Research

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  • The Use of Web 2.0 Concepts to Support Deliberation in Spatial Decision-Making
    The Use of Web 2.0 Concepts to Support Deliberation in Spatial Decision-Making
    Technologies associated with the second-generation of the World-Wide Web enable virtually anyone to share their data, documents, observations, and opinions on the Internet. In less than three years, mapping platforms such as Google Maps have sparked an exponential growth in user-generated geographically referenced content. However, the “serious” applications of Web 2.0 are sparse and this paper assesses its use in the context of collaborative spatial decision-making. We present an online map-based discussion forum that enables Internet users to submit place-based comments and respond to contributions from other participants. We further use the geographic references in a thread-based master plan debate for a university campus to simulate this debate in the map-based forum. This allows us to demonstrate how the online map provides an overview of the status and spatial foci of the debate, and how it can help us understand the spatial thought processes of the participants.
    The Visual Semiotics of Fragrance Branding: Exploring Jean Paul Gaultier's "Le Male"
    The Visual Semiotics of Fragrance Branding: Exploring Jean Paul Gaultier's "Le Male"
    This major research paper (MRP) examines the visual semiotics of Jean Paul Gaultier’s “Le Male” fragrance for men and how this brand appeals to gay male audiences. It seeks to address the following questions: How do product packaging, print advertising, and video advertising use visual semiotics to appeal to gay male audiences? What image of masculinity is being communicated? And how is gay male desire being commoditized? To answer these questions the study examined three artefacts through a compositional interpretation and a visual semiotic analysis: the fragrance bottle, a print advertisement, and a video commercial. The research demonstrates that “Le Male” appeals to gay male audiences through three strategies: (1) sexual objectification of the male body; (2) use of gay iconography, especially depictions of homoeroticism among sailors and homage to the illustrated erotica of Tom of Finland; and (3) gay-coded visual polysemy. Furthermore, it depicts attractive men with ambiguous sexual orientation as objects of worship. Jean Paul Gaultier’s “Le Male” integrates the idealized male form into its cologne bottle design, print and video advertisements. Its carefully crafted homoerotic fantasies resonate with a queer aesthetic, but do so within a minimal set of superficial values reflected in the fleetingly beautiful body. This study is relevant to how professional communicators can weave a coherent, visual story through a deeper understanding of rhetorical signs and symbols that resonate with specific subcultures. Findings from this MRP will be discussed along with suggestions for the brand to retain its success among gay consumers. The study also initiates further research in the areas of empirical confirmation, feminist gaze theory, intercultural theory, and multi-sensory branding.
    The barriers to millennials visiting Rouge Urban National Park
    The barriers to millennials visiting Rouge Urban National Park
    Intensified urbanization has led to more populated cities and less green spaces which are vital to community health, wellbeing and conservation. Rouge Urban National Park in Toronto has recently become Canada’s first urban national park. This park is ideally suited to the millennial population, offering outdoor recreation and green space that this growing market generally desires. There is, however, a lack of research into visitor motivations to urban parks and more specifically millennial motivations. Findings from 280 quantitative surveys found three main barriers to visiting the Urban National Park: distance, transportation, and awareness. The lack of public transport combined with road congestion and fewer millennials owning cars creates issues with accessibility. Poor branding and knowledge through electronic media creates low awareness within a demographic market so tied to technology. Keywords: urban national parks; millennials; distance decay theory; visitor motivations; Canada, Ramsay, G., Dodds, R., Furtado, D., Mykhayletska, Y., Kirichenko, A., & Majedian, M. (2017). The barriers to millennials visiting Rouge Urban National Park. Sustainability, 9(6), 904., (This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Urban and Rural Development)
    The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty
    The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty
