Research

  • 20813
  • 0
  • Vertical phosphorus migration in a biosolids-amended sandy loam soil in laboratory settings: concentrations in soils and leachates
    Vertical phosphorus migration in a biosolids-amended sandy loam soil in laboratory settings: concentrations in soils and leachates
    The impacts of biosolids land application on soil phosphorus and subsequent vertical migration to tile drainage were assessed in a laboratory setup. Soil, representing typical “nonresponse” Ontario soil as specified by Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA), was amended with anaerobically digested biosolids at a rate of 8Mgha−1 (dry weight). Over five months, these amended soil samples from two different depths were sequentially fractionated to determine various inorganic and organic phosphorus pools in order to evaluate phosphorus vertical migration within a soil profile. Soil leachate was analyzed for soluble reactive phosphorus.The results indicated that biosolids application did not significantly affect phosphorus concentrations in soil and did not cause phosphorus vertical migration. The concentrations of soluble reactive phosphorus also were not significantly affected by biosolids., Markunas, Y., Bostan, V., Laursen, A., Payne, M., & McCarthy, L. (2016). Vertical phosphorus migration in a biosolids-amended sandy loam soil in laboratory settings: Concentrations in soils and leachates. Applied and Environmental Soil Science, 2016 doi:10.1155/2016/3460939
    Vibration-based, nondestructive methodology for detecting multiple cracks in bending-torsion coupled laminated
composite beams
    Vibration-based, nondestructive methodology for detecting multiple cracks in bending-torsion coupled laminated composite beams
    Damage to composite structures occurs from impact, fatigue, or over stress and can be critical in the safe operation of wings or any structural member. This paper presents a method for detection of multiple cracks present in laminated composite bending-torsion coupled cantilevered beams using natural frequency data, a type of Nondestructive testing (NDT). This methodology relies on both experimentally collected natural frequencies and frequencies calculated using a mathematical model. Precise natural frequencies are calculated using a new dynamic finite cracked element (DFCE) formulated within and based on dynamic trigonometric shape functions. An algorithm is devised based on the Adam–Cawley criterion and extended to laminated composites with multiple cracks. This method has shown exceptional convergence on the size and location of cracks using a number of modes of free vibration with and without error in measured frequencies., Stephen R. Borneman and Seyed M. Hashemi, “Vibration-Based, Nondestructive Methodology for Detecting Multiple Cracks in Bending-Torsion Coupled Laminated Composite Beams,” Shock and Vibration, vol. 2018, Article ID 9628141, 10 pages, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/9628141
    Virtual Tools for Assessing Human and Organisational Factors in Production System Design
    Virtual Tools for Assessing Human and Organisational Factors in Production System Design
    For a more in-depth look on this subject, please see: Kazmierczak, K., Neumann, W.P. and Winkel, J., 2007. A case study of serial-flow car disassembly: ergonomics, productivity, and potential system performance. Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing, 17(4): 331-351. DOI: 10.1002/hfm.20078 Neumann, W.P. and Medbo, P., 2009. Integrating human factors into discrete event simulations of parallel and serial flow strategies. Production Planning & Control, 20(1): 3-16. DOI: 10.1080/09537280802601444 Perez, J. and Neumann, W.P., 2010. The Use of Virtual Human Factors Tools in Industry – A Workshop Investigation, Ryerson University, Toronto.http://digitalcommons.ryerson.ca/ie/1/
    Virtual identity: applying narrative theory to online character development
    Virtual identity: applying narrative theory to online character development
    This paper will explore the realm of virtual identity within the context of the online virtual world, Second Life. The creation of virtual identities involves the complex process of constructing an online self-presentation. With the prevalence of online forums and virtual reality, ordinary people are crafting identities online and digressing from their actual identities in real life. In order to explain this phenomenon, I draw on narrative theory’s conceptualization of character in order to understand how people craft online identities., Yumansky, S. (2008, Spring). Virtual identity: applying narrative theory to online character development. Stream: Culture/Politics/Technology, 1(1). Retrieved from http://journals.sfu.ca/stream/index.php/stream/article/view/4/4
    Visible minority status and philanthropy
    Visible minority status and philanthropy
    Recognition of the multi-cultural nature of the Canadian population has led many companies across a wide array of business domains to consider ways of reaching beyond their traditional bases of support to target hitherto untapped ethnic communities. Market conditions within the voluntary sector are pushing nonprofits along this same path. Unfortunately, there is no systematic Canadian research on the attitudes, social norms, benefits sought, expectations, opportunities, experiences or behaviours of ethnic communities in the voluntary sector. This paper contributes to this gap by looking at philanthropic behaviour by visible minority status Keywords: CVSS, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Working Paper Series,TRSM, Ted Rogers School of Management Citation:, Berger, I., & Azaria, J. (2004). Visible minority status and philanthropy (Working Paper Series Volume 2004 (1)). Toronto: Ted Rogers School of Management, Centre for Voluntary Sector Studies, Ryerson University.
