Research

  • 18232
  • 0
  • Behavior of reinforced high and ultra high strength concrete beams
    Behavior of reinforced high and ultra high strength concrete beams
    Load-deflection behaviour of reinforced beams with high strength concrete (HSC) and ultra high strength concrete (UHSC) were studied based on experimental investigations. Four concretes including one HSC and three UHSC were considered for construction of beam specimens. Two different cross-sections of reinforced beams namely Type A and Type B were considered for testing under single point loading. In addition, three sets of Type B beam were tested with three different shear span to depth ratio (a/d) for each concrete mix. The test results confirmed that flexural strength of fibre reinforced concrete increases with the increase of compressive strength of concrete and the initial stiffness of UHSC are very high compared to HSC. It was observed that Type B beam with a/d ratio less than 2 show the pattern of shear failure. As such, a theoretical model was studied to verify the performance and the shear load capacity of beams.
    Behaviour and Misbehaviour of Latino Children in a Time of Zero Tolerance: Mothers’ Views
    Behaviour and Misbehaviour of Latino Children in a Time of Zero Tolerance: Mothers’ Views
    Online version of an article originally published as: Bernhard, J., Freire, M., Bascunan, L., Arenas, R., Verga, N. R., & Gana, D. (2004). Behaviour and misbehaviour of Latino children in a time of zero tolerance: Mothers' views. Early Years, 24(1): 49-62. Publisher URL: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a713620440
    Benefits and Challenges to People with Psychiatric Disabilities Who Volunteer
    Benefits and Challenges to People with Psychiatric Disabilities Who Volunteer
    This research follows from the research reported in CVSS Working Paper Series, Volume 2007 (2). In that paper we presented the results of our examination of volunteer programs in ten organizations serving people with psychiatric disabilities2. We described the nature of the programs, identified best practices and discussed the challenges and benefits they presented. This paper focuses on the responses of 27 people with psychiatric disabilities to a questionnaire probing their volunteering experiences. Please refer to the previous CVSS Working Paper titled “Client Volunteering in Organizations Serving Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities” for a detailed review of the literature. Here we will briefly summarize the major thrust of the literature review. Keywords: CVSS, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Working Paper Series,TRSM, Ted Rogers School of Management Citation:, Meinhard, A., Greenspan, I., Peterson, J., & Livingstone, P. (2007) Benefits and challenges to people with psychiatric disabilities who volunteer (Working Paper Series Volume 2007 (3)). Toronto: Ted Rogers School of Management, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Ryerson University.
    Benefits and challenges of EMR implementations in low resource settings: a state-of-the-art review
    Benefits and challenges of EMR implementations in low resource settings: a state-of-the-art review
    Background The intent of this review is to discover the types of inquiry and range of objectives and outcomes addressed in studies of the impacts of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) implementations in limited resource settings in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods A state-of-the-art review characterized relevant publications from bibliographic databases and grey literature repositories through systematic searching, concept-mapping, relevance and quality filter optimization, methods and outcomes categorization and key article analysis. Results From an initial population of 749 domain articles published before February 2015, 32 passed context and methods filters to merit full-text analysis. Relevant literature was classified by type (e.g., secondary, primary), design (e.g., case series, intervention), focus (e.g., processes, outcomes) and context (e.g., location, organization). A conceptual framework of EMR implementation determinants (systems, people, processes, products) was developed to represent current knowledge about the effects of EMRs in resource-constrained settings and to facilitate comparisons with studies in other contexts. Discussion This review provides an overall impression of the types and content of health informatics articles about EMR implementations in sub-Saharan Africa. Little is known about the unique effects of EMR efforts in slum settings. The available reports emphasize the complexity and impact of social considerations, outweighing product and system limitations. Summative guides and implementation toolkits were not found but could help EMR implementers. Conclusion The future of EMR implementation in sub-Saharan Africa is promising. This review reveals various examples and gaps in understanding how EMR implementations unfold in resource-constrained settings; and opportunities for new inquiry about how to improve deployments in those contexts., Jawhari, B., Ludwick, D., Keenan, L., Zakus, D., & Hayward, R. (2016). Benefits and challenges of EMR implementations in low resource settings: A state-of-the-art review. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 16(1) doi:10.1186/s12911-016-0354-8
    Between Rhetoric and Propaganda: A Case Study of Appeals to Pathos in Iraq War Justification
    Between Rhetoric and Propaganda: A Case Study of Appeals to Pathos in Iraq War Justification
    This MRP explores the ethical dilemma inherent in the use of emotional appeals in political speeches. Taking a historical approach to the question of how ethics and emotion have played out in rhetorical theory and propaganda studies, I examine how political speakers use rhetorical appeals to pathos in order to gain support for controversial policies. I question where the “line” between legitimate rhetorical appeals to pathos and illegitimate, emotionally manipulative propaganda lies, and ask: do appeals to emotion constitute propaganda? What is the difference between a legitimate appeal to emotion and propaganda? What constitutes a “legitimate” appeal to emotion in political speech? To answer this, I analyze three speeches made by Western political leaders justifying America’s decision to invade Iraq in 2003. My analysis distinguishes different kinds of appeals to pathos, or emotion, within my data set and weighs each speaker’s use of “legitimate” appeals to pathos against emotional appeals that are classified as “propaganda,” according to Elspeth Tilley’s Propaganda Index (2005). My findings show that a large percentage of appeals to pathos in each speech analyzed meet the requirements for propaganda as defined by Tilley. Eighty-one percent of appeals to pathos in George W. Bush’s “Message to Saddam” constitute propaganda; sixty-eight percent of appeals to pathos in Tony Blair’s Speech to the British House of Commons constitute propaganda; and seventy-three percent of appeals to pathos in Stephen Harper’s Speech to the Canadian House of Commons are considered propaganda as defined by Tilley. My findings showcase the ambiguity of “ethical” communication in political contexts, and underline the importance of critical audience engagement in political processes.
