Research

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  • Can God Choose a World At Random?
    Can God Choose a World At Random?
    Preprint of a book chapter later published in: Nagasawa, Y. and Wielenberg, E. [Eds.] New Waves in Philosophy of Religion, Palgrave MacMillan, 2008. Publisher URL: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?PID=326394
    Canada's Changing Immigration Policies: Report on Panel Discussion
    Canada's Changing Immigration Policies: Report on Panel Discussion
    On November 19, 2014, a panel of experts convened at Ryerson University to discuss the consequences of recent developments in Canada’s immigration and settlement policies. These developments have been summarized in the RCIS Working Paper A Critical Review and Assessment of Canada’s Fast Changing Immigration Policies by Lotf Ali Jan Ali. The panel consisted of Ratna Omidvar, Executive Director of the Global Diversity Exchange; Morton Beiser, Professor of Distinction in Psychology; Gil Lan, Assistant Professor, Ted Rogers School of Management; and Naomi Alboim, Adjunct Professor at Queen’s University School of Policy Studies. The panel was chaired by Academic Director of RCIS, Harald Bauder. In this Research Brief, we summarize the main points of the discussion.¹, Nyagano-Manungo, Barrass, Pekic. (2015). Canada's changing immigration policies: report on panel discussion. Toronto: Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement.
    Canada's Telecommunications Policy Environment
    Canada's Telecommunications Policy Environment
    This paper provides an overview of the telecommunications policy environment in Canada. Like Milner's (2009) article on New Zealand, this paper offers insights on international approaches to telecommunications policy. Canada's telecommunications history reveals a mix of private and public sector investment in regionally-based service providers. Canada did not have a single, publicly owned telecommunications carrier as was the case in Australia. Liberalisation of the telecommunications marketplace encouraged the development of competing infrastructures, with cable companies (traditionally focused on broadcasting distribution) and telephone companies now both providing wireline and wireless, voice, Internet and television services. Competition for wireline services remains regionally based, while wireless providers compete nationally. Although competition is intense, the broadband and wireless markets are highly concentrated. Competition in these markets has not resulted in extensive consumer choice, low prices or innovative services. Most Canadian consumers have access to broadband connectivity, but uptake rates now lag other OECD countries, for services that are slower and more expensive than those available in many other locations. Mobile phone penetration in Canada is on par with that of developing nations. The paper explores the characteristics of Canada's telecommunication markets, discusses the policy environment and notes that government has not offered a vision of a digital future for Canada., Middleton, C. (2011). Canada’s Telecommunications Policy Environment. Telecommunications Journal of Australia. (61:4). pp. 69.1-69.14.
    Canada's local news "poverty"
    Canada's local news "poverty"
    Newsrooms outside the big cities are closing, and with them goes the critical information citizens require for everyday life., Lindgren, A., Corbett, J. & Hodson, J. (2017, Jan 23). Canada’s local news “poverty”. Policy Options (Online), Retrieved from http://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/january-2017/canadas-local-news-poverty/
    Canada,	Libraries	and the Digital Economy
    Canada, Libraries and the Digital Economy
    What I will talk about • Digital economy strategies • Canada’s digital economy – wired broadband networks – mobile phones and broadband – extending network availability, increasing quality • Libraries as enablers of the digital economy, Canada, Libraries and the Digital Economy. Ontario Library Association Super Conference. Toronto. February 2014.
    Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders
    Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders
    Background Anxiety and related disorders are among the most common mental disorders, with lifetime prevalence reportedly as high as 31%. Unfortunately, anxiety disorders are under-diagnosed and under-treated. Methods These guidelines were developed by Canadian experts in anxiety and related disorders through a consensus process. Data on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment (psychological and pharmacological) were obtained through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and manual searches (1980–2012). Treatment strategies were rated on strength of evidence, and a clinical recommendation for each intervention was made, based on global impression of efficacy, effectiveness, and side effects, using a modified version of the periodic health examination guidelines. Results These guidelines are presented in 10 sections, including an introduction, principles of diagnosis and management, six sections (Sections 3 through 8) on the specific anxiety-related disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder), and two additional sections on special populations (children/adolescents, pregnant/lactating women, and the elderly) and clinical issues in patients with comorbid conditions. Conclusions Anxiety and related disorders are very common in clinical practice, and frequently comorbid with other psychiatric and medical conditions. Optimal management requires a good understanding of the efficacy and side effect profiles of pharmacological and psychological treatments., Katzman, M. A., Bleau, P., Blier, P., Chokka, P., Kjernisted, K., Van Ameringen, M.. . Canadian Anxiety Guidelines Initiative Group on behalf of the Anxiety Disorders Association of Canada/Association Canadienne des troubles anxieux and McGill University. (2014). Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders. BMC Psychiatry, 14 Suppl 1, S1-S1. doi:10.1186/1471-244X-14-S1-S1
    Canadian midwives of colour history project
    Canadian midwives of colour history project
    To document and understand the history of midwives of colour in Canada’s African diasporic communities during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Including: ● Enslaved peoples ● Fugitives/refugees of slavery ● Black pioneers/unsettlers ● Loyalists ● New immigrants, Wilson-Mitchell, K. , Lyaruu, T. Canadian midwives of colour history project. Presented at the Undergraduate Research Opportunities (URO) Program, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON
    Cancer risks in a population-based study of 70,570 agricultural workers: results from the Canadian census health and Environment cohort (CanCHEC)
    Cancer risks in a population-based study of 70,570 agricultural workers: results from the Canadian census health and Environment cohort (CanCHEC)
