Research

  • 17764
  • 0
  • The Story of Vibe Magazine’s TLC Cover: How it Helps to Explain Race, Representation and Resistance from Journalism’s Hip-hop Generation
    The Story of Vibe Magazine’s TLC Cover: How it Helps to Explain Race, Representation and Resistance from Journalism’s Hip-hop Generation
    This paper is a case study of one Vibe magazine cover. The examination of this cover, which depicts multiplatinum girl band TLC, serves to provide an analytical framework that posits Vibe magazine as a vehicle for disrupting mainstream press visual narratives about African Americans in general and black youth in particular. However, this oppositional reading requires an analysis of not just the cultural artifact, but also a discussion of audience reception as well as the intentions of the media makers. While some have argued that one cannot battle stereotypes from within mainstream media these media makers were able to circulate new ideas and images. Vibe reproduced patriarchal imagery of African American women, yet conversations with media makers indicate a conscious desire to disrupt such images. For this discussion, I draw on my larger analysis of early Vibe magazine covers as well as interviews with Vibe’s founders and current media workers. Discussed here are motivations of the cover makers but also the cover image as a cultural artifact. One of the top fifty magazines in the U.S. in the 90’s, Vibe helped to catapult hip-hop culture into the mainstream. The paper contextualizes Vibe within journalistic and political history, and critical race communication theories.Keywords: Race and Representation, Hip-hop Journalism, Visual Communication, Vibe Magazine, The International Journal of the Image, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp.57-66. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 1.888MB). http://ijx.cgpublisher.com/product/pub.202/prod.91
    The Storytelling External Stakeholder: How Non-Profit Organizations in Supportive Housing Can Help Ensure That Externals Stakeholder Stories End in Connection
    The Storytelling External Stakeholder: How Non-Profit Organizations in Supportive Housing Can Help Ensure That Externals Stakeholder Stories End in Connection
    This paper examines the need for organizations to listen to and learn from the stories of their external stakeholders, especially in the context of supportive housing. To this end, this study builds on research conducted by the Dream Team in 2014, which was compiled to create a bill of rights for supportive housing tenants in the Greater Toronto Area. The literature describes many benefits of storytelling for organizations, but often overlooks the stories of external stakeholders in favour of leadership stories. And yet it is widely understood that it is impossible for one story or storyteller to completely capture the essence of any one organization. Ignoring the stories of external stakeholders creates an atmosphere of disconnection and is tantamount to turning a blind eye to unmet market needs. This paper proposes a framework in which a three-pronged linkage between “stakeholder engagement”, “intersectionality” (Crenshaw, 1991), and “organizational attention” (Gómez, 2015) informs an organization’s understanding of external stakeholders’ “exit” and “voice” behaviours (Hirschman, 1970)—and ultimately helps to ensure that the stories of external stakeholders end in connection. The findings of this study reveal that the subjunctive mood may typically be used to tell stories of disconnection, but more research is needed to determine this. Also, the data suggest that the biggest barrier to communication between tenants and supportive housing organizations may be the myth that people with mental illness and/or substance use issues are incompetent children who must be taken care of.
    The Survival Effect in Memory: Does It Hold into Old Age and Non-Ancestral Scenarios?
    The Survival Effect in Memory: Does It Hold into Old Age and Non-Ancestral Scenarios?
    The survival effect in memory refers to the memory enhancement for materials encoded in reference to a survival scenario compared to those encoded in reference to a control scenario or with other encoding strategies [1]. The current study examined whether this effect is well maintained in old age by testing young (ages 18–29) and older adults (ages 65–87) on the survival effect in memory for words encoded in ancestral and/or non-ancestral modern survival scenarios relative to a non-survival control scenario. A pilot study was conducted to select the best matched comparison scenarios based on potential confounding variables, such as valence and arousal. Experiment 1 assessed the survival effect with a well-matched negative control scenario in both young and older adults. The results showed an age-equivalent survival effect across an ancestral and a non-ancestral modern survival scenario. Experiment 2 replicated the survival effect in both age groups with a positive control scenario. Taken together, the data suggest a robust survival effect that is well preserved in old age across ancestral and non-ancestral survival scenarios., Yang L, Lau KPL, Truong L (2014) The Survival Effect in Memory: Does It Hold into Old Age and Non-Ancestral Scenarios? PLoS ONE 9(5): e95792.
