Research

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  • Women in the Field: What Do You Know?
    Women in the Field: What Do You Know?
    Rauhala, Ann and April Lindgren. 2012. Women in the Field: What do youknow? Proceedings of the 2012 annual conference of the CanadianCommunication Association. Available via: <http://cca.kingsjournalism.com/?p=173>.
    Women's organizations are different:  their response to shifts in Canadian policy
    Women's organizations are different: their response to shifts in Canadian policy
    [Paragraph 1 of Introduction]: There are an estimated 200,000 nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations in Canada today offering a wide array of services to all segments of the population, ranging from food banks, women’s shelters, children’s aid societies, and immigrant service organizations to environmental protection agencies, opera companies and sporting societies (Browne, 1996). A significant, but unknown, percentage of voluntary organizations are led by women and governed by boards that are predominantly made up of women. Despite the 2 pervasiveness of these organizations, there has been little research focusing on them. We seek to redress this neglect by comparing 351 women’s voluntary organizations to 294 ‘other’ (gender neutral) voluntary organizations. Specifically, this paper investigates whether there are differences in attitudes, behaviours and perceptions between the leaders of women’s voluntary organizations and the leaders of ‘other’ voluntary organizations regarding: 1) perceptions of the environment; 2) outlook for the future; 3) perceptions of the impact of the external environment on the organization; 4) organizational changes made in response to environmental pressures; and 5) collaborative behaviour and attitudes. Keywords: CVSS, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Working Paper Series,TRSM, Ted Rogers School of Management Citation:, Meinhard, A.G. & Foster, M. K. (2002). Women’s Organizations Are Different: Their Response to Shifts in Canadian Policy. (Working Paper Series, Number 21, November 2002). Toronto : Ted Rogers School of Management, Centre for Volunteer Sector Studies, Ryerson University.
    Women's voluntary organizations are different:  their response to shifts in Canadian policy
    Women's voluntary organizations are different: their response to shifts in Canadian policy
    [Paragraph 1 of Introduction]: Although women make up more then half of Canada’s volunteers, and a large number of voluntary organizations are exclusively female, there has been little research focussing on women’s voluntary organizations. The purpose of this study is to correct this neglect by surveying 351 women’s voluntary organizations (as defined in the Methods section), and comparing them to 294 voluntary organizations that do not fall into the category of women’s organizations. Specifically, we investigate the responses of these voluntary organizations to the changes wrought by the neo-conservative political philosophy that has replaced the social democratic liberalism of the post-war era (see McBride and Shields, 1997). Keywords: CVSS, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Working Paper Series,TRSM, Ted Rogers School of Management Citation:, Meinhard, A.G. & Foster, M. K. (2002). Women’s Voluntary Organizations are Different: Their Response to Shifts in Canadian Policy. (Working Paper Series Volume 2002(2)). Toronto : Ted Rogers School of Management, Centre for Volunteer Sector Studies, Ryerson University.
    Women, smartphones and the workplace: pragmatic realities and performative identities
    Women, smartphones and the workplace: pragmatic realities and performative identities
    This paper explores the ways that a sample of professional women use smartphones to manage their personal activities and work responsibilities. It reveals a number of specific, mindful practices used to convey and enable accessibility, professionalism and responsiveness to colleagues and clients, showing how smartphones are used to shape and maintain professional identities. At the same time, women also choose to set boundaries to ensure that the immediacy enabled by their smartphones does not encroach upon their personal relationships in undesirable or unpredictable ways, and to allow them to choose when to engage with work while outside the office. The paper reveals the nuances of smartphone use in this group of women, demonstrating various approaches to managing a potentially disruptive communications device to professional and personal advantage, Crowe, R., & Middleton, C. (2012). WOMEN, SMARTPHONES AND THE WORKPLACE: Pragmatic realities and performative identities. Feminist Media Studies, 12(4), 560-569. doi:10.1080/14680777.2012.741872
    Women’s voluntary organizations and the restructuring of Canada’s voluntary sector: a theoretical perspective
    Women’s voluntary organizations and the restructuring of Canada’s voluntary sector: a theoretical perspective
    Creative and innovative strategies will be required as voluntary organizations find themselves under increased pressure in response to changes in their relationship with government funders. In the past, women’s voluntary organizations shaped the character of the voluntary sector; similarly today, they may be the harbingers of future trends. Keywords: CVSS, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Working Paper Series,TRSM, Ted Rogers School of Management Citation:, Meinhard, A. G. & Foster, M. K. (1996). Women’s Voluntary Organizations and the Restructuring of Canada’s Voluntary Sector: a Theoretical Perspective. (Working Paper Series Volume 1996(3)). Toronto : Ted Rogers School of Management, Centre for Volunteer Sector Studies, Ryerson University.
