementations in limited resource settings in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods A state-of-the-art review characterized relevant publications from bibliographic databases and grey literature repositories through systematic searching, concept-mapping, relevance and quality filter optimization, methods and outcomes categorization and key article analysis. Results From an initial population of 749 domain articles published before February 2015, 32 passed context and methods filters to merit full-text analysis. Relevant literature was classified by type (e.g., secondary, primary), design (e.g., case series, intervention), focus (e.g., processes, outcomes) and context (e.g., location, organization). A conceptual framework of EMR implementation determinants (systems, people, processes, products) was developed to represent current knowledge about the effects of EMRs in resource-constrained settings and to facilitate comparisons with studies in other contexts. Discussion This review provides an overall impression of the types and content of health informatics articles about EMR implementations in sub-Saharan Africa. Little is known about the unique effects of EMR efforts in slum settings. The available reports emphasize the complexity and impact of social considerations, outweighing product and system limitations. Summative guides and implementation toolkits were not found but could help EMR implementers. Conclusion The future of EMR implementation in sub-Saharan Africa is promising. This review reveals various examples and gaps in understanding how EMR implementations unfold in resource-constrained settings; and opportunities for new inquiry about how to improve deployments in those contexts., Jawhari, B., Ludwick, D., Keenan, L., Zakus, D., & Hayward, R. (2016). Benefits and challenges of EMR implementations in low resource settings: A state-of-the-art review. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 16(1) doi:10.1186/s12911-016-0354-8
    Between Rhetoric and Propaganda: A Case Study of Appeals to Pathos in Iraq War Justification
    Between Rhetoric and Propaganda: A Case Study of Appeals to Pathos in Iraq War Justification
    This MRP explores the ethical dilemma inherent in the use of emotional appeals in political speeches. Taking a historical approach to the question of how ethics and emotion have played out in rhetorical theory and propaganda studies, I examine how political speakers use rhetorical appeals to pathos in order to gain support for controversial policies. I question where the “line” between legitimate rhetorical appeals to pathos and illegitimate, emotionally manipulative propaganda lies, and ask: do appeals to emotion constitute propaganda? What is the difference between a legitimate appeal to emotion and propaganda? What constitutes a “legitimate” appeal to emotion in political speech? To answer this, I analyze three speeches made by Western political leaders justifying America’s decision to invade Iraq in 2003. My analysis distinguishes different kinds of appeals to pathos, or emotion, within my data set and weighs each speaker’s use of “legitimate” appeals to pathos against emotional appeals that are classified as “propaganda,” according to Elspeth Tilley’s Propaganda Index (2005). My findings show that a large percentage of appeals to pathos in each speech analyzed meet the requirements for propaganda as defined by Tilley. Eighty-one percent of appeals to pathos in George W. Bush’s “Message to Saddam” constitute propaganda; sixty-eight percent of appeals to pathos in Tony Blair’s Speech to the British House of Commons constitute propaganda; and seventy-three percent of appeals to pathos in Stephen Harper’s Speech to the Canadian House of Commons are considered propaganda as defined by Tilley. My findings showcase the ambiguity of “ethical” communication in political contexts, and underline the importance of critical audience engagement in political processes.