    Background A variety of techniques are available for fixation of femoral shaft fractures following total hip arthroplasty. The optimal surgical repair method still remains a point of controversy in the literature. However, few studies have quantified the performance of such repair constructs. This study biomechanically examined 3 different screw-plate and cable-plate systems for fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty. Methods Twelve pairs of human cadaveric femurs were utilized. Each left femur was prepared for the cemented insertion of the femoral component of a total hip implant. Femoral fractures were created in the femurs and subsequently repaired with Construct A (Zimmer Cable Ready System), Construct B (AO Cable-Plate System), or Construct C (Dall-Miles Cable Grip System). Right femora served as matched intact controls. Axial, torsional, and four-point bending tests were performed to obtain stiffness values. Results All repair systems showed 3.08 to 5.33 times greater axial stiffness over intact control specimens. Four-point normalized bending (0.69 to 0.85) and normalized torsional (0.55 to 0.69) stiffnesses were lower than intact controls for most comparisons. Screw-plates provided either greater or equal stiffness compared to cable-plates in almost all cases. There were no statistical differences between plating systems A, B, or C when compared to each other (p > 0.05). Conclusions Screw-plate systems provide more optimal mechanical stability than cable-plate systems for periprosthetic femur fractures near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty., Lever, J. P., Zdero, R., Nousiainen, M. T., Waddell, J. P., & Schemitsch, E. H. (2010). The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, 5(1), 45-45. doi:10.1186/1749-799X-5-45
    The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty
    The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty
    Background A variety of techniques are available for fixation of femoral shaft fractures following total hip arthroplasty. The optimal surgical repair method still remains a point of controversy in the literature. However, few studies have quantified the performance of such repair constructs. This study biomechanically examined 3 different screw-plate and cable-plate systems for fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty. Methods Twelve pairs of human cadaveric femurs were utilized. Each left femur was prepared for the cemented insertion of the femoral component of a total hip implant. Femoral fractures were created in the femurs and subsequently repaired with Construct A (Zimmer Cable Ready System), Construct B (AO Cable-Plate System), or Construct C (Dall-Miles Cable Grip System). Right femora served as matched intact controls. Axial, torsional, and four-point bending tests were performed to obtain stiffness values. Results All repair systems showed 3.08 to 5.33 times greater axial stiffness over intact control specimens. Four-point normalized bending (0.69 to 0.85) and normalized torsional (0.55 to 0.69) stiffnesses were lower than intact controls for most comparisons. Screw-plates provided either greater or equal stiffness compared to cable-plates in almost all cases. There were no statistical differences between plating systems A, B, or C when compared to each other (p > 0.05). Conclusions Screw-plate systems provide more optimal mechanical stability than cable-plate systems for periprosthetic femur fractures near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty., Lever, J. P., Zdero, R., Nousiainen, M. T., Waddell, J. P., & Schemitsch, E. H. (2010). The biomechanical analysis of three plating fixation systems for periprosthetic femoral fracture near the tip of a total hip arthroplasty. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, 5(1), 45-45. doi:10.1186/1749-799X-5-45
    The buffer effect of therapy dog exposure on stress reactivity in undergraduate students
    The buffer effect of therapy dog exposure on stress reactivity in undergraduate students
    Stress is an insidious health risk that is commonly reported among university students. While research suggests that dog exposure may facilitate recovery from a stress response, little is known about the buffer effect of dog exposure on the stress response to a future stressor. This study examined whether interaction with a therapy dog could reduce the strength of the physiological stress response when exposed to a subsequent stressor. Sixty-one university students were randomly assigned to either a therapy dog (TD, n = 31) or a no-dog control (C, n = 30) group. The stress response was measured by electrodermal activity (EDA) in response to the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT). Participants also completed questionnaires that assessed pet attitude, general stress levels, and affect. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) showed that increase in EDA was significantly more pronounced in the C group than in the TD group (p < 0.01). Pet attitudes did not modulate the buffer effect of therapy dog exposure. Results suggest that therapy dog exposure may buffer the stress response in university students, which has implications for the promotion of a viable stress management program on university campuses. Keywords: stress; therapy dog; intervention; human-animal interaction, Fiocco, A. J., & Hunse, A. M. (2017). The buffer effect of therapy dog exposure on stress reactivity in undergraduate students. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14(7), 707., (This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress and Health)