    Work Integration Social Enterprises (WISEs): Their Potential Contribution to Labour Market (Re-)Integration of At Risk Populations
    Work Integration Social Enterprises (WISEs): Their Potential Contribution to Labour Market (Re-)Integration of At Risk Populations
    Canada’s nonprofit sector contributes significantly to the (re-) integration of economically at risk individuals into the workforce by providing employment related and social services. Over the last decade, more non-profit organizations (and a few for-profit organizations) have turned to a creative new strategy to help (re-)integrate highly disadvantaged populations into the workforce— the creation of social enterprise businesses that provide jobs for disadvantaged workers as well as training, placement and other supports. These jobs can be transitional, stops on the way to integration into the mainstream labour market, or stable, long-term alternatives to existing mainstream jobs. Restaurants, retail stores, courier services, cottage industries, and construction companies are common social enterprise businesses employing vulnerable populations in Canada (e.g. Elson & Hall, 2010). Recent surveys suggest that these organizations, known in Europe as WISEs (Work Integration Social Enterprises), are among the most common social enterprises in Canada’s emergent social enterprise sector (e.g. Elson & Hall, 2010; O’Connor et al, 2012; Flatt et al 2013). Keywords: CVSS, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Working Paper Series,TRSM, Ted Rogers School of Management Citation:, O'Connor, P. & Meinhard, A. (2014). Work integration social enterprises (WISEs): their potential contribution to labour market (re-) integration of at risk populations. Toronto: Ted Rogers School of Management, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Ryerson University.
    Working with Ebook Metadata
    Working with Ebook Metadata
    Presented at British Columbia Library Association annual conference, April 23, 2010, Penticton, BC.
    You're hired:  examining acceptance of social media screening of job applicants
    You're hired: examining acceptance of social media screening of job applicants
    The paper examines attitudes towards employers using social media to screen job applicants. In an online survey of 454 participants, we compare the comfort level with this practice in relation to different types of information that can be gathered from publicly accessible social media. The results revealed a nuanced nature of people’s information privacy expectations in the context of hiring practices. People’s perceptions of employers using social media to screen job applicants depends on (1) whether or not they are currently seeking employment (or plan to), (2) the type of information that is being accessed by a prospective employer (if there are on the job market), and (3) their cultural background, but not gender. The findings emphasize the need for employers and recruiters who are relying on social media to screen job applicants to be aware of the types of information that may be perceived to be more sensitive by applicants, such as social network-related information. Keywords : social media, information privacy, job screening, hiring practices, Gruzd, A., Jacobson, J., Dubois, E. (2017). You're Hired: Examining Acceptance of Social Media Screening of Job Applicants. In Proceedings of the 23rd Americas Conference on Information Systems, August 10-12, 2017, Boston, MA, USA.
    ‘Identi-city’: Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto
    ‘Identi-city’: Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto
    Each year, at the start of the winter semester, undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and staff, and invited guests come together to take part in the annual Collaborative Exercise (CEx) held at the Department of Architectural Science at Ryerson University. The five-day event challenges students to address an important contemporary issue. The intention of the exercise is to engage students to collaborate, think and design, while investigating a topic related to architecture and the built environment. Through this experience, students have the opportunity to work with students from other years in the Department’s program, to achieve a common design goal. The Collaborative Exercise ends with an exhibition at the Paul H. Cocker Gallery in the Ryerson University’s Architecture Building. This book showcases the outcomes of the 2014 Collaborative Exercise, entitled ‘Identi-city’ – Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto., Kapelos, G. T. (Ed.). (2017). ‘Identi-city’: Creating Second Generation Museums for Toronto. Toronto, ON, Canada: Department of Architectural Science, Faculty of Engineering & Architectural Science, Ryerson University.
