Research

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  • Build it and the women will come? WTSN and the advent of Canadian digital television
    Build it and the women will come? WTSN and the advent of Canadian digital television
    Abstract: In fall 2001, over 200 digital television channels were launched in Canada. One of those channels was WTSN (Women's Television Sports Network)-the world's first 24- hour television network exclusively dedicated to broadcasting women's sports. In the fall of 2003, however, WTSN ceased broadcasting operations. This analysis of CRTC policies and personal interview data with Canadian media members argues that while the demise of WTSN can be attributed to the unfortunate pitfalls associated with early digital television rollout and cultural policies, the network's downfall is best explained in substantially more ideological terms. From the outset, WTSN entered uncharted waters in the Canadian television sport landscape, attempting to showcase women's sports to a predominantly female audience-a demographic that has yet to materialize for mainstream sports programming. Résumé : En automne 2001 au Canada a lieu la lancée de plus de 200 chaînes de télévision numériques. Une de ces chaînes est WTSN (Women's Television Sports Network), le premier réseau de télévision au monde entièrement dédié à la diffusion des sports féminins 24 heures sur 24. WTSN, cependant, disparaît des ondes dès l'automne 2003. Cette analyse des politiques du CRTC et d'entrevues menées par l'auteur auprès de professionnels des médias canadiens soutient que, bien qu'on puisse attribuer l'échec de WTSN à certaines politiques culturelles ainsi qu'aux problèmes reliés à l'expansion trop hâtive de la télévision numérique à l'époque, on peut aussi tirer avantage d'une approche plus idéologique pour expliquer la disparition de ce réseau. En effet, en offrant les sports pour femmes à un public composé majoritairement de femmes, WTSN dès ses débuts s'est aventuré dans un territoire inconnu par l'univers des sports sur les ondes canadiennes, la majorité des femmes n'ayant pas encore montré un intérêt soutenu pour la programmation sportive à grand public., Neverson, N. (2010). Build It and the Women Will Come? WTSN and the Advent of Canadian Digital Television. Canadian Journal Of Communication, 35(1). Retrieved from http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/article/view/2246/2990
    Building Wi-Fi Networks for Communities: Three Canadian Cases
    Building Wi-Fi Networks for Communities: Three Canadian Cases
    This paper explores three Canadian wireless network projects that demonstrate that Wi-Fi technologies, like landline telephones, radio, and hydro, can be used to bring services to local communities. It is our position that despite the strengths and weaknesses of Fredericton’s eZone, Montréal’s Île Sans Fil, and the Lac Seul network in Northern Ontario, these three highlighted Wi-Fi networks demonstrate that a public information utilities model is still a useful lens through which to understand the development and implementation of telecommunications in Canada. Through our case studies, we have observed that in order for municipally based and community Wi-Fi networks to successfully take root in a community, it is advantageous to build on existing technological infrastructure. Moreover, municipal and community needs must be considered in the project. Finally, a cohort of interested advocates from the region is needed. Résumé : Cet article explore trois projets canadiens de réseau sans fil qui démontrent qu’on peut utiliser les technologies Wi-Fi à la manière du téléphone traditionnel, de la radio ou du système hydraulique pour servir les communautés. Selon nous, les réseaux Wi-Fi eZone de Frédéricton, Île sans fil de Montréal et Lac Seul du nord de l’Ontario, quels que soient leurs qualités et défauts, démontrent que le modèle d’un service d’information au public demeure utile pour comprendre le développement et l’établissement des télécommunications au Canada. Au moyen de nos études de cas, nous avons remarqué qu’il est avantageux de se fonder sur l’infrastructure technologique existante pour établir avec succès des réseaux Wi-Fi municipaux et communautaires. Par surcroît, il faut tenir compte des besoins municipaux et communautaires dans un projet. En outre, il est nécessaire d’avoir une cohorte de défenseurs provenant de la région impliquée., Middleton, C., & Crow, B. (2008). Building Wi-Fi Networks for Communities: Three Canadian Cases. Canadian Journal Of Communication, 33(3). Retrieved from http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/article/view/2110
    Building a Policy-Oriented Research Partnership for Knowledge Mobilization and Knowledge Transfer: The Case of the Canadian Metropolis Project
    Building a Policy-Oriented Research Partnership for Knowledge Mobilization and Knowledge Transfer: The Case of the Canadian Metropolis Project
    The aim of this paper is to examine government–university–community partnerships for knowledge mobilization (KM) and knowledge transfer (KT) in the area of immigration and settlement research using the illustrative case of the Canadian Metropolis Project. The Metropolis Project in Canada began in 1995 with the goal of enhancing policy-oriented research capacity for immigration and settlement and developing ways to better use this research in government decision-making. Core funding for this partnership was provided jointly by Citizenship Immigration Canada (CIC), a department of the Government of Canada and the primary social science granting agency, the Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). As of 2012, and subsequent to three successful funding phases, the decision was made to end government and SSHRC core funding for this initiative, however, other non-governmental funding avenues are being explored. The longevity of this partnership and the conclusion of this specific initiative present an opportunity to reflect critically on the nature of such partnerships. This paper is an attempt to identify some of the key themes, issues and challenges related to research partnerships, KM and KT. Also, with the aid of an illustrative case, it aims to specify some of the possibilities and limitations of this kind of policy relevant knowledge mobilization. Special consideration will be placed on the context in which the demand for knowledge mobilization and knowledge transfer has emerged. This examination has considerable international relevance as the Canadian Metropolis Project offers the leading example of a research partnership in the field of immigration and settlement., Shields, J., & Evans, B. (2012). Building a policy-oriented research partnership for knowledge mobilization and knowledge transfer: The case of the canadian metropolis project. Administrative Sciences, 2(4), 250-272. doi:10.3390/admsci2040250
