Research

  • 20601
  • 0
  • Asymptotic Theory Of Stochastic Choice Functionals For Prospects With Embedded Comotonic Probability Measures
    Asymptotic Theory Of Stochastic Choice Functionals For Prospects With Embedded Comotonic Probability Measures
    We introduce a monotone class theory of Prospect Theory's value functions, which shows that they can be replaced almost surely by a topological lifting comprised of a class of compact isomorphic maps that embed weakly co-monotonic probability measures, attached to state space, in outcome space. Thus, agents solve a signal extraction problem to obtain estimates of empirical probability weights for prospects under risk and uncertainty. By virtue of the topological lifting, we prove an almost sure isomorphism theorem between compact stochastic choice operators, and well defined outcomes which, under Brouwer-Schauder theory, guarantees fixed point convergence in convex choice sets. Along the way we introduce a risk operator in the Hoffman-Jorgensen class of lifting operators, and value function [averaging] operators with respect to Radon measure. In that set up, suitable binary operations on gain-loss space show that our risk operator is isometric for gains and skewed for losses. The point spectrum from this operator constitutes the range of admissible observations for loss aversion index in a well designed experiment.
    Asynchronous Computer Conferencing in the MBA Classroom
    Asynchronous Computer Conferencing in the MBA Classroom
    Two asynchronous conferencing systems were used in subsequent years in a management skills course. These systems had comparable technological features but were not equally effective in supporting the course. This paper examines differences in the systems and their deployment that led to the success of one and the failure of the other. Data from student surveys show differences in user behaviors and attitudes toward the two systems. Qualitative data help to reveal the importance of pedagogy, technology, systems implementation and user behavior as determinants of successful technological innovation. A model for technological innovation in the classroom is proposed., Middleton, C. A. (1999). Asynchronous computer conferencing in the MBA classroom. Paper presented at the , Track1 10 pp. doi:10.1109/HICSS.1999.772696
    Author identifier analysis: Name authority control in two institutional repositories
    Author identifier analysis: Name authority control in two institutional repositories
    The aim of this poster is to analyze name authority control in two institutional repositories to determine the extent to which faculty researchers are represented in researcher identifier databases. A purposive sample of 50 faculty authors from Florida Southern College (FSC) and Ryerson University (RU) were compared against five different authority databases: Library of Congress Name Authority File (LCNAF), Scopus, Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID), Virtual International Authority File (VIAF), and International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI). We first analyzed the results locally, then compared them between the two institutions. The findings show that while LCNAF and Scopus results are comparable between the two institutions, the difference in the ORCID, VIAF, and ISNI are considerable. Additionally, the results show that the majority of authors at each institution are represented in two or three external databases. This has implications for enhancing local authority data by linking to external identifier authority data to augment institutional repository metadata., Morgan, M., & Eichenlaub, N. (2018, November). Author Identifier Analysis: Name Authority Control in Two Institutional Repositories. In International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications (pp. 113-116).
    Autoethnography & Goffman`s Asylums: Re-Storying Mental Illness
    Autoethnography & Goffman`s Asylums: Re-Storying Mental Illness
    Mental illness narratives occupy a small, unstable place within critical discourse. Within both research and social practices, mental illness is often seen as a limitation instead of an alternative way of knowing, and thus, personal accounts are swept aside in favor of more “objective” research. In 1961, famed sociologist Erving Goffman published Asylums: Essays on the social situation of mental patients and other inmates after observing the daily life of a mental institution. While the book breathed life into the deinstitutionalization movement, it also undermined the narrative autonomy of the patients that it spoke for. In this paper, autoethnography is used to complement and challenge Goffman’s research, while arguing that there is a better way of positioning the patient narrative within mental health research. It is a way of reconciling my identities as a person with mental illness and an academic, and bringing lived experience to the forefront of mental health discourse, where it belongs.
    Automatic landmark point detection and tracking for human facial expressions
    Automatic landmark point detection and tracking for human facial expressions
    Facial landmarks are a set of salient points, usually located on the corners, tips or mid points of the facial components. Reliable facial landmarks and their associated detection and tracking algorithms can be widely used for representing the important visual features for face registration and expression recognition. In this paper we propose an efficient and robust method for facial landmark detection and tracking from video sequences. We select 26 landmark points on the facial region to facilitate the analysis of human facial expressions. They are detected in the first input frame by the scale invariant feature based detectors. Multiple Differential Evolution-Markov Chain (DE-MC) particle filters are applied for tracking these points through the video sequences. A kernel correlation analysis approach is proposed to find the detection likelihood by maximizing a similarity criterion between the target points and the candidate points. The detection likelihood is then integrated into the tracker’s observation likelihood. Sampling efficiency is improved and minimal amount of computation is achieved by using the intermediate results obtained in particle allocations. Three public databases are used for experiments and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method., Tie, Y., & Guan, L. (2013). Automatic landmark point detection and tracking for human facial expressions. EURASIP Journal on Image and Video Processing, 2013(1), 1-15.