    The Term Structure of Interest Rates in the European Union
    The Term Structure of Interest Rates in the European Union
    This paper uses cointegration and common trends techniques to investigate empirically the expectations hypothesis of the term structure of interest rates among the original 15 EU countries. By decomposing each term structure into its transitory and permanent components, we also examine whether the short or the long rate is weakly exogenous and thus determine the long run behavior of each term structure. The empirical results support the expectations theory of the term structure of interest rates for all the EU-15 countries. They also indicate that the long term interest rates are weakly exogenous for almost all the countries in our sample. Further, we investigate if the expectation theory of the term structure of interest rates is affected by other exogenous variables such as nominal and real exchange rates, inflation rates, inflation variance, money growth and its variance. Our evidence suggests that the inclusion of the other exogenous variables does not affect the expectations hypothesis for most of the EU-15 countries., Also available for download here: http://ideas.repec.org/p/crt/wpaper/0611.html
    The Term Structures of Interest Rates in the New and Prospective EU Countries
    The Term Structures of Interest Rates in the New and Prospective EU Countries
    This paper uses cointegration and common trends techniques to investigate empirically the expectations hypothesis of the term structure of interest rates for the 10 new EU countries, along with Bulgaria and Romania. The empirical results support the expectations theory of the term structure for all countries except Malta. By decomposing each term structure into its transitory and permanent components, we also analyze short run and long run interdependence among the term structures of interest rates in these countries. Our results indicate weak linkages among the term structures of the 10 new EU countries, and strong linkages between Bulgaria and Romania that hope to join the EU in 2007., Also available for download here: http://ideas.repec.org/p/crt/wpaper/0505.html
    The Use of Virtual Human Factors Tools in Industry – A Workshop Investigation
    The Use of Virtual Human Factors Tools in Industry – A Workshop Investigation
    This report presents the views of participants in a series of workshops on Human Factors (HF) in virtual production planning. The participants, ergonomists and engineers from both public and private sectors, were presented with 6 different Virtual Human Factors (VHF) tools: Discrete Event Simulation, Predetermined Motion Time Systems, Complex and Simple Digital Human Models, Virtual Reality and SIMTER . Comments expressed by participants were recorded on digital audio tapes and by note takers and questionnaires were handed out. Eight main characteristics were identified as influencing factors for the use of VHF tools: cost, time, training, difficulty of use, reliability, graphics, flexibility and usefulness. Other findings included a need to modify report layouts and improvement recommendations particular to each tool. The findings in this report present the initial steps of an ongoing research program with the aim of developing improved approaches to using simulation to integrate human factors proactively into the early stages of a work system design.
    The Use of Web 2.0 Concepts to Support Deliberation in Spatial Decision-Making
    The Use of Web 2.0 Concepts to Support Deliberation in Spatial Decision-Making
    Technologies associated with the second-generation of the World-Wide Web enable virtually anyone to share their data, documents, observations, and opinions on the Internet. In less than three years, mapping platforms such as Google Maps have sparked an exponential growth in user-generated geographically referenced content. However, the “serious” applications of Web 2.0 are sparse and this paper assesses its use in the context of collaborative spatial decision-making. We present an online map-based discussion forum that enables Internet users to submit place-based comments and respond to contributions from other participants. We further use the geographic references in a thread-based master plan debate for a university campus to simulate this debate in the map-based forum. This allows us to demonstrate how the online map provides an overview of the status and spatial foci of the debate, and how it can help us understand the spatial thought processes of the participants.
    The Visual Semiotics of Fragrance Branding: Exploring Jean Paul Gaultier's "Le Male"
    The Visual Semiotics of Fragrance Branding: Exploring Jean Paul Gaultier's "Le Male"
    This major research paper (MRP) examines the visual semiotics of Jean Paul Gaultier’s “Le Male” fragrance for men and how this brand appeals to gay male audiences. It seeks to address the following questions: How do product packaging, print advertising, and video advertising use visual semiotics to appeal to gay male audiences? What image of masculinity is being communicated? And how is gay male desire being commoditized? To answer these questions the study examined three artefacts through a compositional interpretation and a visual semiotic analysis: the fragrance bottle, a print advertisement, and a video commercial. The research demonstrates that “Le Male” appeals to gay male audiences through three strategies: (1) sexual objectification of the male body; (2) use of gay iconography, especially depictions of homoeroticism among sailors and homage to the illustrated erotica of Tom of Finland; and (3) gay-coded visual polysemy. Furthermore, it depicts attractive men with ambiguous sexual orientation as objects of worship. Jean Paul Gaultier’s “Le Male” integrates the idealized male form into its cologne bottle design, print and video advertisements. Its carefully crafted homoerotic fantasies resonate with a queer aesthetic, but do so within a minimal set of superficial values reflected in the fleetingly beautiful body. This study is relevant to how professional communicators can weave a coherent, visual story through a deeper understanding of rhetorical signs and symbols that resonate with specific subcultures. Findings from this MRP will be discussed along with suggestions for the brand to retain its success among gay consumers. The study also initiates further research in the areas of empirical confirmation, feminist gaze theory, intercultural theory, and multi-sensory branding.