    Business Topographies: A Spatiotemporal Analysis of 150 years of Indian Business
    Business Topographies: A Spatiotemporal Analysis of 150 years of Indian Business
    One of the most growing entrepreneurial landscapes has been without a doubt in the last decade India. India, with a total population of almost 1.2 billion inhabitants, is a land of immense business opportunity within a highly competitive market. Before the eighties however, India was mainly a rural country, with a large contrast of the nexus between city and periphery. With the emergence of young generation of entrepreneurs, the economy has been growing at a rate of 8-10% for the last 20 years. The share of the service sector has increased to 60 per cent in the total GDP. The growth rate of India has increased significantly and has been consistent mainly because of the emergence of private sector in general and small business entrepreneurs in particular. The private sector has not only played a significant role in savings but also played pivotal role in investment in the country which has been creating vast job opportunities and gigantic wealth for the country. Thus, the growth of the Indian economy is mainly driven by the private sector. Worldwide the landscape of business has undertaken a paradigm shift. The developing countries have become key drivers of the trajectory of global growth. World has started looking at the growth of India and China from a business perspective, but also in a context of environmental futures. These two economies will be the biggest economies by 2035. However, the change in the industrial and entrepreneurial landscape of India raises up some importance issues related with how is Indian business developing spatially, how its concentrated its growth is and how it is related to Indian transportation systems. Using different stages of Geographic Information Systems, we will answer these three questions by methodologies found in geostatistics, neogeography and spatial analysis. By means of a database of over 3000 businesses in India, we will (i) transform this database to spatially-explicit content through geocoding techniques which shall allow (ii) a geostatistical analysis through the creation of a Getis Ord (Local G) autocorrelation of identifying hot and cold space for entire India over time. This information will be assessed in a combination of volunteered-geographic information (VGI) where the availability of the entire road network of India shall be (iii) compiled on a spatial integrative analysis, allowing to understand the spatial relation of the Local G business hot and cold spots in relation to infrastructures and commutes. These results bring forth a novel approach of combined spatially-explicit methodologies and GIS, which for business analysis seems greatly to be missing and set out to create a new definition missing in literature: Business Topographies. A combined methodology taking forth available datasets brought from VGI related to autoregressive spatial modelling approaches shall allow a better understanding of the underlying patterns of the spatial transformation of the business landscape over time (in our case since 1850 for India) and the predictable consequences of future changes in spatiotemporal scenarios for business performance, taking into account commutes and Euclidean spatial proximity.
    C-Anchor for Strengthening the Connection between Adhesively Bonded Laminates and Concrete Substrates
    C-Anchor for Strengthening the Connection between Adhesively Bonded Laminates and Concrete Substrates
    A new carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) anchor is developed and tested to delay debonding in reinforced concrete (RC) beams externally strengthened with FRP laminate/sheet. The C-shape anchor is made from a commercially available CFRP grid. The anchors legs are 95 mm long while the spacing between the legs is adjustable, depending on FRP laminate and beam widths. Nine full scale RC beams, 3.0 m long, 250 mm wide and 400 mm deep, were strengthened with CFRP laminate/sheet, with and without the C-anchor. The main test parameters were the type and amount of FRP laminate and the presence/absence of the anchor. Test results showed that beams with the anchor had generally 5%–10% higher debonding and failure load, and they reached higher deflection at failure than the companion beams without anchors. Although complete separation of the FRP laminate from the concrete was not observed in any of the beams with anchors, there was noticeable slip at failure at one end of the laminate. A significant outcome of the study is that anchors are effective in limiting the extent of debonding along the laminate, thus contributing to the flexural stiffness of the beam by reducing the extent of cracking and limiting the crack width along the beam. Finally, the anchor allowed the FRP to reach or exceed its theoretically allowable strain computed based on the American Concrete Institute (ACI) Committee 440 recommendation while in none of the beams without anchors, the FRP reached its theoretically allowable strain., Razaqpur, G., & Mostafa, A. (2015). C-anchor for strengthening the connection between adhesively bonded laminates and concrete substrates. Technologies, 3(4), 238-258., This article belongs to the Special Issue Bolted and Bonded Joints in Fibre Reinforced Polymer Structures.
