Research

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  • The Decision of Work and Study and Employment Outcomes
    The Decision of Work and Study and Employment Outcomes
    The paper studies factors that contribute to student's work study decision while attending postsecondary institutions using SLID and YITS data. It further tests that how the work decision can affect their future employment outcomes., Also available for download here: http://ideas.repec.org/p/rye/wpaper/wp014.html
    The Dependence Structure of Macroeconomic Variables in the US
    The Dependence Structure of Macroeconomic Variables in the US
    Also available for download via: http://ideas.repec.org/p/rye/wpaper/wp005.html
    The Deployment of Broadband Internet in Australia: Areas for Attention and Implications from Canada and Korea
    The Deployment of Broadband Internet in Australia: Areas for Attention and Implications from Canada and Korea
    Broadband Internet connectivity is currently seen as a means to increase the efficiency and competitiveness of an economy. The deployment and use of broadband capabilities is high on the current political agenda in many developed and developing countries, including Australia. But despite ongoing efforts to promote broadband in Australia, deployment has been much slower than expected. This paper aims to identify areas that have been holding up the broadband development in Australia. In examining four areas for attention (demand, competition, price and the role of government), we refer to experiences in Canada and Korea, both leaders in broadband deployment, to show the differences in each area. Although each country discussed here has its own policy agenda and some unique circumstances related to broadband deployment, implications from this paper will provide valuable input for policy makers and industry leaders in Australia (and elsewhere) as they develop strategies to encourage more widespread broadband deployment., Paper presented at the International Telecommunications Society Asia-Australasian Regional Conference, Perth, Australia.
    The Diverse City: Can you read all about it in ethnic newspapers?
    The Diverse City: Can you read all about it in ethnic newspapers?
    Lindgren, April. CERIS Working Paper #95: 2013. “The diverse city: Can you read all about it in ethnic newspapers?” Also available via: http://www.ceris.metropolis.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/CWP_95_-Lindgren.pdf Research summary available via: http://www.ceris.metropolis.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Lindgren_Research-Summary_2013.pdf
    The Effect of Building Aspect Ratio on Energy Efficiency: A Case Study for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings in Canada
    The Effect of Building Aspect Ratio on Energy Efficiency: A Case Study for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings in Canada
    This paper examines the energy consumption of varying aspect ratio in multi-unit residential buildings in Canadian cities. The aspect ratio of a building is one of the most important determinants of energy efficiency. It defines the building surface area by which heat is transferred between the interior and exterior environment. It also defines the amount of building area that is subject to solar gain. The extent to which this can be beneficial or detrimental depends on the aspect ratio and climate. This paper evaluates the relationship between the geometry of buildings and location to identify a design vernacular for energy-efficient designs across Canada., McKeen, P., & Fung, A. (2014). The effect of building aspect ratio on energy efficiency: A case study for multi-unit residential buildings in Canada. Buildings, 4(3), 336-354. doi:10.3390/buildings4030336, (This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)
    The Effect of Time Pressure on Risky Financial Decisions from Description and Decisions from Experience
    The Effect of Time Pressure on Risky Financial Decisions from Description and Decisions from Experience
    Time pressure has been found to impact decision making in various ways, but studies on the effects time pressure in risky financial gambles have been largely limited to description-based decision tasks and to the gain domain. We present two experiments that investigated the effect of time pressure on decisions from description and decisions from experience, across both gain and loss domains. In description-based choice, time pressure decreased risk seeking for losses, whereas for gains there was a trend in the opposite direction. In experience-based choice, no impact of time pressure was observed on risk-taking, suggesting that time constraints may not alter attitudes towards risk when outcomes are learned through experience., Wegier Pete, Spaniol Julia (2015) The Effect of Time Pressure on Risky Financial Decisions from Description and Decisions from Experience. PLoS ONE 10(4): e0123740.