    ‘Reinventing’ the third sector: alternative service delivery, partnerships and the new public administration of the Canadian post-welfare state
    ‘Reinventing’ the third sector: alternative service delivery, partnerships and the new public administration of the Canadian post-welfare state
    [First paragraph of Introduction]: The neo-liberal assault on the Keynesian welfare state and the demand that government be 'reinvented' has come to focus increased attention upon the so-called `third sector'. This has occurred because of the moves by neo-liberal governments to downloading former public responsibilities onto the market, nonprofit organizations and individuals; their desire to forge new partnership relationships with non-state actors like voluntary bodies in order to develop alternative service delivery options; and the neo-liberal assertion that intrusive government has worked to undermine voluntary citizen participation, charitable giving, and self-help. Keywords: CVSS, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Working Paper Series,TRSM, Ted Rogers School of Management Citation:, Evans, B. M. & Shields, J. (1998). ‘Reinventing’ the Third Sector: Alternative Service Delivery, Partnerships and the New Public Administration of the Canadian Post-Welfare State. (Working paper Volume 1998 (1)). Toronto : Ted Rogers School of Management, Centre for Volunteer Sector Studies, Ryerson University.
    “Feels like you’ve hit the lottery”: Assessing the implementation of a discovery layer tool at Ryerson University
    “Feels like you’ve hit the lottery”: Assessing the implementation of a discovery layer tool at Ryerson University
    The research study was initiated to evaluate and assess the web-scale discovery (WSD) service Summon to coincide with its launch at Ryerson University Library in September 2011. The project utilized a mixed methods sequential explanatory strategy and applied an inductive analysis. Quantitative data was gathered with two online questionnaires, followed by a series of focus groups with students for the qualitative phase. The quantitative phase of the study collected over 6,200 survey responses (21% of the university population), with over 420 students indicating interest in participating in a qualitative follow-up (6.7% of the respondents). The survey data showed that most undergraduate students rated Summon highly in ease of use; however, there was a lower satisfaction with the large quantity of, and relevance of search results. Additionally, participants indicated that they used Summon in conjunction with other research tools, such as Google Scholar. In the qualitative phase, small focus groups, consisted of a total of 13 participants, allowed the students to express their experiences with Summon in depth. The study has given insight into the role of Summon in terms of undergraduate information-seeking behaviour. Participant feedback revealed potential improvements for Summon at Ryerson and will be useful to other institutions either using or considering the use of similar products. Overall, the results from the study will help to inform Ryerson Library practice surrounding future directions in reference, instruction, and service promotion.
    “No Apple iPhone? You must be Canadian”:  mobile technologies, participatory culture, and rhetorical transformation
    “No Apple iPhone? You must be Canadian”: mobile technologies, participatory culture, and rhetorical transformation
    Abstract: Participation with new mobile devices drives new social practices. This article engages in a close analysis of a so-called participatory culture surrounding iPods and iPhones. It offers close rhetorical readings of object phenomena including advertisements, Canadian news stories, and consumer reactions in electronic media. More specifically, this article reveals a rhetorical transformation between the iPod Silhouettes advertising campaign and the iPhone release campaign, causing a shift in subjectivity; iPod subjects are afforded a degree of freedom and play, while iPhone subjects are bound to regimes of work. It is also argued that news stories that emerged in the summer of 2007, when the iPhone was not released in Canada, structure a rhetoric of the “excluded Canadian.” Keywords: Mobile communication; Rhetoric; Visual communication, Pedersen, I. (2008). “No Apple iPhone? You Must Be Canadian”:. Canadian Journal of Communication, 33, 491-510.