    Automation Across the Nation: Understanding the potential impacts of technological trends across Canada
    Automation Across the Nation: Understanding the potential impacts of technological trends across Canada
    The advent and rapid adoption of new technologies, such as machine learning and advanced robotics, have resurfaced concerns over technology eliminating jobs. Many now worry that more jobs are at risk than ever before. However, this debate all too often ignores the complexity of technology’s relationship to labour. Technological advancements throughout Canada’s history have helped to drive innovation and raise productivity, improve wealth and increase consumption, and give rise to entirely new industries and economic opportunities. As a result, in the long run technology has often helped to produce more jobs than it destroyed., Lamb, C., & Lo, M. (2017, June). Automation across the nation: understanding the potential impacts of technological trends across Canada., For more information contact: The Brookfield Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship brookfieldinstitute.ca
    Balancing the Medicine Wheel through Physical Activity
    Balancing the Medicine Wheel through Physical Activity
    Online version of an article originally published as: Balancing the Medicine Wheel through Physical Activity, Journal de la santé autochtone 4(1), March 2008. Publisher URL: http://www.naho.ca/french/journal_V04_01.php
    Barriers vs. bridges: Undocumented immigrants’ access to post-secondary education in Ontario
    Barriers vs. bridges: Undocumented immigrants’ access to post-secondary education in Ontario
    Introduction: The governance of migration and human mobility is a contentious matter, and it has only become more prominent in public, political, and legal spheres. One of the most challenging issues is how to protect and promote the rights of undocumented immigrants, who face multiple forms of legal and social exclusion. In the face of public pressure to control borders, governments must decide whether persons already living and working in cities, towns, and rural areas should be able to access public services, such as health and education. The question of education has become more prominent in the United States and Canada. The norm is for governments and schools to deny or outright exclude undocumented persons from accessing education, but this has been changing in certain jurisdictions, including sanctuary cities and states. Canadian policies are also changing. Although access to education in publicly-funded institutions is currently a legal right for all residents of Ontario (subject to some qualifications unrelated to immigration status), attaining access remains a challenge for undocumented immigrants. Recently, activists have been pushing for a right to access higher education in universities and colleges. Even if not provided for in domestic law, access to education is a legal right under international law. The UN Commission on Human Rights notes that the right to education has a special function, in that it “unlocks other rights when guaranteed, while its denial leads to compounded denials of other human rights and perpetuation of poverty” (UN Commission on Human Rights, 2004, p. 7). Others describe education as an “empowerment right” (Kalantry, Getgen, & Koh, 2010, p. 260; UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights [CESCR], 1999). This paper examines existing barriers that undocumented immigrants face if they wish to access post-secondary education in Ontario, Canada. It also addresses the policies that Canadian universities have implemented (or plan to implement) to remove these barriers, thereby allowing undocumented immigrants to obtain formal post-secondary education. It argues that access to higher education is a binding international human right and that provincial governments and universities should ensure access. The primary questions that this research paper aims to address are the following: • What are the legal, procedural, and/or financial barriers to accessing post-secondary education? • Are provincial governments implementing policies to remove these barriers? If so, what are they? • Are Canadian universities implementing policies to remove these barriers? If so, what are they? By addressing key obstacles and identifying possible solutions, we can better advocate for appropriate policy changes. Whereas there is significant literature on this topic in the US, there is far less information in the Canadian context; it is an important matter to bring to the forefront of both Canadian immigration and education policy discussions. Since the constant threat of deportation serves as a silencing mechanism and form of political suppression, it is important to advocate with and, when necessary, on behalf of undocumented migrants. My research will help shed more light on this concern and amplify the need for governments/institutions to find pragmatic ways to resolve this issue., Armanyous, M., Hudson, G. (2019). Barriers vs. bridges: Undocumented immigrants’ access to post-secondary education in Ontario. RCIS Working Paper No. 5. Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement.
    Bedrooms in the sky : is Toronto building the right condo supply?
    Bedrooms in the sky : is Toronto building the right condo supply?
    A report by the Ryerson City Building Institute and Urbanation examines condos under development in the GTA to understand how well the incoming supply will accommodate the region’s housing affordability challenges and changing demographics., Burda, C., Haines, G. & Hildebrand, S. (2017). Bedrooms in the sky : is Toronto building the right condo supply? Toronto: Ryerson City Building Institute.
    Behavior of reinforced high and ultra high strength concrete beams
    Behavior of reinforced high and ultra high strength concrete beams
    Load-deflection behaviour of reinforced beams with high strength concrete (HSC) and ultra high strength concrete (UHSC) were studied based on experimental investigations. Four concretes including one HSC and three UHSC were considered for construction of beam specimens. Two different cross-sections of reinforced beams namely Type A and Type B were considered for testing under single point loading. In addition, three sets of Type B beam were tested with three different shear span to depth ratio (a/d) for each concrete mix. The test results confirmed that flexural strength of fibre reinforced concrete increases with the increase of compressive strength of concrete and the initial stiffness of UHSC are very high compared to HSC. It was observed that Type B beam with a/d ratio less than 2 show the pattern of shear failure. As such, a theoretical model was studied to verify the performance and the shear load capacity of beams.