    The Effect of Volume Fraction on the Backscatter from Nucleated Cells at High Frequencies
    The Effect of Volume Fraction on the Backscatter from Nucleated Cells at High Frequencies
    Online version of a conference paper originally published as: The Effect of Volume Fraction on the Backscatter from Nucleated Cells at High Frequencies, R.E. Baddour and M.C. Kolios In Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, Volume 2, pp.1672-74. Publisher URL: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=1603185
    The Effect of a Denser City over the Urban Microclimate: The Case of Toronto
    The Effect of a Denser City over the Urban Microclimate: The Case of Toronto
    In the last decades, several studies have revealed how critical the urban heat island (UHI) effect can be in cities located in cold climates, such as the Canadian one. Meanwhile, many researchers have looked at the impact of the city design over the urban microclimate, and have raised concerns about the development of too dense cities. Under the effect of the “Places to Growth” plan, the city of Toronto is experiencing one of the highest rates of building development in North America. Over 48,000 and 33,000 new home permits were issued in 2012 and 2013 respectively, and at the beginning of 2015, almost 500 high-rise proposals across the Greater Toronto Area were released. In this context, it is important to investigate how new constructions will affect the urban microclimate, and to propose strategies to mitigate possible UHI effects. Using the software ENVI-met, microclimate simulations for the Church-Yonge corridor both in the current situation and with the new constructions are reported in this paper. The outdoor air temperature and the wind speed are the parameters used to assess the outdoor microclimate changes. The results show that the new constructions could increase the wind speed around the buildings. However, high-rise buildings will somewhat reduce the air temperature during day-time, as they will create large shadow areas, with lower average mean radiant temperature., Berardi, U., & Wang, Y. (2016). The effect of a denser city over the urban microclimate: The case of toronto. Sustainability, 8(8), 822., (This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Heat Island)
    The Effects of Map Reading Expertise and Map Type on Eye Movements in Map Comparison Tasks
    The Effects of Map Reading Expertise and Map Type on Eye Movements in Map Comparison Tasks
    Comparing maps of different geographical phenomena, or maps of the same geographical phenomenon at different points in time, is a frequent task in many disciplines. The process of map comparison has been studied occasionally by cartographers since the 1970s, but recent improvements in neuropsychological testing equipment and in geographical information system (GIS) technology had us review this topic in a new light. We propose a cognitive approach using eye movement recording to understand the process of comparing two static maps displayed simultaneously on a screen.Two groups of subjects with different levels of expertise with map reading were shown pairs of maps and asked to judge their similarity or difference. We used three types of maps that differed in their spatial granularity: (A) randomly generated, 64-by-64 pixel, black-and-white images, (B) grayscale choropleth maps representing socio-economic variables for counties in lower Michigan, and (C) land-use maps of the surroundings of selected Canadian cities in different years resulting from classified satellite imagery. Subjects were asked whether two maps presented on the screen were similar (tests A and B) or different (test C).Response times, fixation durations and fixation counts differed significantly for the three map types. Land-use maps required the longest response times indicating that they were most difficult to compare. At the same time, land-use maps required more fixations than the other two types of maps, while the duration of these fixations was not different from the other map types. When comparing two maps of the same type, saccades between the two maps provide information on the subject’s decision-making process. We found that for the land-use maps, the number of these cross-saccades was significantly smaller than for the two other map types.Pairs of land-use maps were characterized by a fine raster grid and fewer pixel-by-pixel differences between the two maps, while both, random grids in test A and county maps in test B consist of clear-cut spatial units. We conclude that whenever spatial units can be distinguished on a map and corresponding units on a second map can be found easily, subjects will tend to compare the two maps in a unit-by-unit approach. In contrast, if maps consist of smoother spatial patterns, subjects will try to memorize patterns on one map (usually the one on the right-hand side), and make fewer saccades to compare these patterns with those on the other map. The results from this experiment could be used to provide context-adaptive tools for map comparison in GIS.The behavioral differences between groups (experts vs. novices) in this experiment were mostly not significant. This supports the notion of developing standard GIS tools that are offered to users with a wide range of expertise.
    The Evolution of the Conditional Joint Distribution of Life Expectancy and Per Capita Income Growth
    The Evolution of the Conditional Joint Distribution of Life Expectancy and Per Capita Income Growth
    Also available for download here: http://ideas.repec.org/p/gue/guelph/2009-1.html