    CWIRP Final Report: ICT Infrastructure as Public Infrastructure – Connecting Communities to the Knowledge-based Economy & Society
    CWIRP Final Report: ICT Infrastructure as Public Infrastructure – Connecting Communities to the Knowledge-based Economy & Society
    This report provides a summary of findings from the Community Wireless Infrastructure Research Project. This research investigated the development of public broadband infrastructure, and was conducted from April 2006 to March 2008 by a team of researchers from Ryerson University, York University and the University of Toronto.The specific questions that guided our research were as follows:• What is the rationale for publicly-owned and/or controlled ICT infrastructure?• What examples of public ICT infrastructure exist in Canada today?• What are the different models and best practices of public ICT infrastructure in terms of deployment, technology choice and innovation, investment, governance, adoption and use?• What are the public benefits of community-based/public ICT infrastructure provision?• What public policies and supports are necessary to promote and sustain public ICT infrastructure?We addressed these questions through case study work with our research partners (The City of Fredericton, Île Sans Fil in Montreal, K-Net and the Lac Seul Wireless Network in North Western Ontario, and Wireless Nomad in Toronto), as well as through extensive study of the broader context for public ICT infrastructure development.
    Calculation of arc-circuit asymmetry in electric-arc furnaces
    Calculation of arc-circuit asymmetry in electric-arc furnaces
    A method is described to determine the arc voltages on a per-phase basis of a 3-phase direct electricarc furnace. Having determined the arc voltages, other arc parameters, such as arc resistance, length and power, can then be obtained. By using the procedure outlined, in conjunction with experimental data on a 100 t, 5½m diameter shell furnace having a triangulated secondary electrical system, it will be shown that controlling arc powers by means of the impedance control method still results in asymmetric furnace operation. Sample calculations are included, illustrating actual conditions for this furnace., IEE Proceedings B: Electric Power Applications. Volume 130, Issue 3: 213 - 217. http://dx.doi.org/10.1049/ip-b:19830032
    Can Assembly Performance and Work Environment be Jointly Optimized? An Example Discreet Event Simulation Study
    Can Assembly Performance and Work Environment be Jointly Optimized? An Example Discreet Event Simulation Study
    We demonstrate here how discreet event simulation can be used to integrating ergonomics into design processes. In this case we test the effect of two different ways of organizing work within a conventional production line layout. We pay special attention to the sensitivity of the system to human factors such as work autonomy and reduced work pace. Results indicate the general superiority of a ‘dual-cell’ over a ‘chase-the-rabbit’ organization in accommodating human variability. The study shows how human considerations can be tested in the design process using flow simulation., For a more in-depth look on this subject, please see: Neumann, W.P. and Medbo, P., 2009. Integrating human factors into discrete event simulations of parallel and serial flow strategies. Production Planning & Control, 20(1): 3-16. DOI: 10.1080/09537280802601444
    Can Broadband Support Environmental Sustainability?: an Exploration of Claims at the Household Level
    Can Broadband Support Environmental Sustainability?: an Exploration of Claims at the Household Level
    This paper looks at the ways in which broadband networks can support sustainability, focusing on the actions of individual consumers in Australia. It centres on the arguments that broadband can be used to substitute physical products with digital ones, and to substitute physical activities (like travel) with digital ones (like videoconferencing and telework). Data on current broadband availability, uptake and usage in Australia are presented. The idea that broadband technologies are currently taken up in ways that encourage sustainable action is challenged, noting that average users are not yet sufficiently interested in, or comfortable with broadband technologies to act in ways that enable sustainability. Recognising that broadband networks do have the potential to encourage sustainability at the household level, the paper identifies current constraints and offers some suggestions on mitigating them., Middleton, C. (2009). Can broadband support environmental sustainability? An exploration of claims at the household level. Telecommunications Journal of Australia, 59(1), 10-1.
    Can God Choose a World At Random?
    Can God Choose a World At Random?
    Preprint of a book chapter later published in: Nagasawa, Y. and Wielenberg, E. [Eds.] New Waves in Philosophy of Religion, Palgrave MacMillan, 2008. Publisher URL: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?PID=326394
    Canada's Telecommunications Policy Environment
    Canada's Telecommunications Policy Environment
    This paper provides an overview of the telecommunications policy environment in Canada. Like Milner's (2009) article on New Zealand, this paper offers insights on international approaches to telecommunications policy. Canada's telecommunications history reveals a mix of private and public sector investment in regionally-based service providers. Canada did not have a single, publicly owned telecommunications carrier as was the case in Australia. Liberalisation of the telecommunications marketplace encouraged the development of competing infrastructures, with cable companies (traditionally focused on broadcasting distribution) and telephone companies now both providing wireline and wireless, voice, Internet and television services. Competition for wireline services remains regionally based, while wireless providers compete nationally. Although competition is intense, the broadband and wireless markets are highly concentrated. Competition in these markets has not resulted in extensive consumer choice, low prices or innovative services. Most Canadian consumers have access to broadband connectivity, but uptake rates now lag other OECD countries, for services that are slower and more expensive than those available in many other locations. Mobile phone penetration in Canada is on par with that of developing nations. The paper explores the characteristics of Canada's telecommunication markets, discusses the policy environment and notes that government has not offered a vision of a digital future for Canada., Middleton, C. (2011). Canada’s Telecommunications Policy Environment. Telecommunications Journal of Australia. (61:4). pp. 69.1-69.14.