    The attribution of meaning and emotion to song lyrics
    The attribution of meaning and emotion to song lyrics
    We examined the effect of music on the interpretation of song lyrics. Listeners were presented with sung lyrics, spoken lyrics, or written poetry, and judged the text for emotional valence and meaningfulness. Experiment 1 revealed that, for some songs, music influenced whether lyrics were interpreted as conveying a positive or negative message. Experiment 2 showed that for familiar music, sung lyrics were judged as more meaningful than the same lyrics presented as spoken text, suggesting that personal associations or other significance implied by familiar music are attributed to the accompanying lyrics. In Experiment 3, repeated exposure to unfamiliar songs led to an increase in the perceived meaningfulness of the lyrics. We raise the possibility that music and lyrics become represented in an increasingly integrated manner with increased exposure and familiarity, allowing greater cross-talk between the two media.
    The barriers to millennials visiting Rouge Urban National Park
    The barriers to millennials visiting Rouge Urban National Park
    Intensified urbanization has led to more populated cities and less green spaces which are vital to community health, wellbeing and conservation. Rouge Urban National Park in Toronto has recently become Canada’s first urban national park. This park is ideally suited to the millennial population, offering outdoor recreation and green space that this growing market generally desires. There is, however, a lack of research into visitor motivations to urban parks and more specifically millennial motivations. Findings from 280 quantitative surveys found three main barriers to visiting the Urban National Park: distance, transportation, and awareness. The lack of public transport combined with road congestion and fewer millennials owning cars creates issues with accessibility. Poor branding and knowledge through electronic media creates low awareness within a demographic market so tied to technology. Keywords: urban national parks; millennials; distance decay theory; visitor motivations; Canada, Ramsay, G., Dodds, R., Furtado, D., Mykhayletska, Y., Kirichenko, A., & Majedian, M. (2017). The barriers to millennials visiting Rouge Urban National Park. Sustainability, 9(6), 904., (This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Urban and Rural Development)
    The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty
    The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty
    Background A variety of techniques are available for fixation of femoral shaft fractures following total hip arthroplasty. The optimal surgical repair method still remains a point of controversy in the literature. However, few studies have quantified the performance of such repair constructs. This study biomechanically examined 3 different screw-plate and cable-plate systems for fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty. Methods Twelve pairs of human cadaveric femurs were utilized. Each left femur was prepared for the cemented insertion of the femoral component of a total hip implant. Femoral fractures were created in the femurs and subsequently repaired with Construct A (Zimmer Cable Ready System), Construct B (AO Cable-Plate System), or Construct C (Dall-Miles Cable Grip System). Right femora served as matched intact controls. Axial, torsional, and four-point bending tests were performed to obtain stiffness values. Results All repair systems showed 3.08 to 5.33 times greater axial stiffness over intact control specimens. Four-point normalized bending (0.69 to 0.85) and normalized torsional (0.55 to 0.69) stiffnesses were lower than intact controls for most comparisons. Screw-plates provided either greater or equal stiffness compared to cable-plates in almost all cases. There were no statistical differences between plating systems A, B, or C when compared to each other (p > 0.05). Conclusions Screw-plate systems provide more optimal mechanical stability than cable-plate systems for periprosthetic femur fractures near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty., Lever, J. P., Zdero, R., Nousiainen, M. T., Waddell, J. P., & Schemitsch, E. H. (2010). The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, 5(1), 45-45. doi:10.1186/1749-799X-5-45
    The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty
    The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty
    Background A variety of techniques are available for fixation of femoral shaft fractures following total hip arthroplasty. The optimal surgical repair method still remains a point of controversy in the literature. However, few studies have quantified the performance of such repair constructs. This study biomechanically examined 3 different screw-plate and cable-plate systems for fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty. Methods Twelve pairs of human cadaveric femurs were utilized. Each left femur was prepared for the cemented insertion of the femoral component of a total hip implant. Femoral fractures were created in the femurs and subsequently repaired with Construct A (Zimmer Cable Ready System), Construct B (AO Cable-Plate System), or Construct C (Dall-Miles Cable Grip System). Right femora served as matched intact controls. Axial, torsional, and four-point bending tests were performed to obtain stiffness values. Results All repair systems showed 3.08 to 5.33 times greater axial stiffness over intact control specimens. Four-point normalized bending (0.69 to 0.85) and normalized torsional (0.55 to 0.69) stiffnesses were lower than intact controls for most comparisons. Screw-plates provided either greater or equal stiffness compared to cable-plates in almost all cases. There were no statistical differences between plating systems A, B, or C when compared to each other (p > 0.05). Conclusions Screw-plate systems provide more optimal mechanical stability than cable-plate systems for periprosthetic femur fractures near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty., Lever, J. P., Zdero, R., Nousiainen, M. T., Waddell, J. P., & Schemitsch, E. H. (2010). The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, 5(1), 45-45. doi:10.1186/1749-799X-5-45