    Visualising early engineering design information with diagrams
    Visualising early engineering design information with diagrams
    Publisher URL: https://www.inderscience.com/info/inarticle.php?artid=15569
    Visualization of Apoptotic Cells using Scanning Acoustic Microscopy and High Frequency Ultrasound
    Visualization of Apoptotic Cells using Scanning Acoustic Microscopy and High Frequency Ultrasound
    Online version of a conference paper originally published as: Visualization of Apoptotic Cells using Scanning Acoustic Microscopy and high frequency ultrasound, S. Brand*, G. J. Czarnota, E. C. Weiss, R. Lemor and M.C.Kolios, In Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, Volume 2, Page(s):882 - 885 Publisher URL: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=1602991
    Visualization of Lake Mead Surface Area Changes from 1972 to 2009
    Visualization of Lake Mead Surface Area Changes from 1972 to 2009
    For most of the last decade, the south-western portion of the United States has experienced a severe and enduring drought. This has caused serious concerns about water supply and management in the region. In this research, 30 orthorectified Landsat satellite images from the United States Geological Service (USGS) Earth Explorer archive were analyzed for the 1972 to 2009 period. The images encompassed Lake Mead (a major reservoir in this region) and were examined for changes in water surface area. Decadal lake area minimums/maximums were achieved in 1972/1979, 1981/1988, 1991/1998, and 2009/2000. The minimum lake area extent occurred in 2009 (356.4 km2), while the maximum occurred in 1998 (590.6 km2). Variable trends in water level and lake area were observed throughout the analysis period, however progressively lower values were observed since 2000. The Landsat derived lake areas show a very strong relationship with actual measured water levels at the Hoover Dam. Yearly water level variations at the dam vary minimally from the satellite derived estimates. A complete (yearly) record of satellite images may have helped to reduce the slight deviations in the time series., Forsythe, K. W., Schatz, B., Swales, S. J., Ferrato, L., & Atkinson, D. M. (2012). Visualization of lake mead surface area changes from 1972 to 2009. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information, 1(3), 108-119. doi:10.3390/ijgi1020108
    Visualizing Information in the Early Stages of Engineering Design
    Visualizing Information in the Early Stages of Engineering Design
    The early stages of engineering design are the most crucial for successful product development, yet they are not well supported with computer tools compared to other, downstream stages. This paper will discuss recent efforts by the authors to create visual representations of, and tools for, the non geometric, qualitative information typical in the early stages of engineering design. It appears evident that there is tremendous opportunity to improve the capacity of designers to think both critically and creatively through diagramming in early design, but the field is still embryonic and much work remains to be done., Salustri, F. A., Eng, N. L., & Weerasinghe, J. S. (2008). Visualizing Information in the Early Stages of Engineering Design. Computer-Aided Design and Applications, 5((1-4)), 1-18. doi:10.3722/cadaps.2008.xxx-yyy
    Wait times for publicly funded addiction and problem gambling treatment agencies in Ontario, Canada
    Wait times for publicly funded addiction and problem gambling treatment agencies in Ontario, Canada
    Background This study describes the definitions of wait times and intake processes used by drug and problem gambling treatment agencies in Ontario, Canada, as well as the various strategies employed to ameliorate client backlog. Methods An online survey was developed and distributed to 203 publicly-funded, provincial substance use and problem gambling treatment agencies from June to August, 2011. All aspects of the intake process were covered in the survey. Results Based on 139 responses, six different wait time periods were identified. Additional analyses were completed by type of service offered. Suggestions for effective interventions to shorten wait times and recommendations for future research are provided. Conclusion The results of this study highlight a need for standardized definitions of wait times across substance use and problem gambling treatment services., Pascoe, R. V., Rush, B., & Rotondi, N. K. (2013). Wait times for publicly funded addiction and problem gambling treatment agencies in ontario, canada. BMC Health Services Research, 13, 483. doi:10.1186/1472-6963-13-483
    Wake-model effects on induced drag prediction of staggered boxwings
    Wake-model effects on induced drag prediction of staggered boxwings
    For staggered boxwings the predictions of induced drag that rely on common potential-flow methods can be of limited accuracy. For example, linear, freestream-fixed wake models cannot resolve effects related to wake deflection and roll-up, which can have significant affects on the induced drag projection of these systems. The present work investigates the principle impact of wake modelling on the accuracy of induced drag prediction of boxwings with stagger. The study compares induced drag predictions of a higher-order potential-flow method that uses fixed and relaxed-wake models, and of an Euler-flow method. Positive-staggered systems at positive angles of attack are found to be particularly prone to higher-order wake effects due to vertical contraction of wakes trajectories, which results in smaller effective height-to-span ratios than compared with negative stagger and thus closer interactions between trailing wakes and lifting surfaces. Therefore, when trying to predict induced drag of positive staggered boxwings, only a potential-flow method with a fully relaxed-wake model will provide the high-degree of accuracy that rivals that of an Euler method while being computationally significantly more efficient. Keywords: wake-model; boxwing; induced drag; potential-flow theory, Schirra, J., Bissonnette, W., & Bramesfeld, G. (2018). Wake-Model Effects on Induced Drag Prediction of Staggered Boxwings. Aerospace, 5(1), 14., (This article belongs to the Collection Feature Papers in Aerospace)
    Want to understand local news? Make a map
    Want to understand local news? Make a map
    Critics have suggested that scholars seeking to advance journalism studies must adopt a more multidisciplinary approach to research, one that looks beyond the strict confines of sociology, history, language studies, political science, or cultural analysis. This paper argues that the geography of news coverage is a valuable starting point for scholars who wish to understand what local news gets reported, why and how it gets reported, and the potential consequences of such news coverage. The work of the Local News Research Project at Ryerson University is introduced to illustrate how maps that reveal the geospatial aspects of local news can foster multidisciplinary investigations that push researchers beyond the traditional silos of journalism scholarship., Lindgren, April and Christina Wong. 2012. Want to understand local news?Make a map. Proceedings of the 2012 annual conference of the Canadian Communication Association. Available via: <http://cca.kingsjournalism.com/?p=169>.