    Background Agricultural workers may be exposed to potential carcinogens including pesticides, sensitizing agents and solar radiation. Previous studies indicate increased risks of hematopoietic cancers and decreased risks at other sites, possibly due to differences in lifestyle or risk behaviours. We present findings from CanCHEC (Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort), the largest national population-based cohort of agricultural workers. Methods Statistics Canada created the cohort using deterministic and probabilistic linkage of the 1991 Canadian Long Form Census to National Cancer Registry records for 1992–2010. Self-reported occupations were coded using the Standard Occupational Classification (1991) system. Analyses were restricted to employed persons aged 25–74 years at baseline (N = 2,051,315), with follow-up until December 31, 2010. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were modeled using Cox proportional hazards for all workers in agricultural occupations (n = 70,570; 70.8% male), stratified by sex, and adjusted for age at cohort entry, province of residence, and highest level of education. Results A total of 9515 incident cancer cases (7295 in males) occurred in agricultural workers. Among men, increased risks were observed for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (HR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.00–1.21), prostate (HR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.06–1.16), melanoma (HR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.02–1.31), and lip cancer (HR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.70–2.70). Decreased risks in males were observed for lung, larynx, and liver cancers. Among female agricultural workers there was an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (HR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.07–1.72). Increased risks of melanoma (HR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.17–2.73), leukemia (HR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.24–3.25) and multiple myeloma (HR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.16–4.37) were observed in a subset of female crop farmers. Conclusions Exposure to pesticides may have contributed to increased risks of hematopoietic cancers, while increased risks of lip cancer and melanoma may be attributed to sun exposure. The array of decreased risks suggests reduced smoking and alcohol consumption in this occupational group compared to the general population., Kachuri, L., Harris, M. A., MacLeod, J. S., Tjepkema, M., Peters, P. A., & Demers, P. A. (2017). Cancer risks in a population-based study of 70,570 agricultural workers: Results from the canadian census health and environment cohort (CanCHEC). BMC Cancer, 17 doi:10.1186/s12885-017-3346-x
    Carbon Steel Versus Stainless Steel in the Design of Electrode Arms for UHP Electric Arc Furnaces
    Carbon Steel Versus Stainless Steel in the Design of Electrode Arms for UHP Electric Arc Furnaces
    Online version of an article originally published as: Carbon Steel Versus Stainless Steel in the Design of Electrode Arms for UHP Electric Arc Furnaces Ryff, Peter F.; Bulat, Vladimir; Industry Applications, IEEE Transactions on, IA-17, Issue 2, March 1981:222 - 230.
    Cardiovascular interventions for immigrant women :  a scoping review
    Cardiovascular interventions for immigrant women : a scoping review
    The purpose of this scoping review is to identify cardiovascular interventions that are designed to address the needs of immigrant women across North America and Europe. The articles retrieved were reviewed independently by both the first author and a trained research assistant. Although the search revealed many articles and resources related to supporting cardiovascular self-management behaviors among individuals, few focused on interventions designed for immigrant women who were diagnosed and living with cardiovascular disease. Also, it was difficult to determine the quality of the literature retrieved, as the main goal of this scoping review was to assess the body of literature and categorize materials by common themes and topics. A more in-depth structured systematic review is needed to determine the quality of evidence being presented and to serve as a rationale for the design and implementation of future culturally sensitive interventions delivered to immigrant women diagnosed with cardiovascular disease., Fredericks, S. & Guruge, S. (2016). Cardiovascular interventions for immigrant women: A scoping review. Clinical Nursing Research.1 (21), 1-22. DOI: 10.1177/1054773816643935.
    Care and the self: biotechnology, reproduction, and the good life
    Care and the self: biotechnology, reproduction, and the good life
    This paper explores a novel philosophy of ethical care in the face of burgeoning biomedical technologies. I respond to a serious challenge facing traditional bioethics with its roots in analytic philosophy. The hallmarks of these traditional approaches are reason and autonomy, founded on a belief in the liberal humanist subject. In recent years, however, there have been mounting challenges to this view of human subjectivity, emerging from poststructuralist critiques, such as Michel Foucault's, but increasingly also as a result of advances in biotechnology itself. In the face of these developments, I argue that the theoretical relevance and practical application of mainstream bioethics is increasingly under strain. Traditionalists will undoubtedly resist. Together, professional philosopher-bioethicists, public health policymakers, and the global commercial healthcare industry tend to respond conservatively by shoring up the liberal humanist subject as the foundation for medical ethics and consumer decision-making, appealing to the familiar tropes of reason, autonomy, and freedom. I argue for a different approach to bioethics, and work towards a new way to conceive of ethical relations in healthcare – one that does not presume a sovereign subject as the basis of dignity, personhood or democracy. Instead, I am critical of the narrow instantiations of reason, autonomy, and freedom, which, more recently, have been co-opted by a troubling neo-liberal politics of the self. Thus, I am critical of current trends in medical ethics, often running in tandem with corporate-governmental models of efficiency, accountability, and so-called evidence-based best practices. As an example of such market-driven conceptions of subjectivity, I discuss the paradigm of "self-care." Self-care shores up the traditional view of the self as a free agent. In this sense, self-care is looked upon favourably by mainstream bioethics in its focus on autonomy, while healthcare policy endorses this model for ideological and economic reasons. To contrast this, I propose a different model of care together with a different model of selfhood. Here I develop and apply Foucault's late work on the "care of the self." In this understanding of "care," I suggest that we might work towards an ethical self that is more commensurable both with recent theoretical views on subjectivity and – more pressingly – with the challenges of emergent biotechnologies. I end this paper with a discussion on ethical parenthood, which offers a practical reading of the "care of the self" in relation to new reproductive technologies (NRTs)., Murray, S. J. (2007). Care and the self: Biotechnology, reproduction, and the good life. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine : PEHM, 2(1), 6.