    Beyond Access: Engaging Citizens in the Information Society
    Beyond Access: Engaging Citizens in the Information Society
    Presentation: Expert Policy Forum on Building Capacity: Tackling Ontario's Digital Challenge, Toronto, September 2007., Presentation: Expert Policy Forum on Building Capacity: Tackling Ontario's Digital Challenge, Toronto, September 2007.
    Beyond broadband access: what do we need to measure and how do we measure it?
    Beyond broadband access: what do we need to measure and how do we measure it?
    Presentation on broadband use and information society outcomes (impacts)., Middleton, C.A. (1998). Beyond broadband access: what do we need to measure, and how do we measure it? [PowerPoint Slides]
    Beyond gamification: reconceptualizing game-based learning in early childhood environments
    Beyond gamification: reconceptualizing game-based learning in early childhood environments
    The recent promotion and adoption of digital game-based learning (DGBL) in K-12 education presents compelling opportunities as well as challenges for early childhood educators who seek to critically, equitably and holistically support the learning and play of today's so-called digital natives. However, with most DGBL initiatives focused on the increasingly standardized ‘accountability’ models found in K-12 educational institutions, the authors ask whose priorities, identities and notions of play this model reinforces or neglects. Drawing on the literatures of early childhood studies, game-based learning, and game studies, they seek to illuminate the informal contexts of play within the ‘hidden’ and ‘null’ curricula of DGBL that do not fit within the efficiency models of mainstream education in North America. In the absence of a common critical or theoretical foundation for DGBL, they propose a conceptual framework that challenges what they regard to be the institutionally nullified dimensions of autonomy, play, affinity and space that are essential to DGBL. They contend that these dimensions are ideally situated within the inclusive and play-based curriculum early childhood learning environments, and that the early years constitute a critically significant, yet overlooked, location for more holistic and inclusive thinking on DGBL., Nolan, J. & McBride, M. (2013). Beyond gamification: reconceptualizing game-based learning in early childhood environments. Information, Communication & Society, 17(5), 594-608. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1369118x.2013.808365
    Bibliography on Immigration and Settlement in the Toronto Area, Third Edition
    Bibliography on Immigration and Settlement in the Toronto Area, Third Edition
    CERIS Working Paper No. 65. Also available online: http://www.ceris.metropolis.net/wp-content/uploads/pdf/research_publication/working_papers/wp65.pdf
    Bicycling crashes on streetcar (tram) or train tracks: mixed methods to identify prevention measures
    Bicycling crashes on streetcar (tram) or train tracks: mixed methods to identify prevention measures
    Background Streetcar or train tracks in urban areas are difficult for bicyclists to negotiate and are a cause of crashes and injuries. This study used mixed methods to identify measures to prevent such crashes, by examining track-related crashes that resulted in injuries to cyclists, and obtaining information from the local transit agency and bike shops. Methods We compared personal, trip, and route infrastructure characteristics of 87 crashes directly involving streetcar or train tracks to 189 crashes in other circumstances in Toronto, Canada. We complemented this with engineering information about the rail systems, interviews of personnel at seven bike shops about advice they provide to customers, and width measurements of tires on commonly sold bikes. Results In our study, 32 % of injured cyclists had crashes that directly involved tracks. The vast majority resulted from the bike tire being caught in the rail flangeway (gap in the road surface alongside rails), often when cyclists made unplanned maneuvers to avoid a collision. Track crashes were more common on major city streets with parked cars and no bike infrastructure, with left turns at intersections, with hybrid, racing and city bikes, among less experienced and less frequent bicyclists, and among women. Commonly sold bikes typically had tire widths narrower than the smallest track flangeways. There were no track crashes in route sections where streetcars and trains had dedicated rights of way. Conclusions Given our results, prevention efforts might be directed at individual knowledge, bicycle tires, or route design, but their potential for success is likely to differ. Although it may be possible to reach a broader audience with continued advice about how to avoid track crashes, the persistence and frequency of these crashes and their unpredictable circumstances indicates that other solutions are needed. Using tires wider than streetcar or train flangeways could prevent some crashes, though there are other considerations that lead many cyclists to have narrower tires. To prevent the majority of track-involved injuries, route design measures including dedicated rail rights of way, cycle tracks (physically separated bike lanes), and protected intersections would be the best strategy., Teschke, K., Dennis, J., Reynolds, C. C. O., Winters, M., & Harris, M. A. (2016). Bicycling crashes on streetcar (tram) or train tracks: Mixed methods to identify prevention measures. BMC Public Health, 16(1), 617. doi:10.1186/s12889-016-3242-3