Undergraduate

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  • Brothers in the kitchen:  the uprising, exodus and survival of a Tamily minority
    Brothers in the kitchen: the uprising, exodus and survival of a Tamily minority
    Brothers In the Kitchen (BiTk), is a site-specific live-documentary performed with an audience inside a fully operational restaurant. The triumvirate of story, performance, and audience is used to create an interactive and immersive documentary experience incorporating oral storytelling, poetry, dance, music, archival materials and television— all performed live. BiTk is the story of the uprising, exodus and survival of Tamil Sri Lankan citizens who fled a brutal civil war and sought refuge in Canada. The ethnic conflict, between the Buddhist Sinhala majority and the Hindu Tamil minority, sparked a mass exodus following the deadly riots of Black July in 1983. Subsequently, a staggering 300,000 Tamils found asylum in Canada. Soon an inordinate number of them began work as cooks and dishwashers in many Canadian restaurants. This live documentary is performed thirty years after the arrival of the first boatload of Tamil refugees, found adrift off the coast of Newfoundland, in 1986.
    Closing Canada's digital divide:  a review of policies in Canada and abroad
    Closing Canada's digital divide: a review of policies in Canada and abroad
    This paper explores Canada’s telecommunications policy landscape, with an aim of evaluating its effect on Canada’s digital divide. It looks into decisions made by the CRTC and ISED (and its predecessors), which have influenced the development of broadband infrastructure in Canada. This paper also evaluates the efficacy of digital literacy training programs, aimed at allowing Canadians to leverage connectivity. Finally, it concludes with a discussion about how the Innovation Agenda can be used as a mechanism to narrow Canada’s digital divide.
    Indigenous city field trip a resource guide to Ryerson University
    Indigenous city field trip a resource guide to Ryerson University
    This resource guide contributes to a knowledge base of events, facts, interpretations, and relationships relating to Indigenous peoples with a particular focus on the land that is currently occupied by Ryerson University. This knowledge base is available for free to anyone who wishes to learn about or educate others about this topic. We realize that nobody “owns” this knowledge but that knowledge is always embodied and situated in personal experiences. Please use and share this knowledge responsibly and with respect. The guide is intended to facilitate walking field trips involving particular sites (i.e. “stations”) located on or close to Ryerson campus. For each station, we identified several resources and included links to original sources. We structured this guide by listing the sources followed by a brief description of the information from the source in bullet form. This brief description does not replace reading the original source but is rather intended to help the reader navigate the guide. We envision several ways in which this guide can be used: it can be used as a self-guided tour; it can be used by the community organizations and Ryerson instructors to develop field trips to be delivered to their classes or other audiences; or it can be used by students and the wider community to learn about Indigenous peoples and their relationship to Ryerson University., Caribou, J., Reesor, R., & Ryerson University. School of Graduate Studies.Program in Immigration and Settlement Studies.Indigenous city field trip: A resource guide to Ryerson University
    Swipe-Technology’s Influence in Born Digital Culture: Redesigning Pedagogy in Early Childhood Education
    Swipe-Technology’s Influence in Born Digital Culture: Redesigning Pedagogy in Early Childhood Education
    This essay examines the ways in which technology defines and divides generations and considers how swipe-­technology (touch-­screen technologies) shape emerging learning styles. Specifically, it focuses on the research currently being investigated on how forms of digital literacy represent a radical shift, away from traditional forms of literacy (Prensky, 2001a, b; Frand, 2000; Prensky, 2001b; Tapscott, 1997; Franco, 2013; Plowman & McPake, 2013; Infante, 2014; Passey, 2014) and evaluates various claims made about the social consequences of such change. This paper emphasizes the impact that swipe-­technology has on young children during early stages of their development and seeks to answer the following question: what are the consequences of digital language becoming the Born Digital’s (Franco, 2013) primary form of expression? The paper draws on some traditional theories such as those of Mannheim (Kecskemeti, 1952) and Vygotsky (1929, 1962, 1978) to provide a broader contextualization. In so doing, it hopes to contribute to the dialogue about how educational institutions should be redesigned to accommodate new media technologies.