    The case for safe injection sites:  examining `harm reduction`in insite`s communication strategies
    The case for safe injection sites: examining `harm reduction`in insite`s communication strategies
    The term “harm reduction” has been used as a label for certain policies and programs in the field of illicit drugs for many years, but there has never been a universal definition for the term or unanimous consensus on how the term should be used. Some proponents argue that harm reduction must be a movement that challenges traditional drug laws, while others believe that harm reduction should chiefly be a public health approach that aims to improve the overall health of drug users. Some scholars hail harm reduction for taking an amoral and value-neutral position towards drug use, while others criticize it for devaluing human rights and perpetuating the marginalization of drug users. Drawing on Foucault’s framework of governmentality, Petersen and Lupton’s (1996) concept of the “new public health,” and Goffman’s (1963) theories on stigma, this research investigates the types of claims and arguments that InSite—Canada’s only supervised injection site and perhaps its most recognized harm reduction program—uses in its website and press releases to characterize and justify its services. Three news articles from The Vancouver Sun are also examined for a comparison of the complexities and diverse viewpoints that often arise in descriptions and defenses of harm reduction, supervised injection service, and illicit drug use.
    The critical incident inventory: characteristics of incidents which affect emergency medical technicians and paramedics
    The critical incident inventory: characteristics of incidents which affect emergency medical technicians and paramedics
    Background Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics experience critical incidents which evoke distress and impaired functioning but it is unknown which aspects of incidents contribute to their impact. We sought to determine these specific characteristics by developing an inventory of critical incident characteristics and testing their relationship to protracted recovery from acute stress, and subsequent emotional symptoms. Methods EMT/paramedics (n = 223) completed a retrospective survey of reactions to an index critical incident, and current depressive, posttraumatic and burnout symptoms. Thirty-six potential event characteristics were evaluated; 22 were associated with peritraumatic distress and were retained. We assigned inventory items to one of three domains: situational, systemic or personal characteristics. We tested the relationships between (a) endorsing any domain item and (b) outcomes of the critical incident (peritraumatic dissociation, recovery from components of the Acute Stress Reaction and depressive, posttraumatic, and burnout symptoms). Analyses were repeated for the number of items endorsed. Results Personal and situational characteristics were most frequently endorsed. The personal domain had the strongest associations, particularly with peritraumatic dissociation, prolonged distressing feelings, and current posttraumatic symptoms. The situational domain was associated with peritraumatic dissociation, prolonged social withdrawal, and current posttraumatic symptoms. The systemic domain was associated with peritraumatic dissociation and prolonged irritability. Endorsing multiple characteristics was related to peritraumatic, acute stress, and current posttraumatic symptoms. Relationships with outcome variables were as strong for a 14-item inventory (situational and personal characteristics only) as the 22-item inventory. Conclusions Emotional sequelae are associated most strongly with EMT/paramedics’ personal experience, and least with systemic characteristics. A14-item inventory identifies critical incident characteristics associated with emotional sequelae. This may be helpful in tailoring recovery support to individual provider needs., Halpern, J., Maunder, R. G., Schwartz, B., & Gurevich, M. (2012). The critical incident inventory: Characteristics of incidents which affect emergency medical technicians and paramedics. BMC Emergency Medicine, 12(1), 10-10. doi:10.1186/1471-227X-12-10
    The development of an online instrument for prior learning assessment and recognition of internationally educated nurses: A pilot study
    The development of an online instrument for prior learning assessment and recognition of internationally educated nurses: A pilot study
    The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, Vol 12, No 1 (2011), ISSN: 1492-3831. Also available online: http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/896