Undergraduate

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  • Setting priorities:  chemical hazard assessment and prioritization (CHAP):  an intuitive excel tool
    Setting priorities: chemical hazard assessment and prioritization (CHAP): an intuitive excel tool
    The purpose of CHAP is to assist small to medium workplaces and their Joint Health and Safety Committees to: 1. Better understand the hazards associated with the chemicals/products they are using; and 2. Prioritize the most ‘hazardous’ chemicals/products for additional assessment of the effectiveness of control measures which are currently in-place., Joo, J. (2019, October). Setting priorities: chemical hazard assessment and prioritization (CHAP): an intuitive excel tool. Poster session presented at The Undergraduate Research Opportunities (URO) Program, Toronto, ON.
    Soil and sediment analysis for agricultural and arctic landscapes
    Soil and sediment analysis for agricultural and arctic landscapes
    Soil plays in integral role in our terrestrial ecosystems. It is the membrane between the atmosphere and the biosphere. Soils provide a medium for vegetation, a filtration system for water, and contain the essential minerals and nutrients plants require (ref). Soil is composed of living (biotic) and non-living (abiotic) material. Soil development is a dynamic and ongoing process that depends on local climate, parent material, topography, vegetation, and time. The size of the inorganic mineral particles within a soil is referred to as grain size. Soil grain size is classified as Clay if the particle diameter is <0.002 mm, as silt if it is between 0.002 mm and 0.06 mm, or as sand if it is between 0.06 mm and 2 mm (Figure). The texture of a soil, or the distribution of particle grain size, can be a determining factor on how the soil drains or retains water, and its ability to retain nutrients, and its susceptibility to erosion, all of which can be direct factors in the development of natural vegetation or crop suitability. To classify a particular soils texture the proportions of particle size (% Sand, % Silt, % Clay) of a given sample is required. The use of a standard method is essential in order to compare data obtained at different locations (ref). A well-developed method for determining the quantitative proportions of particle size is the hydrometer method. Additionally, local soil conditions, or infrastructure (Roads) can have a direct impact on the water quality, specifically the turbidity of local water. The quantitative measure of sediment with water is known as Total Suspended Sediment, and can be related to other water quality measures such as conductivity. Total suspended solids is determined by filtering a known volume of water and measuring the mass of the suspended material that is captured on a fine filter., Lemke, E., Atkinson, D., Wellen, C. (2019, October). Soil and sediment analysis for agricultural and arctic landscapes. Presented at the Undergraduate Research Opportunities (URO) Program, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON.
    Swipe-Technology’s Influence in Born Digital Culture: Redesigning Pedagogy in Early Childhood Education
    Swipe-Technology’s Influence in Born Digital Culture: Redesigning Pedagogy in Early Childhood Education
    This essay examines the ways in which technology defines and divides generations and considers how swipe-­technology (touch-­screen technologies) shape emerging learning styles. Specifically, it focuses on the research currently being investigated on how forms of digital literacy represent a radical shift, away from traditional forms of literacy (Prensky, 2001a, b; Frand, 2000; Prensky, 2001b; Tapscott, 1997; Franco, 2013; Plowman & McPake, 2013; Infante, 2014; Passey, 2014) and evaluates various claims made about the social consequences of such change. This paper emphasizes the impact that swipe-­technology has on young children during early stages of their development and seeks to answer the following question: what are the consequences of digital language becoming the Born Digital’s (Franco, 2013) primary form of expression? The paper draws on some traditional theories such as those of Mannheim (Kecskemeti, 1952) and Vygotsky (1929, 1962, 1978) to provide a broader contextualization. In so doing, it hopes to contribute to the dialogue about how educational institutions should be redesigned to accommodate new media technologies.
    Testing ritual knot tracing for cognitive priming - effects rules out analytic analogy
    Testing ritual knot tracing for cognitive priming - effects rules out analytic analogy
    Vahedi, Z., Park, S., Pelkey, J., Matthews, S.W., (2019, October). Testing ritual knot tracing for cognitive priming-effects rules out analytic analogy. Poster session presented at The Undergraduate Research Opportunities (URO) Program, Toronto, ON.
    The University Medical Centre: A student’s perspective
    The University Medical Centre: A student’s perspective
    Over 515,000 students attended Ontario Universities in 2015/16, including 60,000 international students from abroad (https://ontario universityes.ca/resources/data/numbers). First-year students who are away from home find themselves needing a new primary care physician. While a few researchers have examined student health care within the university setting in regard to mental health (Evans, 1999), sexual health (Habel et al., 2018)., and health promotion (Griebler et al., 2017), there has been little research focused on the first-year student experience in finding primary care. Our study examined communication pathways, wayfinding and misconceptions students have related to the university medical centre. Patient centered care involves a partnership between a healthcare provider and their patient. In this partnership healthcare professionals must consider the patient experience and be more informative, mindful, empathic and collaborative to provide the best possible care (Epstein & Street, 2011)., Hubert, G., Pow, C., Tullio-Pow, S.(2019, October) The University Medical Centre: a student's perspective. Poster session presented at The Undergraduate Research Opportunities (URO) Program, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON.
    Violence against women in politics on Twitter a micro-analysis
    Violence against women in politics on Twitter a micro-analysis
    Gendered negativity attacks a person's gender identity to make the victim feel inferior. These attacks reenforcing gender norms and patriarchal ideologies. Women in politics, especially those who hold positions of high visibility, face a significant amount of gendered negativity compared to their male counterparts. Gendered negativity against women in politics can discourage women from pursue public office and other leadership positions., Gregory, M.(2019, October) Violence against women in politics on Twitter a micro-analysis. Poster session presented at The Undergraduate Research Opportunities (URO) Program, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON